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  1.  6
    Victim and Culprit? The Effects of Entitlement and Felt Accountability on Perceptions of Abusive Supervision and Perpetration of Workplace Bullying.Jeremy D. Mackey, Jeremy R. Brees, Charn P. McAllister, Michelle L. Zorn, Mark J. Martinko & Paul Harvey - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (3):659-673.
    Although workplace bullying is common and has universally harmful effects on employees’ outcomes, little is known about workplace bullies. To address this gap in knowledge, we draw from the tenets of social exchange and displaced aggression theories in order to develop and test a model of workplace bullying that incorporates the effects of employees’ individual differences, perceptions of their work environments, and perceptions of supervisory treatment on their tendencies to bully coworkers. The results of mediated moderation analyses that examine responses (...)
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  2.  4
    About to Burst: How State Self-Regulation Affects the Enactment of Bullying Behaviors.Charn P. McAllister & Pamela L. Perrewé - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (3):877-888.
    Past research has demonstrated that employees’ perceptions of abusive supervision are positively associated with the enactment of bullying behaviors. However, an investigation of the factors influencing employees’ decision to bully others at work has yet to be completed. In this study, we propose that the relationship between perceptions of abusive supervision and the enactment of bullying behaviors is mediated by state self-regulation, and that active coping moderates the relationship between state self-regulation and bullying. Further, we analyze how the situational context (...)
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  3. Insubordination: Validation of a Measure and an Examination of Insubordinate Responses to Unethical Supervisory Treatment.Jeremy D. Mackey, Charn P. McAllister & Katherine C. Alexander - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
    Research that examines unethical interpersonal treatment has received a great deal of attention from scholars and practitioners in recent years due to the remarkable impact of mistreatment in the workplace. However, the literature is incomplete because we have an inadequate understanding of insubordination, which we define as “subordinates’ disobedient behaviors that intentionally exhibit a defiant refusal of their supervisors’ authority.” In our study, we integrate social exchange theory and the advantageous comparison component of moral disengagement within the integrative model of (...)
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