9 found
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  1. On Pleasure: A Reflection on Happiness From the Confucian and Daoist Perspectives.Chen Shaoming - 2010 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (2):179-195.
    This paper discusses the structural relationship between ideals on pleasure and pleasure as a human psychological phenomenon in Chinese thought. It describes the psychological phenomenon of pleasure, and compares different approaches by pre-Qin Confucian and Daoist scholars. It also analyzes its development in Song and Ming Confucianism. Finally, in the conclusion, the issue is transferred to a general understanding of happiness, so as to demonstrate the modern value of the classical ideological experience.
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  2.  14
    The Logic of Imagination: Classical Examples From Chinese Philosophy.Chen Shaoming - 2017 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 48 (2):68-79.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTThis article analyzes three well-known stories—the child about to fall in a well from Mencius, the butterfly dream in Zhuangzi, and the spear–shield contradiction in Han Feizi —to illustrate a type of philosophical argumentation that the author finds particularly inspiring but little explored in the reading of early Chinese texts. As opposed to the more speculative and abstract mode of philosophizing that has been largely imported from the West and that dominates at philosophy departments, a careful reflection on allegories, (...)
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  3.  56
    Tone Down a Little: Advice to Cultural Conservatism.Chen Shaoming - 1998 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 29 (4):63-72.
    Starting from the time the twentieth century embarked on the last ten years of its course, and following a great tumult as of "roaring mountains and raging seas" in the cultural domain, conservatism finally welcomed its age of felicity and bliss. The influence of conservatism, as superficially characterized by the Chinese Traditional Studies Heat , cannot compare with that of the radicalism that was characterized by the Culture Heat. But in scale—as opposed to the scale of other conservative movements in (...)
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  4.  5
    “I Lost Myself”: A Classical Idea of the Self.Chen Shaoming - 2017 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 48 (2):95-109.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTThis is a reflection on the notion of “self,” primarily on the basis of a story in the Zhuangzi in which the protagonist claims: “I lost myself.” Chen first reiterates the grammatical differences between the uses of 吾 and 我, and continues with a reflection on their philosophical meaning. He argues that the notion of “wo” is more spatial, connected to the body, and distinguished from others; “wu” is more temporal, related to one’s memory and self-understanding. The loss of (...)
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  5.  9
    More on the Legitimacy of "Chinese Philosophy".Chen Shaoming - 2005 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 37 (1):73-79.
  6.  8
    Endurance and Non-Endurance: From the Perspective of Virtue Ethics.Chen Shaoming & Zheng Shuhong - 2008 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (3):335 - 351.
    By analysing the two relevant psychological phenomena of "endurance" and "non-endurance," this essay aims to reveal the ethical implications of a Confucian approach, namely regarding non-endurance as an impulse of primary virtue. Based on this case study, the author then explores the significance of moral cultivation or psychological training in establishing moral personality and the complexities of such a process. Meanwhile, "love" in Confucian ethics means sympathy for the inferior rather than affection for the revered. Hopefully, this study may deepen (...)
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  7.  1
    A Phenomenological Analysis of Shame.Chen Shaoming - 2017 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 48 (2):55-67.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTThis article presents a phenomenological analysis of several Chinese notions of shame—embarrassment, chagrin, shame, and disgrace. It elaborates on their structural connections and related experiences, more particularly concerning interpersonal conditions and emotional or physical reactions. Chen focuses on the notion of moral shame, its connection to the Confucian tradition, and its weakening in the current society, due to ideational and technical circumstances, such as the increased sense of individual self and the booming of internet culture.
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  8.  1
    Further Reflections on the Methodology of Chinese Philosophical Research—Starting From Cashing in the “Bank-Note of Ideas”.Chen Shaoming - 2017 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 48 (2):80-94.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTThis paper compares speculative or textbook philosophy with kite flying risking to lose touch with the topic of reflection. The alternative that Chen defends here is a more experience-grounded, concrete, and imaginary reflection on less often discussed ideas and on allegories. He carves out this approach from four related disciplinary methodologies: the “philological” focus on textual matters, the “history of thought” focusing on past eras, “scholastic history” connecting past ideas with their future, and “history of philosophy” immediately searching Chinese (...)
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  9. Jiehuo 解惑 (Resolve Perplexity).Chen Shaoming - 2006 - Modern Philosophy 5.
     
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