10 found
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  1.  33
    `Babbling' and Social Context in Infant Monkeys: Parallels to Human Infants.A. Margaret Elowson, Charles T. Snowdon & Cristina Lazaro-Perea - 1998 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (1):31-37.
  2.  11
    The Rest of the Story: Grooming, Group Size and Vocal Exchanges in Neotropical Primates.Charles T. Snowdon - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):718-718.
  3.  19
    The Sounds of Silence.Charles T. Snowdon - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):167-168.
  4.  15
    Apples and Oranges: The Pitfalls of Comparative Intelligence.Anne Savage & Charles T. Snowdon - 1989 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (3):605-606.
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  5.  17
    Bottoms-Up! A Refreshing Change in Models.Charles T. Snowdon - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):266-267.
    Top-down models typically used to explain social behavior involve specific adaptations and higher level cognition. The Pavlovian conditioning model proposed can be extended to explain formation of dominance hierarchies and group structure, can replace a pheromonal model of reproductive suppression, and can be applied to language learning. This bottom-up approach based on general learning principles is a refreshing alternative to top-down models.
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  6.  16
    Dialects in Primates?Charles T. Snowdon - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):116-117.
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  7.  13
    Neither Homeostasis nor Simulation.Charles T. Snowdon - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):119-120.
  8.  11
    Ontogeny Does Not Always Recapitulate Phylogeny.Charles T. Snowdon & Jeffrey A. French - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (3):397-398.
  9.  42
    The Nurture of Nature: Social, Developmental, and Environmental Controls of Aggression.Charles T. Snowdon - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):384-385.
    Evidence from many species suggests that social, developmental, and cognitive variables are important influences on aggression. Few direct activational or organizational effects of hormones on aggression and dominance are found in nonhuman primates. Female aggression and dominance are relatively frequent and occur with low testosterone levels. Social, cultural, and developmental mechanisms have more important influences on dominance and aggression than hormones.
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  10.  7
    What's the Matter with Mind?Charles T. Snowdon & Alexandra Hodun - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (4):603-604.