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Charmaine D. M. Royal [3]Charmaine D. Royal [2]
  1.  9
    Herstory as an Important Force in Bioethics.Stephen Sodeke, Faith E. Fletcher, Virginia A. Brown, John R. Stone, Cynthia B. Wilson, Tené Hamilton Franklin, Charmaine D. M. Royal & Vence L. Bonham - 2022 - Hastings Center Report 52 (S1):83-88.
    Hastings Center Report, Volume 52, Issue S1, Page S83-S88, March‐April 2022.
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  2.  25
    A content analysis of the views of genetics professionals on race, ancestry, and genetics.Sarah C. Nelson, Joon-Ho Yu, Jennifer K. Wagner, Tanya M. Harrell, Charmaine D. Royal & Michael J. Bamshad - forthcoming - AJOB Empirical Bioethics:1-13.
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  3.  25
    Grassroots Marketing in a Global Era: More Lessons from BiDil.Britt M. Rusert & Charmaine D. M. Royal - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (1):79-90.
    BiDil, a heart failure drug for African Americans, emerged five years ago as the first FDA approved drug targeted at a specific racial group. While critical scholarship and the popular media have meticulously detailed the history of BiDil from its inauspicious beginnings as a generic combination drug for the general population to its dramatic resuscitation as a racial medicine, the enthusiastic support shown by some African American interest groups has been too little understood, as has their argument that BiDil was (...)
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    Grassroots Marketing in a Global Era: More Lessons from BiDil.Britt M. Rusert & Charmaine D. M. Royal - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (1):79-90.
    Since the first phase of the formal effort to sequence the human genome, geneticists, social scientists and other scholars of race and ethnicity have warned that new genetic technologies and knowledge could have negative social effects, from biologizing racial and ethnic categories to the emergence of dangerous forms of genetic discrimination. Early on in the Human Genome Project, population geneticists like Luigi Luca Cavalli-Sforza enthusiastically advocated for the collection of DNA samples from global indigenous populations in order to track the (...)
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  5.  6
    Would you terminate a pregnancy affected by sickle cell disease? Analysis of views of patients in Cameroon.Ambroise Wonkam, Jantina de Vries, Charmaine D. Royal, Raj Ramesar & Fru F. Angwafo - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (9):615-620.
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