Order:
  1.  47
    Both Earlier Times and the Future Are “Front”: The Distinction Between Time- and Ego-Reference-Points in Mandarin Speakers’ Temporal Representation.Chengli Xiao, Mengya Zhao & Lei Chen - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (3):1026-1040.
    Mandarin speakers, like most other language speakers around the world, use spatial terms to talk about time. However, the direction of their mental temporal representation along the front-back axis remains controversial because they use the spatial term “front” to refer to both earlier times and the future. Although the linguistic distinction between time- and ego-reference-point spatiotemporal metaphors in Mandarin suggests a promising clarification of the above controversy, there is little empirical evidence verifying this distinction. In this study, Mandarin speakers’ time- (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  28
    Reference Directions and Reference Objects in Spatial Memory of a Briefly Viewed Layout.Weimin Mou, Chengli Xiao & Timothy P. McNamara - 2008 - Cognition 108 (1):136-154.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  3.  4
    Dual Systems for Spatial Updating in Immediate and Retrieved Environments: Evidence From Bias Analysis.Chuanjun Liu & Chengli Xiao - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Do People Regard Robots as Human-Like Social Partners? Evidence From Perspective-Taking in Spatial Descriptions.Chengli Xiao, Liufei Xu, Yuqing Sui & Renlai Zhou - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Spatial communications are essential to the survival and social interaction of human beings. In science fiction and the near future, robots are supposed to be able to understand spatial languages to collaborate and cooperate with humans. However, it remains unknown whether human speakers regard robots as human-like social partners. In this study, human speakers describe target locations to an imaginary human or robot addressee under various scenarios varying in relative speaker–addressee cognitive burden. Speakers made equivalent perspective choices to human and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark