Results for 'Chemistry'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Reducing Chemistry to Physics: Limits, Models, Consequences.Hinne Hettema - 2012 - Createspace.
    Chemistry and physics are two sciences that are hard to connect. Yet there is significant overlap in their aims, methods, and theoretical approaches. In this book, the reduction of chemistry to physics is defended from the viewpoint of a naturalised Nagelian reduction, which is based on a close reading of Nagel's original text. This naturalised notion of reduction is capable of characterising the inter-theory relationships between theories of chemistry and theories of physics. The reconsideration of reduction also (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  2.  65
    Linking Chemistry with Physics: Arguments and Counterarguments. [REVIEW]Olimpia Lombardi - 2014 - Foundations of Chemistry 16 (3):181-192.
    The many-faced relationship between chemistry and physics is one of the most discussed topics in the philosophy of chemistry. In his recent book Reducing Chemistry to Physics. Limits, Models, Consequences, Hinne Hettema conceives this relationship as a reduction link, and devotes his work to defend this position on the basis of a “naturalized” concept of reduction. In the present paper I critically review three kinds of issues stemming from Hettema’s argumentation: philosophical, scientific and methodological.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  3.  72
    How Chemistry Shifts Horizons: Element, Substance, and the Essential.Joseph E. Earley - 2009 - Foundations of Chemistry 11 (2):65-77.
    In 1931 eminent chemist Fritz Paneth maintained that the modern notion of “element” is closely related to (and as “metaphysical” as) the concept of element used by the ancients (e.g., Aristotle). On that basis, the element chlorine (properly so-called) is not the elementary substance dichlorine, but rather chlorine as it is in carbon tetrachloride. The fact that pure chemicals are called “substances” in English (and closely related words are so used in other European languages) derives from philosophical compromises made by (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  4. Is Chemistry a Branch of Physics?Mario Bunge - 1982 - Zeitschrift Für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 13 (2):209-223.
    Summary Opinion is divided as to whether chemistry is reducible to physics. The problem can be given a satisfactory solution provided three conditions are met: that a science not be identified with its theories; that several notions of theory dependence be distinguished; and that quantum chemistry, rather than classical chemistry, be compared with physics. This paper proposes to perform all three tasks. It does so by analyzing the methodological concepts concerned as well as by examining the way (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  5. Chemistry and Physics: No Need for Metaphysical Glue. [REVIEW]Jaap Van Brakel - 2010 - Foundations of Chemistry 12 (2):123-136.
    Using the notorious bridge law “water is H 2 O” and the relation between molecular structure and quantum mechanics as examples, I argue that it doesn’t make sense to aim for specific definition(s) of intertheoretical or interdiscourse relation(s) between chemistry and physics (reduction, supervenience, what have you). Proposed definitions of interdiscourse and part-whole relations are interesting only if they provide insight in the variegated interconnected patchwork of theories and beliefs. There is “automatically” some sort of interdiscourse relation if different (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  6. Emergence in Chemistry: Chemistry as the Embodiment of Emergence. [REVIEW]Pier Luigi Luisi - 2002 - Foundations of Chemistry 4 (3):183-200.
    The main aim of the paper is to reinforce the notion that emergence is a basic characteristic of the molecular sciences in general and chemistry in particular. Although this point is well accepted, even in the primary reference on emergence, the keyword emergence is rarely utilized by chemists and molecular biologists and chemistry textbooks for undergraduates. The possible reasons for this situation are discussed. The paper first re-introduces the concept of emergence based on very simple geometrical forms; and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  7.  74
    Whence Chemistry?Robert C. Bishop - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 41 (2):171-177.
    Along with exploring some of the necessary conditions for the chemistry of our world given what we know about quantum mechanics, I will also discuss a different reductionist challenge than is usually considered in debates on the relationship of chemistry to physics. Contrary to popular belief, classical physics does not have a reductive relationship to quantum mechanics and some of the reasons why reduction fails between classical and quantum physics are the same as for why reduction fails between (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  8.  66
    Chemistry, Green Chemistry, and the Instrumental Valuation of Sustainability.Nathaniel Logar - 2011 - Minerva 49 (1):113-136.
    Using the Public Value Mapping framework, I address the values successes and failures of chemistry as compared to the emerging field of green chemistry, in which the promoters attempt to incorporate new and expanded values, such as health, safety, and environmental sustainability, to the processes of prioritizing and conducting chemistry research. I document how such values are becoming increasingly public. Moreover, analysis of the relations among the multiple values associated with green chemistry displays a greater internal (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  9.  30
    Chemistry and a Theoretical Model of Science: On the Occasion of a Recent Debate with the Christies. [REVIEW]Rein Vihalemm - 2005 - Foundations of Chemistry 7 (2):171-182.
    In the philosophy of chemistry a view is developed according to which laws of nature and scientific theories are peculiar in chemistry. This view was criticized in an earlier issue of the Foundations of Chemistry (Vihalemm, Foundation of Chemistry 5(1): 7–22, 2003) referring to an essay by Maureen and John Christie (Christie and Christie, in N. Bushan and S. Rosenfeld (Eds.), Of Minds and Molecules: New Philosophical Perspectives on Chemistry. Oxford University Press, New York, 2000, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  10.  12
    Chemistry as a Practical Science.Peeter Müürsepp - 2016 - Foundations of Chemistry 18 (3):213-223.
    This is an attempt to take a look at chemistry from the point of view of practical realism. Besides its social–historical and normative aspects, the latter involves a direct reference to experimental research. According to Edward Caldin chemistry depends on our being able to isolate pure substances with reproducible properties. Thus, the very basis of chemistry is practical. Even the laws of chemistry are not stable but are subject to correction. At the same time, these statements (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  11.  37
    How Chemistry Shifts Horizons: Element, Substance, and the Essential.Joseph E. Earley Sr - 2009 - Foundations of Chemistry 11 (2):65-77.
    In 1931 eminent chemist Fritz Paneth maintained that the modern notion of “element” is closely related to (and as “metaphysical” as) the concept of element used by the ancients (e.g., Aristotle). On that basis, the element chlorine (properly so-called) is not the elementary substance dichlorine, but rather chlorine as it is in carbon tetrachloride. The fact that pure chemicals are called “substances” in English (and closely related words are so used in other European languages) derives from philosophical compromises made by (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  12.  51
    Chemistry as a Practical Science: Edward Caldin Revisited.Peeter Müürsepp - 2016 - Foundations of Chemistry 18 (2):113-123.
    This is an attempt to take a look at chemistry from the point of view of practical realism. Besides its social–historical and normative aspects, the latter involves a direct reference to experimental research. According to Edward Caldin chemistry depends on our being able to isolate pure substances with reproducible properties. Thus, the very basis of chemistry is practical. Even the laws of chemistry are not stable but are subject to correction. At the same time, these statements (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13.  15
    Chemistry, Context and the Objects of Thought.Robert Prentner - 2017 - Foundations of Chemistry 19 (1):29-41.
    In this paper we wish to raise the following question: which conceptual obstacles need to be overcome to arrive at a scientific and theoretical understanding of the mind? In the course of this examination, we shall encounter methodological and explanatory challenges and discuss them from the point of view of the philosophy of chemistry and quantum mechanics. This will eventually lead us to a discussion of emergence and metaphysics, thereby focusing on the status of objects. The question remains whether (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  14.  27
    Linking Chemistry with Physics: A Reply to Lombardi.Hinne Hettema - 2014 - Foundations of Chemistry 16 (3):193-200.
    In this paper I reply to Olimpia Lombardi’s comment on my recent book Reducing Chemistry to Physics: Limits, Models, Consequences.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  15.  52
    Chemistry in Kant’s Opus Postumum.Michael Bennett McNulty - 2016 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 6 (1):64-95.
    In his Metaphysische Anfangsgründe der Naturwissenschaft (MAN), Kant claims that chemistry is an improper, though rational science. The chemistry to which Kant confers this status is the phlogistic chemistry of, for instance, Georg Stahl. In his Opus Postumum (OP), however, Kant espouses a broadly Lavoiserian conception of chemistry. In particular, Kant endorses Antoine Lavoisier's elements, oxygen theory of combustion, and role for the caloric. As Lavoisier's lasting contribution to chemistry, according to some histories of the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16. The Chemistry of Substances and the Philosophy of Mass Terms.J. Brakel - 1986 - Synthese 69 (3):291 - 324.
  17.  41
    Chemistry and the Problem of Pluralism in Science: An Analysis Concerning Philosophical and Scientific Disagreements.Rein Vihalemm - 2016 - Foundations of Chemistry 18 (2):91-102.
    Chemistry, especially its historical practice, has in the philosophy of science in recent decades attracted more and more attention, influencing the turn from the vision of science as a timeless logic-centred system of statements towards the history- and practice-centred approach. The problem of pluralism in science has become a popular topic in that context. Hasok Chang’s “active normative epistemic pluralism” manifested in his book Is water H2O? Evidence, realism and pluralism, pursuing an integrated study of history and philosophy of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  18.  66
    The Chemistry of Substances and the Philosophy of Mass Terms.Jaap Van Brakel - 1986 - Synthese 69 (3):291-324.
  19.  18
    Analytical Chemistry and the ‘Big’ Scientific Instrumentation Revolution.Davis Baird - 1993 - Annals of Science 50 (3):267-290.
    By a close examination of changes in analytical chemistry between the years 1920 and 1950, I document the case that natural science has undergone and continues to undergo a major revolution. The central feature of this transformation is the rise in importance of scientific instrumentation. Prior to 1920, analytical chemists determined the chemical constitution of some unknown by treating it with a series of known compounds and observing the kind of reactions it underwent. After 1950, analytical chemists determined the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  20.  35
    Has Chemistry Been at Least Approximately Reduced to Quantum Mechanics?Eric R. Scerri - 1994 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:160 - 170.
    Differing views on reduction are briefly reviewed and a suggestion is made for a working definition of 'approximate reduction'. Ab initio studies in quantum chemistry are then considered, including the issues of convergence and error bounds. This includes an examination of the classic studies on CH2 and the recent work on the Si2C molecule. I conclude that chemistry has not even been approximately reduced.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  21. Emergence and Reduction in Chemistry: Ontological or Epistemological Concepts?Lee McIntyre - 2007 - Synthese 155 (3):337-343.
    In this paper I argue that the ontological interpretation of the concepts of reduction and emergence is often misleading in the philosophy of science and should nearly always be eschewed in favor of an epistemological interpretation. As a paradigm case, an example is drawn from the philosophy of chemistry to illustrate the drawbacks of “ontological reduction” and “ontological emergence,” and the virtues of an epistemological interpretation of these concepts.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  22.  37
    Viewing Chemistry Through its Ways of Classifying.Wolfgang Lefèvre - 2012 - Foundations of Chemistry 14 (1):25-36.
    The focus of this contribution lies on eighteenth-century chemistry up to Lavoisier’s anti-phlogistic chemical system. Some main features of chemistry in this period will be examined by discussing classificatory practices and the understanding of the substances these practices imply. In particular, the question will be discussed of whether these practices can be regarded as natural historical practices and, hence, whether chemistry itself was a special natural history (part I). Furthermore, discussion of the famous Methode de nomenclature chimique (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  23.  49
    Green Chemistry: An Innovative Technology. [REVIEW]M. Kidwai & R. Mohan - 2004 - Foundations of Chemistry 7 (3):269-287.
    The drive towards clean technology in the chemical industry with an increasing emphasis on the reduction of waste at source requires a level of innovation and new technology that the chemical industry is beginning to adopt. The green chemistry revolution provides an enormous number of opportunities to discover and apply new synthetic approaches using alternative feedstocks; ecofriendly reaction conditions, energy minimizations and the design of less toxic and inherently safer chemicals. In this review exciting opportunities and some successful examples (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  24.  10
    Physical Chemistry: Neither Fish nor Fowl?Joachim Schummer - unknown
    The birth of a new discipline, called 'physical chemistry', is sometimes related to the names OSTWALD, ARRHENIUS and VAN'T HOFF and dated back to the year 1887, when OSTWALD founded the Zeitschrift für physikalische Chemie.[1] But as many historians have pointed out, the phrase 'physical chemistry' was widely used before that and the topics under investigation partially go back to Robert BOYLE's attempts to connect chemistry with concepts of mechanical philosophy.[2] The idea of a sudden birth of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  25.  32
    Aristotelian Chemistry: A Prelude to Duhemian Metaphysics.Paul Needham - 1996 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 27 (2):251-269.
    In 1904 Joachim published an influential paper dealing with 'Aristotle's Conception of Chemical Combination' which has provided the basis of much more recent studies. About the same time, Duhem developed what he regarded as an essentially Aristotelian view of chemistry, based on his understanding of phenomenological thermodynamics. He does not present a detailed textual analysis, but rather emphasises certain general ideas. Joachim's classic paper contains obscurities which I have been unable to fathom and theses which do not seem to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  26.  1
    Green Chemistry as Social Movement?Steve Breyman & Edward J. Woodhouse - 2005 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 30 (2):199-222.
    Are there circumstances under which scientists and engineers doing their ordinary jobs can be thought of as participants in a social movement? The technoscientists analyzed in this article are at the forefront of a new way of doing chemistry; they are attempting to redesign chemical products and synthesis pathways to significantly reduce health effects and environmental damage from industrial chemicals. Green chemistry practitioners and entrepreneurs now constitute a small minority of chemists and chemical engineers in the university, government, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  27.  56
    What is Life?: How Chemistry Becomes Biology.Addy Pross - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Livings things are so very strange -- The quest for a theory of life -- Understanding 'understanding' -- Stability and instability -- The knotty origin of life problem -- Biology's crisis of identity -- Biology is chemistry -- What is life?
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  28. Better Living Through Chemistry? A Reply to Savulescu and Persson on ‘Moral Enhancement’.Robert Sparrow - 2014 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (1):23-32.
    In ‘Moral Enhancement, Freedom, and the God Machine’, Savulescu and Persson argue that recent scientific findings suggest that there is a realistic prospect of achieving ‘moral enhancement’ and respond to Harris's criticism that this would threaten individual freedom and autonomy. I argue that although some pharmaceutical and neuro‐scientific interventions may influence behaviour and emotions in ways that we may be inclined to evaluate positively, describing this as ‘moral enhancement’ presupposes a particular, contested account, of what it is to act morally (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  29.  62
    Kant on Chemistry and the Application of Mathematics in Natural Science.Michael Bennett McNulty - 2014 - Kantian Review 19 (3):393-418.
    In his Metaphysische Anfangsgründe der Naturwissenschaft, Kant claims that chemistry is a science, but not a proper science (like physics), because it does not adequately allow for the application of mathematics to its objects. This paper argues that the application of mathematics to a proper science is best thought of as depending upon a coordination between mathematically constructible concepts and those of the science. In physics, the proper science that exhausts the a priori knowledge of objects of the outer (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  30.  38
    Quantum Chemistry: Classical Scientific Papers.Hinne Hettema - 2000 - World Scientific.
    J. Quantum Chemistry, 2000"It will have a lasting value for theoretical chemists and science historians".Structural Chemistry, 2000" is a finely produced, ...
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  31.  15
    Chemistry and the Engineering of Life Around 1900: Research and Reflections by Jacques Loeb.Ute Deichmann - 2009 - Biological Theory 4 (4):323-332.
    Dissatisfied with the descriptive and speculative methods of evolutionary biology of his time, the physiologist Jacques Loeb , best known for his “engineering” approach to biology, reflected on the possibilities of artificially creating life in the laboratory. With the objective of experimentally tackling one of the crucial questions of organic evolution, i.e., the origin of life from inanimate matter, he rejected claims made by contemporary scientists of having produced artificial life through osmotic growth processes in inorganic salt solutions. According to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  32.  16
    Neither Physics nor Chemistry: A History of Quantum Chemistry.Kostas Gavroglu & Ana Simões (eds.) - 2011 - MIT Press.
    In Neither Physics Nor Chemistry, Kostas Gavroglu and Ana Simoes examine the evolution of quantum chemistry into an autonomous discipline, tracing its development from the publication of early papers in the 1920s to the dramatic changes ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  33. The Autonomy of Chemistry: Old and New Problems. [REVIEW]Rein Vihalemm - 2011 - Foundations of Chemistry 13 (2):97-107.
    The autonomy of chemistry and the legitimacy of the philosophy of chemistry are usually discussed in the context of the issue of reduction of chemistry to physics, and defended making use of the failure of reductionistic claims. Until quite recent times a rather widespread viewpoint was, however, that the failure of reductionistic claims concerns actually epistemological aspect of reduction only, but the ontological reduction of chemistry to physics cannot be denied. The new problems of the autonomy (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  34. Life is Physics and Chemistry and Communication.Gunther Witzany - 2015 - In Guenther Witzany (ed.), DNA Habitats and Their RNA Inhabitants. pp. 1-9.
    Manfred Eigen extended Erwin Schroedinger’s concept of “life is physics and chemistry” through the introduction of information theory and cybernetic systems theory into “life is physics and chemistry and information.” Based on this assumption, Eigen developed the concepts of quasispecies and hypercycles, which have been dominant in molecular biology and virology ever since. He insisted that the genetic code is not just used metaphorically: it represents a real natural language.However, the basics of scientific knowledge changed dramatically within the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  35.  73
    Chemistry as the Science of the Transformation of Substances.J. Van Brakel - 1997 - Synthese 111 (3):253-282.
  36.  72
    Philosophy of Chemistry.Michael Weisberg, Paul Needham & Robin Hendry - 2011 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Chemistry is the study of the structure and transformation of matter. When Aristotle founded the field in the 4th century BCE, his conceptual grasp of the nature of matter was tailored to accommodate a relatively simple range of observable phenomena. In the 21st century, chemistry has become the largest scientific discipline, producing over half a million publications a year ranging from direct empirical investigations to substantial theoretical work. However, the specialized interest in the conceptual issues arising in (...), hereafter Philosophy of Chemistry, is a relatively recent addition to philosophy of science. Philosophy of chemistry has two major parts. In the first, conceptual issues arising within chemistry are carefully articulated and analyzed. Such questions which are internal to chemistry include the nature of substance, atomism, the chemical bond, and synthesis. In the second, traditional topics in philosophy of science such as realism, reduction, explanation, confirmation, and modeling are taken up within the context of chemistry. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  37.  76
    The Chemical Core of Chemistry I: A Conceptual Approach.Joachim Schummer - 1998 - Hyle 4 (2):129 - 162.
    Given the rich diversity of research fields usually ascribed to chemistry in a broad sense, the present paper tries to dig our characteristic parts of chemistry that can be conceptually distinguished from interdisciplinary, applied, and specialized subfields of chemistry, and that may be called chemistry in a very narrow sense, or 'the chemical core of chemistry'. Unlike historical, ontological, and 'anti-reductive' approaches, I use a conceptual approach together with some methodological implications that allow to develop (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  38. Patching Physics and Chemistry Together.Robert C. Bishop - 2005 - Philosophy of Science 72 (5):710-722.
    The "usual story" regarding molecular chemistry is that it is roughly an application of quantum mechanics. That is to say, quantum mechanics supplies everything necessary and sufficient, both ontologically and epistemologically, to reduce molecular chemistry to quantum mechanics. This is a reductive story, to be sure, but a key explanatory element of molecular chemistry, namely molecular structure, is absent from the quantum realm. On the other hand, typical characterizations of emergence, such as the unpredictability or inexplicability of (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  39.  9
    Chemistry as the Science of the Transformation of Substances.J. Van Brakel - 1997 - Synthese 111 (3):253-282.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  40.  37
    Emergence and Quantum Chemistry.Jean-Pierre Llored - 2012 - Foundations of Chemistry 14 (3):245-274.
    This paper first queries what type of concept of emergence, if any, could be connected with the different chemical activities subsumed under the label ‘quantum chemistry’. In line with Roald Hoffmann, we propose a ‘rotation to research laboratory’ in order to point out how practitioners hold a molecular whole, its parts, and the surroundings together within their various methods when exploring chemical transformation. We then identify some requisite contents that a concept of emergence must incorporate in order to be (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  41.  10
    Chemistry in a Physical Mode: Molecular Spectroscopy and the Emergence of NMR.Carsten Reinhardt - 2004 - Annals of Science 61 (1):1-32.
    In the 1940s and 1950s, nuclear magnetic resonance , one of the most important analytical techniques in chemistry, grew to maturity in the intermediate research field of chemical physics. Chemists and physicists adapted the new technology to the experimental culture of molecular spectroscopy which was based on a pragmatic experimental style. In molecular spectroscopy, the purpose of experiments was the establishment of methods that suited both the physicists' quest for precision and theoretical model building and the chemists' longing for (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  42.  54
    Philosophy of Chemistry and the Image of Science.Rein Vihalemm - 2007 - Foundations of Science 12 (3):223-234.
    The philosophical analysis of chemistry has advanced at such a pace during the last dozen years that the existence of philosophy of chemistry as an autonomous discipline cannot be doubted any more. The present paper will attempt to analyse the experience of philosophy of chemistry at the, so to say, meta-level. Philosophers of chemistry have especially stressed that all sciences need not be similar to physics. They have tried to argue for chemistry as its own (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  43.  7
    Thermodynamic Foundations of Physical Chemistry: Reversible Processes and Thermal Equilibrium Into the History.Raffaele Pisano, Abdelkader Anakkar, Emilio Marco Pellegrino & Maxime Nagels - 2019 - Foundations of Chemistry 21 (3):297-323.
    In the history of science, the birth of classical chemistry and thermodynamics produced an anomaly within Newtonian mechanical paradigm: force and acceleration were no longer citizens of new cited sciences. Scholars tried to reintroduce them within mechanistic approaches, as the case of the kinetic gas theory. Nevertheless, Thermodynamics, in general, and its Second Law, in particular, gradually affirmed their role of dominant not-reducible cognitive paradigms for various scientific disciplines: more than twenty formulations of Second Law—a sort of indisputable intellectual (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  40
    A Chemistry of Human Nature: Chemical Imagery in Hume’s Treatise.Tamás Demeter - 2017 - Early Science and Medicine 22 (2-3):208-228.
  45.  55
    Alchemy Vs. Chemistry: The Etymological Origins of a Historiographic Mistake1.William R. Newman & Lawrence M. Principe - 1998 - Early Science and Medicine 3 (1):32-65.
    The parallel usage of the two terms "alchemy" and "chemistry" by seventeenth-century writers has engendered considerable confusion among historians of science. Many historians have succumbed to the temptation of assuming that the early modern term "chemistry" referred to something like the modern discipline, while supposing that "alchemy" pertained to a different set of practices and beliefs, predominantly the art of transmuting base metals into gold. This paper provides the first exhaustive analysis of the two terms and their interlinguistic (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  46.  16
    Chemistry and Physiology in Their Historical and Philosophical Relations.Eduard Glas - 1979 - Delft University Press.
    On the whole our study has made a plea for the combined research into the history, methodology and philosophy of science. There is an intricate communication between these aspects of science, philosophy being both a fruit of scientific developments and a higher-level frame of reference for discussion on the inevicable metaphysical issues in science.As such philosophy can be very useful to science, but should never impose its ideas on the conduct of scientists . ... Zie: Summary.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  47.  26
    The Union of Chemistry and Physics.Hinne Hettema - 2017 - New York: Springer.
    This monograph deals with the interrelationship between chemistry and physics, and especially the role played by quantum chemistry as a theory in between these two disciplines. The author uses structuralist approach to explore the overlap between the two sciences, looking at their theoretical and ontological borrowings as well as their continuity. -/- The starting point of this book is that there is at least a form of unity between chemistry and physics, where the reduction relation is conceived (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48.  21
    Chemistry as the Science of the Transformation of Substances.J. Brakevanl - 1997 - Synthese 111 (3):253-282.
  49.  19
    Diagnostics in Computational Organic Chemistry.Grant Fisher - 2016 - Foundations of Chemistry 18 (3):241-262.
    Focusing on computational studies of pericyclic reactions from the late twentieth century into the twenty-first century, this paper argues that computational diagnostics is a key methodological development that characterize the management and coordination of plural approximation methods in computational organic chemistry. Predictive divergence between semi-empirical and ab initio approximation methods in the study of pericyclic reactions has issued in epistemic dissent. This has resulted in the use of diagnostics to unpack computational greyboxes in order to critically assess the effect (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  50.  16
    Quantum Chemistry and Organic Theory.William Goodwin - 2013 - Philosophy of Science 80 (5):1159-1169.
    In this essay I consider whether the theory of organic chemistry is reducible to the theory of quantum chemistry. Using philosophical machinery developed by James Woodward, I characterize the understanding provided by both theories. Then I argue that there are systematic reasons to suspect that quantum chemistry is incapable of supporting some of the significant explanations, predictions, and applications underwritten by an understanding of theoretical organic chemistry. Consequently, even should quantum chemistry be ‘reducible to’ quantum (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000