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  1.  3
    Tubes, Randomness, and Brownian Motions: Or, How Engineers Learned to Start Worrying About Electronic Noise.Chen-Pang Yeang - 2011 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 65 (4):437-470.
    In this paper, we examine the pioneering research on electronic noise—the current fluctuations in electronic circuit devices due to their intrinsic physical characteristics rather than their defects—in Germany and the U.S. during the 1910s–1920s. Such research was not just another demonstration of the general randomness of the physical world Einstein’s work on Brownian motion had revealed. In contrast, we stress the importance of a particular engineering context to electronic noise studies: the motivation to design and improve high-gain thermionic-tube amplifiers for (...)
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  2.  12
    Kirchhoff’s Theory for Optical Diffraction, its Predecessor and Subsequent Development: The Resilience of an Inconsistent Theory.Chen-Pang Yeang & Jed Buchwald - 2016 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 70 (5):463-511.
    Kirchhoff’s 1882 theory of optical diffraction forms the centerpiece in the long-term development of wave optics, one that commenced in the 1820s when Fresnel produced an empirically successful theory based on a reinterpretation of Huygens’ principle, but without working from a wave equation. Then, in 1856, Stokes demonstrated that the principle was derivable from such an equation albeit without consideration of boundary conditions. Kirchhoff’s work a quarter century later marked a crucial, and widely influential, point for he produced Fresnel’s results (...)
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  3.  22
    Understanding Noise in Twentieth-Century Physics and Engineering.Chen-Pang Yeang - 2016 - Perspectives on Science 24 (1):1-6.
    Noise is a common experience in the contemporary world. Din from traffic, construction sites, factories, and neighbors bother urban residents. Radio listeners, television watchers, and mobile phone users have to endure statics and fading from time to time. Music lovers have debated whether jazz, atonal composition, rock and roll, rap, and abstract expressionism are art or nuisance. Scientists try to retrieve genuine signals from fluctuating data. Engineers design devices, software, or systems to filter out disturbance to the normal functioning of (...)
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  4.  20
    Engineering Entanglement, Conceptualizing Quantum Information.Chen-Pang Yeang - 2011 - Annals of Science 68 (3):325-350.
    Summary Proposed by Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen (EPR) in 1935, the entangled state has played a central part in exploring the foundation of quantum mechanics. At the end of the twentieth century, however, some physicists and mathematicians set aside the epistemological debates associated with EPR and turned it from a philosophical puzzle into practical resources for information processing. This paper examines the origin of what is known as quantum information. Scientists had considered making quantum computers and employing entanglement in communications (...)
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  5.  9
    What Heinrich Hertz Discovered About Electric Waves in 1887–1888.Jed Buchwald, Chen-Pang Yeang, Noah Stemeroff, Jenifer Barton & Quinn Harrington - 2021 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 75 (2):125-171.
    Among the most influential and well-known experiments of the 19th century was the generation and detection of electromagnetic radiation by Heinrich Hertz in 1887–1888, work that bears favorable comparison for experimental ingenuity and influence with that by Michael Faraday in the 1830s and 1840s. In what follows, we pursue issues raised by what Hertz did in his experimental space to produce and to detect what proved to be an extraordinarily subtle effect. Though he did provide evidence for the existence of (...)
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  6.  22
    From Modernizing the Chinese Language to Information Science: Chao Yuen Ren’s Route to Cybernetics.Chen-Pang Yeang - 2017 - Isis 108 (3):553-580.
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  7.  5
    Correction To: What Heinrich Hertz Discovered About Electric Waves in 1887–1888.Jed Buchwald, Chen-Pang Yeang, Noah Stemeroff, Jenifer Barton & Quinn Harrington - 2021 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 75 (2):173-173.
    Unfortunately, only after online first article publication, it was noticed that the first four sentences in footnote two were incorrect.
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  8.  16
    Two Mathematical Approaches to Random Fluctuations.Chen-Pang Yeang - 2016 - Perspectives on Science 24 (1):45-72.
    Randomness, uncertainty, and lack of regularity had concerned savants for a long time. As early as the seventeenth century, Blaise Pascal conceived the arithmetic of chance for gambling. At the height of positional astronomy, mathematicians developed a theory of errors to cope with random deviations in astronomical observations. In the nineteenth century, pioneers of statistics employed probabilistic calculus to define “normal” and “pathological” in the distribution of social characters, while physicists devised the statistical-mechanical interpretation of thermodynamic effects. By the end (...)
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  9.  10
    Shaul Katzir. The Beginnings of Piezoelectricity: A Study in Mundane Physics. Xiii + 246 Pp., Illus., App., Bibl., Index. Dordrecht: Springer, 2006. $175. [REVIEW]Chen-Pang Yeang - 2011 - Isis 102 (1):207-208.
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