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  1.  1
    Charles W. J. Withers (2009). Place and the" Spatial Turn" in Geography and in History. Journal of the History of Ideas 70 (4):637-658.
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  2.  28
    Charles W. J. Withers (2007). Placing the Enlightenment: Thinking Geographically About the Age of Reason. University of Chicago Press.
    The Enlightenment was the age in which the world became modern, challenging tradition in favor of reason, freedom, and critical inquiry. While many aspects of the Enlightenment have been rigorously scrutinized—its origins and motivations, its principal characters and defining features, its legacy and modern relevance—the geographical dimensions of the era have until now largely been ignored. Placing the Enlightenment contends that the Age of Reason was not only a period of pioneering geographical investigation but also an age with spatial dimensions (...)
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  3.  24
    David N. Livingstone & Charles W. J. Withers (eds.) (2005). Geography and Revolution. University of Chicago Press.
    A term with myriad associations, revolution is commonly understood in its intellectual, historical, and sociopolitical contexts. Until now, almost no attention has been paid to revolution and questions of geography. Geography and Revolution examines the ways that place and space matter in a variety of revolutionary situations. David N. Livingstone and Charles W. J. Withers assemble a set of essays that are themselves revolutionary in uncovering not only the geography of revolutions but the role of geography in revolutions. Here, scientific (...)
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  4.  1
    Charles W. J. Withers (2015). The Uses of Space in Early Modern History. Intellectual History Review 25 (4):455-457.
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    Charles W. J. Withers (2006). Geography, Science and National Identity in Early Modern Britain: The Case of Scotland and the Work of Sir Robert Sibbald (1641–1722). [REVIEW] Annals of Science 53 (1):29-73.
    (1996). Geography, science and national identity in early modern Britain: The case of Scotland and the work of Sir Robert Sibbald (1641–1722) Annals of Science: Vol. 53, No. 1, pp. 29-73.
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  6. Rebekah Higgitt & Charles W. J. Withers (2008). Science and Sociability: Women as Audience at the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1831–1901. Isis 99 (1):1-27.
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  7. Charles W. J. Withers (2004). David Buisseret.The Mapmakers’ Quest: Depicting New Worlds in Renaissance Europe. Xxi + 227 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003. $35. [REVIEW] Isis 95 (4):693-694.
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  8. Charles W. J. Withers (1995). Gunnar Eriksson. The Atlantic Vision: Olaus Rudbeck and Baroque Science. Uppsala Studies in History of Science, 19. Canton, MA: Science History Publications, 1994. Pp. Viii + 196. ISBN 0-88135-158-X. $27.95. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 28 (3):351.
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  9. Charles W. J. Withers (2005). Geography, Science, and the Scientific Revolution. In David N. Livingstone & Charles W. J. Withers (eds.), Geography and Revolution. University of Chicago Press
     
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