Results for 'Chess'

239 found
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  1.  8
    Behavioral Individuality in Early Childhood.A. Thomas, H. Birch, S. Chess, M. Hertzig & S. Korn - 1965 - British Journal of Educational Studies 14 (1):110-110.
  2.  18
    Let Us Consider the Roles of Temperament and of Fortuitous Events.Stella Chess - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (1):21-22.
  3.  12
    What Do We Learn From the Strange Situation?Stella Chess - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (1):148.
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  4. Social Policy and Cognitive Enhancement: Lessons From Chess.Emilian Mihailov & Julian Savulescu - 2018 - Neuroethics 11 (2):115-127.
    Should the development of pharmacological cognitive enhancers raise worries about doping in cognitively demanding activities? In this paper, we argue against using current evidence relating to enhancement to justify a ban on cognitive enhancers using the example of chess. It is a mistake to assume that enhanced cognitive functioning on psychometric testing is transferable to chess performance because cognitive expertise is highly complex and in large part not merely a function of the sum specific sub-processes. A deeper reason (...)
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  5.  96
    Intuitions Without Concepts Lose the Game: Mindedness in the Art of Chess[REVIEW]Barbara Montero & C. D. A. Evans - 2011 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (2):175-194.
    To gain insight into human nature philosophers often discuss the inferior performance that results from deficits such as blindsight or amnesia. Less often do they look at superior abilities. A notable exception is Herbert Dreyfus who has developed a theory of expertise according to which expert action generally proceeds automatically and unreflectively. We address one of Dreyfus’s primary examples of expertise: chess. At first glance, chess would seem an obvious counterexample to Dreyfus’s view since, clearly, chess experts (...)
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  6. Chess Composition as an Art.Miro Brada - manuscript
    The article presents the chess composition as a logical art, with concrete examples. It began with Arabic mansuba, and later evolved to new-strategy designed by Italian Alberto Mari. The redefinition of mate (e.g. mate with a free field) or a theme to quasi-pseudo theme, opens the new space for combinations, and enables to connect it with other fields like computer science. The article was exhibited in Holland Park, W8 6LU, The Ice House between 18. Oct - 3. Nov. 2013.
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  7.  50
    An Active Symbols Theory of Chess Intuition.Alexandre Linhares - 2005 - Minds and Machines 15 (2):131-181.
    The well-known game of chess has traditionally been modeled in artificial intelligence studies by search engines with advanced pruning techniques. The models were thus centered on an inference engine manipulating passive symbols in the form of tokens. It is beyond doubt, however, that human players do not carry out such processes. Instead, chess masters instead carry out perceptual processes, carefully categorizing the chunks perceived in a position and gradually building complex dynamic structures to represent the subtle pressures embedded (...)
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  8.  41
    Expertise in Complex Decision Making: The Role of Search in Chess 70 Years After de Groot.Michael H. Connors, Bruce D. Burns & Guillermo Campitelli - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (8):1567-1579.
    One of the most influential studies in all expertise research is de Groot’s (1946) study of chess players, which suggested that pattern recognition, rather than search, was the key determinant of expertise. Many changes have occurred in the chess world since de Groot’s study, leading some authors to argue that the cognitive mechanisms underlying expertise have also changed. We decided to replicate de Groot’s study to empirically test these claims and to examine whether the trends in the data (...)
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  9.  58
    The Predictive Mind and Chess-Playing: A Reply to Shand.Matteo Colombo & Jan Sprenger - 2014 - Analysis 74 (4):603-608.
    In a recent Analysis piece, John Shand (2014) argues that the Predictive Theory of Mind provides a unique explanation for why one cannot play chess against oneself. On the basis of this purported explanatory power, Shand concludes that we have an extra reason to believe that PTM is correct. In this reply, we first rectify the claim that one cannot play chess against oneself; then we move on to argue that even if this were the case, Shand’s argument (...)
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  10.  61
    Chess, Imagination, and Perceptual Understanding.Paul Coates - 2013 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 73:211-242.
    Chess is sometimes referred to as a ‘mind-sport’. Yet, in obvious ways, chess is very unlike physical sports such as tennis and soccer; it doesn't require the levels of fitness and athleticism necessary for such sports. Nor does it involve the sensory-governed, skilled behaviour required in activities such as juggling or snooker. Nevertheless, I suggest, chess is closer than it may at first seem to some of these sporting activities. In particular, there are interesting connections between the (...)
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  11.  24
    Chess & Schizophrenia: Murphy V Mr Endon, Beckett V Bion. [REVIEW]Gary Winship - 2011 - Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (4):339-351.
    This paper reconvenes Samuel Beckett’s psychotherapy with Wilfred Bion during 1934–1936 during which time Beckett’s conceived and began writing this second novel, Murphy . Based on Beckett’s visits to the Bethlem & Maudsley Hospital and his observation of the male nurses, the climax of Murphy is a chess match between Mr Endon (a male schizophrenic patient) and Murphy (a male psychiatric nurse). The precise notation of the Endon v Murphy chess match tells us that the Beckett intended it (...)
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  12.  45
    Chess and the Conscious Mind: Why Dreyfus and McDowell Got It Wrong.Barbara Gail Montero - 2019 - Mind and Language 34 (3):376-392.
    Mind &Language, Volume 34, Issue 3, Page 376-392, June 2019.
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  13.  28
    Specialization Effect and Its Influence on Memory and Problem Solving in Expert Chess Players.Merim Bilalić, Peter McLeod & Fernand Gobet - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (6):1117-1143.
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  14.  36
    Institutions as Dispositions: Searle, Smith and the Metaphysics of Blind Chess.Michaël Bauwens - 2018 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 48 (3):254-272.
    This paper addresses the question what the fundamental nature and mode of being of institutional reality is. Besides the recent debate with Tony Lawson, Barry Smith is also one of the relatively few authors to have explicitly challenged John Searle's social ontology on this metaphysical question, with Smith's realism requirement for institutions conflicting with Searle's requirement of a one-world naturalism. This paper proposes that an account of institutions as powers or dispositions is not only congenial to Searle's general account, but (...)
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  15. Chess is Not a Game.Deborah P. Vossen - 2008 - In Benjamin Hale (ed.), Philosophy Looks at Chess. Chicago and La Salle, Illinois: Open Court Press. pp. 191-208.
    As described in Benjamin Hale’s Introduction to “Philosophy Looks at Chess”: -/- “Deb Vossen asks whether chess can rightly be considered a game in the first place. She concludes, much to the surprise of many readers, that chess is not a game. Her evocative claim turns on a distinction between a game and the idea of a game, which evolved out of Bernard Suits’s phenomenally underappreciated work The Grasshopper: Games, Life and Utopia. She advances this position by (...)
     
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  16.  24
    They Do What They Are Told to Do: The Influence of Instruction on (Chess) Expert Perception—Commentary on Linhares and Brum (2007).Merim Bilalić & Fernand Gobet - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (5):743-747.
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  17.  78
    Chess as a Model of Language.L. Jonathan Cohen - 1982 - Philosophia 11 (1-2):51-87.
  18.  2
    When the Solution Is on the Doorstep: Better Solving Performance, but Diminished Aha! Experience for Chess Experts on the Mutilated Checkerboard Problem.Merim Bilalić, Mario Graf, Nemanja Vaci & Amory H. Danek - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (8).
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  19.  22
    Should Chess and Other Mind Sports Be Regarded as Sports?Filip Kobiela - 2018 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 45 (3):279-295.
    ABSTRACTIn the philosophy of sport, an opinion that chess is in fact not sports because it lacks physical skills is a standard position. I call the argument that leads to this conclusion a mind sport syllogism. Its analysis enables me to explicate four possible positions concerning the sport-status of chess. Apart from the standard position, which excludes chess from the sport family, I also present analysis of other possible positions, which – for various reasons – do not (...)
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  20.  72
    Expert and “Novice” Problem Solving Strategies in Chess: Sixty Years of Citing de Groot (1946).Fernand Gobet, Peter McLeod & Merim Bilalić - 2008 - Thinking and Reasoning 14 (4):395-408.
    In a famous study of expert problem solving, de Groot (1946/1978) examined how chess players found the best move. He reported that there was little difference in the way that the best players (Grand Masters) and very good players (Candidate Masters) searched the board. Although this result has been regularly cited in studies of expertise, it is frequently misquoted. It is often claimed that de Groot found no difference in the way that experts and novices investigate a problem. Comparison (...)
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  21.  41
    Expert and “Novice” Problem Solving Strategies in Chess: Sixty Years of Citing de Groot (1946).Merim Bilali - 2008 - Thinking and Reasoning 14 (4):395 – 408.
    In a famous study of expert problem solving, de Groot (1946/1978) examined how chess players found the best move. He reported that there was little difference in the way that the best players (Grand Masters) and very good players (Candidate Masters) searched the board. Although this result has been regularly cited in studies of expertise, it is frequently misquoted. It is often claimed that de Groot found no difference in the way that experts and novices investigate a problem. Comparison (...)
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  22.  43
    Predictive Mind, Cognition, and Chess.J. Shand - 2014 - Analysis 74 (2):244-249.
    According to the ambitious Predictive Theory of the Mind the brain generates models that it tests against experience and corrects to makes them evermore probably accurate of encountered experience. It neatly explains why we cannot tickle ourselves. The convincingness of that example is compromised by its essentially non-cognitive nature whereby an explanation not involving predictive models might do just as well. More telling confirmation of the theory is the essentially cognitive phenomenon of our inability to play chess against ourselves. (...)
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  23.  4
    Hybrid Online and Offline Reinforcement Learning for Tibetan Jiu Chess.Xiali Li, Zhengyu Lv, Licheng Wu, Yue Zhao & Xiaona Xu - 2020 - Complexity 2020:1-11.
    In this study, hybrid state-action-reward-state-action and Q-learning algorithms are applied to different stages of an upper confidence bound applied to tree search for Tibetan Jiu chess. Q-learning is also used to update all the nodes on the search path when each game ends. A learning strategy that uses SARSAλ and Q-learning algorithms combining domain knowledge for a feedback function for layout and battle stages is proposed. An improved deep neural network based on ResNet18 is used for self-play training. Experimental (...)
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  24.  30
    Pattern Recognition in Computers and the Human Brain:: With Special Application to Chess Playing Machines.Roland Puccetti - 1974 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 25 (2):137-154.
    1 Matching Templates and Feature Analysers. 2 Modes of Perception in Left and Right Cerebral Hemispheres. 3 Identification and Recognition. 4 Chess Plying Machines.
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  25.  57
    Another Go at Musical Profundity: Stephen Davies and the Game of Chess.Peter Kivy - 2003 - British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (4):401-411.
    I have argued previously that the art of absolute music, unlike, for example, the art of literature, is not capable of profundity, which I characterized as treating a profound subject matter, at the highest artistic level, in a manner appropriate to its profundity. Stephen Davies has recently argued that there is another way of being profound, which he calls non-propositional profundity, and for which chess provides his principal example. He argues, further, that absolute music also exhibits this non-propositional profundity. (...)
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  26.  2
    Exile, Statelessness, and Migration: Playing Chess with History From Hannah Arendt to Isaiah Berlin.Chris Irwin - forthcoming - The European Legacy:1-3.
    Seyla Benhabib’s Exile, Statelessness, and Migration: Playing Chess with History from Hannah Arendt to Isaiah Berlin is a complex and remarkable book that defies easy categorization. While the titl...
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  27.  5
    Typical Expression Of Cognitive Dissonance And Consonance In The Course Of Argumentation Among Primary-School Children Playing Chess.Ruben K. Mirzakhanyan, Srbuhi R. Gevorgyan, Vladimir S. Karapetyan, A. M. Dallakyan & Asya S. Berberyan - 2019 - Wisdom 13 (2):75-84.
    The research aims to reveal the typical expressions of cognitive dissonance and consonance among the primary-school children by their argumentations upon their deed. The relevance of the research stems from the applicability of the study of the phenomena of dissonance and consonance, which inherently emerge in the sphere of argumentation among the children who study how to play chess. Cognitive dissonance and consonance in the sphere of argumentation in the course of the game of chess are gradually transforming (...)
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  28.  66
    Chocolate and Chess (Unlocking Lakatos). [REVIEW]John Kadvany - 2012 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 42 (2):276-286.
    Chocolate and Chess (Unlocking Lakatos) tells the fascinating story of Imre Lakatos’ life in Hungary before his flight to England following the failed 1956 Hungarian Revolution. The book focuses on Lakatos’ role as a political functionary under Hungarian Stalinism, and compiles what is known of Lakatos’ role in the induced suicide of a young woman, Éva Iszák, at the end of World War II. This historical and biographical study provides essential background for appreciating Lakatos’ cross-cultural role as a philosopher (...)
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  29.  45
    Knowledge Discovery in Chess Using an Aesthetics Approach. Iqbal - 2012 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 46 (1):73-90.
    Computational aesthetics is a relatively new subfield of artificial intelligence (AI). It includes research that enables computers to "recognize" (and evaluate) beauty in various domains such as visual art, music, and games. Aside from the benefit this gives to humans in terms of creating and appreciating art in these domains, there are perhaps also philosophical implications about the nature and "mechanics" of aesthetic perception in humans. We can, potentially, learn more about ourselves as we replicate or simulate this ability in (...)
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  30.  53
    On the Philosophical Dimensions of Chess.Arto Siitonen - 1998 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 41 (4):455 – 475.
    The paper discusses the relation between chess and philosophy, examining, among other things, how far chess might reveal important features of philosophical problemanalysis and argumentation. There is a plurality of scientific, philosophical, and other perspectives from which chess can be viewed. Some attention must be drawn to these various ways of conceptualizing the game, but the main emphasis of the paper lies in uncovering certain philosophically- and metaphilosophically- relevant basic assumptions of chess. It is argued that (...)
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  31. Controlling Gaze, Chess Play and Seduction in Dance: Phenomenological Analysis of the Natural Attitude of the Body in Modern Ballroom Dance.Gediminas Karoblis - 2007 - Janus Head 9 (2):329-343.
    The article introduces the phenomenological idea of ‘natural attitude’ in the field of dance. Three phenomena, which very clearly show the embodiment of the natural attitude and its resistance to the requirements of dance, are analyzed. The ‘controlling gaze’ is the natural tendency to look at the limbs and follow their movements instead of proprioceptive control. The ‘chess play’ is a natural tendency of moving on the flat surface and ignoring the volume of movement. The ‘seduction’ is a natural (...)
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  32.  24
    Chess, Games, and Flies.Stefano Franchi - 2005 - Essays in Philosophy 6 (1):6.
    Research in Artificial Intelligence has always had a very strong relationship with games and game- playing, and especially with chess. Workers in AI have always denied that this interest was more than purely accidental. Parlor games, they claimed, became a favorite topic of interest because they provided the ideal test case for any simulation of intelligence. Chess is the Drosophila of AI, it was said, with reference to the fruit-fly whose fast reproductive cycle made it into a favorite (...)
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  33.  42
    Duchamp's “Mechanistic Sculptures”: Art, Nudes and the Game of Chess.Gary Banham - 1999 - Angelaki 4 (3):181 – 190.
    In this paper I present some reasons for seeing Duchamp's ready-mades as part of the history of sculpture and relate them to his engagement with both nudes and chess motifs.
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  34.  19
    How Intellectual is Chess? -- A Reply to Howard.Merim Bilalić & Peter Mcleod - 2006 - Journal of Biosocial Science 38 (3):419-421.
    Howard's (2005) claim that male dominance in chess is 'consistent with the evolutionary psychology view that males predominate at high achievement levels at least partly because of ability differences' (p. 378) is based on the premise that top level chess skill depends on a high level of IQ and visuospatial abilities. This premise is not supported by empirical evidence. In 1927 Djakow et al. first showed that world-class chess players do not have exceptional intellectual abilities. This finding (...)
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  35.  21
    Chess Isn't Tough Enough: Better Games for Mind-Machine Competition.Selmer Bringsjord - unknown
    That Strong AI is still alive may have a lot to do with its avoidance of true tests. When Kasparov sits down to face the meanest chessbot in town, he has the deck stacked against him: his play may involve super-computation, but we know that perfect chess can be played by a nite-state automaton, so Kasparov loses if the engineers are su - ciently clever : : : (Bringsjord, 1997b), p. 9; para-.
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  36.  16
    Expertise and Error-Making in Chess.Maksymilian T. Madelr - manuscript
    The aim of this paper is to illustrate, in some detail, the phenomenon of chess expertise and the making of errors by chess experts. In doing so, this paper also aims to reveal the close relationship between expertise and error making in chess. Finally, the paper aims to show how understanding that integral relationship can assist in the creation of pedagogical methods that can minimize error making, while also maximizing expertise. The analysis may provide some assistance in (...)
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  37.  64
    Philosophy Looks at Chess.Benjamin Hale (ed.) - 2008 - Open Court Press.
    This book offers a collection of contemporary essays that explore philosophical themes at work in chess. This collection includes essays on the nature of a game, the appropriateness of chess as a metaphor for life, and even deigns to query whether Garry Kasparov might—just might—be a cyborg. In twelve unique essays, contributed by philosophers with a broad range of expertise in chess, this book poses both serious and playful questions about this centuries-old pastime. -/- Perhaps more interestingly, (...)
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  38. Exile, Statelessness, and Migration: Playing Chess with History From Hannah Arendt to Isaiah Berlin.Seyla Benhabib - 2018 - Princeton University Press.
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  39.  62
    Understanding Beyond Grasping Propositions: A Discussion of Chess and Fish.Daniel A. Wilkenfeld & Jennifer K. Hellmann - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 48:46-51.
    In this paper, we argue that, contra Strevens (2013), understanding in the sciences is sometimes partially constituted by the possession of abilities; hence, it is not (in such cases) exhausted by the understander’s bearing a particular psychological or epistemic relationship to some set of structured propositions. Specifically, the case will be made that one does not really understand why a modeled phenomenon occurred unless one has the ability to actually work through (meaning run and grasp at each step) a model (...)
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  40.  19
    Differences Between High Vs. Low Performance Chess Players in Heart Rate Variability During Chess Problems.Juan P. Fuentes-García, Santos Villafaina, Daniel Collado-Mateo, Ricardo de la Vega, Pedro R. Olivares & Vicente Javier Clemente-Suárez - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  41.  12
    Mechanisms and Neural Basis of Object and Pattern Recognition: A Study with Chess Experts.Merim Bilalić, Robert Langner, Michael Erb & Wolfgang Grodd - 2010 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 139 (4):728-742.
  42.  27
    Visualization, Pattern Recognition, and Forward Search: Effects of Playing Speed and Sight of the Position on Grandmaster Chess Errors.Christopher F. Chabris & Eliot S. Hearst - 2003 - Cognitive Science 27 (4):637-648.
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  43.  12
    Human Versus Machine Thinking: The Story of Chess[REVIEW]Jonathan St B. T. Evans - 2018 - Thinking and Reasoning 24 (4):498-504.
  44.  26
    Expert Vs. Novice Differences in the Detection of Relevant Information During a Chess Game: Evidence From Eye Movements.Heather Sheridan & Eyal M. Reingold - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  45.  14
    Playing Off the Curve - Testing Quantitative Predictions of Skill Acquisition Theories in Development of Chess Performance.Robert Gaschler, Johanna Progscha, Kieran Smallbone, Nilam Ram & Merim Bilalić - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  46.  22
    How Law is Like Chess.Andrei Marmor - 2006 - Legal Theory 12 (4):347-371.
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  47.  97
    Chess As An Art Form.P. N. Humble - 1993 - British Journal of Aesthetics 33 (1):59-66.
  48.  1
    "ARGUMENT IS WAR"-Or is It a Game of Chess? Multiple Meanings in the Analysis of Implicit Metaphors.David Ritchie - 2003 - Metaphor and Symbol 18 (2):125-146.
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  49.  14
    On the Effect of Chess Training on Scholastic Achievement.William M. Bart - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  50.  12
    Language and the Game of Chess.Dominique Ducard - 2017 - Semiotica 2017 (214):199-217.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Semiotica Jahrgang: 2017 Heft: 214 Seiten: 199-217.
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