Search results for 'Children and philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. George Ghanotakis, Matthew Lipman & Canadian Institute of Philosophy for Children (1987). Encouraging Children to Be Thoughtful Questions and Answers : A Dialogue with Dr. Matthew Lipman. Canadian Institute of Philosophy for Children.
  2. Matthew Lipman & Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children (1977). Harry Stottlemeier's Discovery. Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children.
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  3. Matthew Lipman, Frederick S. Oscanyan, Ann Margaret Sharp & Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children (1976). Lisa.
     
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  4. Matthew Lipman, Ann Margaret Sharp & Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children (1978). Suki.
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  5. Kizel Arie (2016). Kizel, A. (2016). “Pedagogy Out of Fear of Philosophy as a Way of Pathologizing Children”. Journal of Unschooling and Alternative Learning, Vol. 10, No. 20, Pp. 28 – 47. Journal of Unschooling and Alternative Learning 10 (20):28 – 47.
    The article conceptualizes the term Pedagogy of Fear as the master narrative of educational systems around the world. Pedagogy of Fear stunts the active and vital educational growth of the young person, making him/her passive and dependent upon external disciplinary sources. It is motivated by fear that prevents young students—as well as teachers—from dealing with the great existential questions that relate to the essence of human beings. One of the techniques of the Pedagogy of Fear is the internalization of the (...)
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  6.  5
    Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton (forthcoming). From Harry to Philosophy Park: The Development of Philosophy for Children Resources in Australia. In Maughn Rollins Gregory, Joanna Haynes & Karin Murris (eds.), The Routledge International Handbook of Philosophy for Children. Routledge
    We offer an overview of the development and production of the diverse range of Australian P4C literature since the introduction of philosophy in schools in the early 1980s. The events and debates surrounding this literature can be viewed as an historical narrative that highlights different philosophical, educational, and strategic positions on the role of curriculum material and resources in the philosophy classroom. We argue that if we place children’s literature and purpose-written materials in opposition to one another, (...)
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  7.  2
    Arie Kizel (2014). Communication Discourse and Cyberspace: Challenges to Philosophy for Children. Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children 20 (3-4):40 – 44.
    This article addresses the principal challenges the philosophy for children (P4C) educator/practitioner faces today, particularly in light of the multi-channel communication environment that threatens to undermine the philosophical enterprise as a whole and P4C in particular. It seeks to answer the following questions: a) What status does P4C hold as promoting a community of inquiry in an era in which the school discourse finds itself in growing competition with a communication discourse driven by traditional media tools?; b) What (...)
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  8.  21
    Riku Välitalo, Hannu Juuso & Ari Sutinen (2016). Philosophy for Children as an Educational Practice. Studies in Philosophy and Education 35 (1):79-92.
    During the past 40 years, the Philosophy for Children movement has developed a dialogical framework for education that has inspired people both inside and outside academia. This article concentrates on analysing the historical development in general and then taking a more rigorous look at the recent discourse of the movement. The analysis proceeds by examining the changes between the so-called first and second generation, which suggests that Philosophy for Children is adapting to a postmodern world by (...)
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    Karin Murris (2016). The Philosophy for Children Curriculum: Resisting ‘Teacher Proof’ Texts and the Formation of the Ideal Philosopher Child. Studies in Philosophy and Education 35 (1):63-78.
    The philosophy for children curriculum was specially written by Matthew Lipman and colleagues for the teaching of philosophy by non-philosophically educated teachers from foundation phase to further education colleges. In this article I argue that such a curriculum is neither a necessary, not a sufficient condition for the teaching of philosophical thinking. The philosophical knowledge and pedagogical tact of the teacher remains salient, in that the open-ended and unpredictable nature of philosophical enquiry demands of teachers to think (...)
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  10.  16
    Arie Kizel (2015). Philosophy with Children, the Poverty Line, and Socio-Philosophic Sensitivity. Childhood and Philosophy 11 (21):139-162.
    A philosophy with children community of inquiry encourage children to develop a philosophical sensitivity that entails awareness of abstract questions related to human existence. When it operates, it can allow insight into significant philosophical aspects of various situations and their analysis. This article seeks to contribute to the discussion of philosophical sensitivity by adducing an additional dimension—namely, the development of a socio-philosophical sensitivity by means of a philosophical community of inquiry focused on texts linked to these themes (...)
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  11.  9
    Charles Bingham (2015). Philosophy for Children as a Teaching Movement in an Era of Too Much Learning. Childhood and Philosophy 11 (22):223-240.
    In this article, I contextualize the community of inquiry approach, and Philosophy for Children, within the current milieu of education. Specifically, I argue that whereas former scholarship on Philosophy for Children had a tendency to critique the problems of teacher authority and knowledge transmission, we must now consider subtler, learner-centered scenarios of education as a threat to Philosophy for Children. I begin by offering a personal anecdote about my own experience attending a ‘reverse-integrated’ elementary (...)
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  12. John Peter Portelli & Ronald F. Reed (eds.) (1995). Children, Philosophy, and Democracy. Detselig Enterprises.
     
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  13. Maria Miraglia (2014). Philosophy for Children and Territorial Educational Laboratories: A Succeed Experiment. Childhood and Philosophy 9 (18):381-400.
    The article examines the need to increase an education toward the development of complex thinking in urban areas where there is a considerable amount of social unrest. The school often fails to bridge the gap between educator/education and learner and this happens in particular when it comes to kids ‘disadvantaged’. The P4C is a pedagogical method that can heal this divide, inter alia, through its dialogic practice. The practice of philosophy can became a way to bridge the sense of (...)
     
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  14.  8
    Arie Kizel (2015). “Life Goes on Even If There’s a Gravestone”: Philosophy with Children and Adolescents on Virtual Memorial Sites. Childhood and Philosophy 10 (20):421-443.
    All over the Internet, many websites operate dealing with collective and personal memory. The sites relevant to collective memory deal with structuring the memory of social groups and they comprise part of “civil religion”. The sites that deal with personal memory memorialize people who have died and whose family members or friends or other members of their community have an interest in preserving their memory. This article offers an analysis of an expanded philosophical discourse that took place over a two-year (...)
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  15.  45
    Ann Margaret Sharp, Ronald F. Reed & Matthew Lipman (eds.) (1992). Studies in Philosophy for Children: Harry Stottlemeier's Discovery. Temple University Press.
    In this first part, Matthew Lipman offers the reader a glimpse at the thought processes that resulted in Philosophy for Children and, in so doing, ...
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  16.  14
    Caroline Schaffalitzky de Muckadell (2013). Why Philosophy? Aims of Philosophy with Children and Aims of Academic Philosophy. SATS 14 (2).
    While professional philosophers are often reluctant to address the issue of the aims of philosophy, the field of philosophy with children is abundant with articulated aims which tend to be more concrete and ambitious than those of academic philosophy. Is this asymmetry a problem? And how are we to think about the aims of philosophy with children? This article argues that not much will be gained from looking to academic philosophy because discussions here (...)
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  17.  17
    Ben Gorman (2012). Review of Philosophy in Children's Literature. [REVIEW] Questions 12:17-18.
    Ben Gorman reviews Philosophy in Children’s Literature by Peter R. Costello.
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  18.  3
    Lizzy Lewis & Nick Chandley (eds.) (2012). Philosophy for Children Through the Secondary Curriculum. Continuum International Pub. Group.
    Philosophy for Children (P4C) is an approach to learning and teaching that aims to develop reasoning and judgement. Students learn to listen to and respect their peers' opinions, think creatively and work together to develop a deeper understanding of concepts central to their own lives and the subjects they are studying. With the teacher adopting the role of facilitator, a true community develops in which rich and meaningful dialogue results in enquiry of the highest order. Each chapter is (...)
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  19.  25
    Nancy Vansieleghem & David Kennedy (eds.) (2011). Philosophy for Children in Transition: Problems and Prospects. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Philosophy for Children in Transition_ presents a diverse collection of perspectives on the worldwide educational movement of philosophy for children. Educators and philosophers establish the relationship between philosophy and the child, and clarify the significance of that relationship for teaching and learning today. The papers present a diverse range of perspectives, problems and tentative prospects concerning the theory and practice of Philosophy for Children today The collection familiarises an actual educational practice that is steadily (...)
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  20. Jennifer Bleazby (2004). Practicality and Philosophy for Children. Critical and Creative Thinking 12 (2).
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  21.  9
    Karen Mizell (2015). Philosophy for Children, Community of INquiry, and Human Rights Education. Childhood and Philosophy 11 (22):319-328.
    The Community of Inquiry is a unique discourse model that brings adults and children together in collaborative discussions of philosophical and ethical topics. This paper examines the potential for COI to deepen children’s moral and intellectual understanding through recursive discourse that encourages them to transcend cultural limitations, confront their own moral predispositions, and increase inter-cultural understanding. As children become familiar with normative values couched in ethical dialogue, they are immersed in ideals of reciprocity and empathy. Such dialogues (...)
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  22.  22
    Anthony Krupp (2009). Reason's Children: Childhood in Early Modern Philosophy. Bucknell University Press.
    Introduction -- Descartes : purging the mind of childish ways -- Locke and Leibniz : understanding children -- Locke : children's language and the fate of changelings -- Leibniz : against infant damnation -- Wolff : the inferiority of childhood -- Baumgarten : childhood and the analogue of reason.
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  23.  88
    Jennifer Bleazby (2011). Overcoming Relativism and Absolutism: Dewey's Ideals of Truth and Meaning in Philosophy for Children. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):453-466.
    Different notions of truth imply and encourage different ideals of thinking, knowledge, meaning, and learning. Thus, these concepts have fundamental importance for educational theory and practice. In this paper, I intend to draw out and clarify the notions of truth, knowledge and meaning that are implied by P4C's pedagogical ideals. There is some disagreement amongst P4C theorists and practitioners about whether the community of inquiry implies either relativism or absolutism. I will argue that both relativism and absolutism are incompatible with (...)
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  24.  32
    Sevket Benhur Oral (2013). Can Deweyan Pragmatist Aesthetics Provide a Robust Framework for the Philosophy for Children Programme? Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (4):361-377.
  25.  10
    Claire Cassidy (2013). Philosophy with Children: Learning to Live Well. Childhood and Philosophy 8 (16):243-264.
    A filosofia com crianças, em todas as suas guisas, visa engendrar o pensamento filosófico e o raciocínio nas crianças. Muito é escrito sobre o que a participação na filosofia poderia fazer para a criança academicamente e emocionalmente. O que propomos aqui é que permitindo às crianças participar de diálogos filosóficos elas aprenderão uma abordagem que poderia dar suporte a sua participação na sociedade e que poderia envolvê-las na consideração e no arejamento de suas vistas, tomando decisões em suas interações e (...)
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  26.  18
    Maughn Gregory & David Kennedy (2000). Introduction to Special Issue on Philosophy for Children. Inquiry 19 (2):4-10.
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  27. Daniela G. Camhy (ed.) (1994). Children, Thinking, and Philosophy: Proceedings of the 5th International Conference of Philosophy for Children, Graz, 1992 = Das Philosophische Denken von Kindern: Kongressband des 5. Internationalen Kongresses Für Kinderphilosophie, Graz, 1992. [REVIEW] Academia Verlag.
     
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  28. Philip Cam (ed.) (2007). Philosophy with Young Children: A Classroom Handbook. Acsa.
     
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  29. Berys Nigel Gaut (2012). Philosophy for Young Children: A Practical Guide. Routledge.
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  30.  56
    Gert Biesta (2011). Philosophy, Exposure, and Children: How to Resist the Instrumentalisation of Philosophy in Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (2):305-319.
    The use of philosophy in educational programmes and practices under such names as philosophy for children, philosophy with children, or the community of philosophical enquiry, has become well established in many countries around the world. The main attraction of the educational use of philosophy seems to lie in the claim that it can help children and young people to develop skills for thinking critically, reflectively and reasonably. By locating the acquisition of such skills (...)
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  31.  16
    Dae-Ryun Chung (2008). A Study on Developing Picture Books and Parent-Teacher Manuals for Philosophy for Korean Young Children. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 27:111-122.
    This paper is a short report about a series of picture books and manuals designed for P4C (especially Philosophy for Korean Young Children). There were not proper educational reading materials or books to help Korean young children to think by (or for) themselves and dialogue with. Dr. Sharp’s is a very helpful guidebook for young children to think by themselves, dialogue with friends, and discuss with others (peers, older or younger children, teacher and (...)
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  32.  12
    Mitsuyo Toyoda (2008). Applying Philosophy for Children to Workshop-Style Environmental Education. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 27:101-109.
    This paper examines possible applications of ideas and methods of Philosophy for Children (P4C) to workshop-style environmental education conducted in Sado, Japan. The theme of the workshop is the preservation of toki (the crested ibis) and the local community development. As a result of the success in new breeding, it was determined that the toki, which once became extinct in Japan, would be released to the natural environment in 2008. In order to achieve its successful settlement, local residents (...)
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  33.  14
    Marzena Parzych (2008). Philosophy for Children. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 27:71-79.
    Philosophy for Children: In the Historical Perspective of the Progressive Nature of Human Consciousness. This paper will examine the importance of the Critical Thinking Movement and the Philosophy for Children Programme in a larger, more inclusive, and innovative perspective. The paper will explain why the CriticalThinking Movement appeared in our time and then offer a new interpretation of the importance of the Philosophy for Children Program – with both seen in a novel historical perspective (...)
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  34.  12
    Young-Sam Chun (2008). Teaching Philosophy as a Tool for Helping Children Understand Problems Properly. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 27:23-28.
    Children are surrounded by a lot of problems here and there, and they often show any tendency to answer them promptly. In this paper, I argue that helping children understand their problems properly before answering them is one of the good ways of meta-thinking teaching in philosophy for children, and then I suggest how teachers help them do so.
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  35.  11
    Yong-Sock Chang & Ji–Young Kim (2008). Visual Culture Education Through the Philosophy for Children Program. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 37:27-34.
    The appearance of mass media and a versatile medium of videos can serve the convenience and instructive information for children; on the other hand, it could abet them in implicit image consumption. Now is the time for kids' to be in need of thinking power which enables them to make a choice, applications andcriticism of information within such visual cultures. In spite of these social changes, the realities are that our curriculum still doesn't meet a learner's demand properly. This (...)
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  36.  8
    Maughn Gregory (2008). Philosophy and Children's Religious Experience. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 45:125-135.
    Philosophy serves to determine and clarifying the meaning of experience, and to make experience more meaningful, in both of the senses that Dewey distinguished: to broaden the range and amplify the value of qualities we experience, and to multiply their relevant ties to other experiences. Children’s experience is replete with philosophical meaning, and in facilitating children’s search for meaning, we are obliged to lead them in the directions that we ourselves have found most fruitful, though we should (...)
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  37.  28
    Karen L. McGavock (2007). Agents of Reform?: Children's Literature and Philosophy. Philosophia 35 (2):129-143.
    Children’s literature was first published in the eighteenth century at a time when the philosophical ideas of Jean-Jacques Rousseau on education and childhood were being discussed. Ironically, however, the first generation of children’s literature (by Maria Edgeworth et al) was incongruous with Rousseau’s ideas since the works were didactic, constraining and demanded passive acceptance from their readers. This instigated a deficit or reductionist model to represent childhood and children’s literature as simple and uncomplicated and led to (...)’s literature being overlooked and its contribution to philosophical discussions being undermined. Although Rousseau advocates freeing the child to develop, he does not feel that reading fiction promotes child development, which is a weakness in an otherwise strong argument for educational reform. Yet, rather ironically, the second generation of children’s writers, from Lewis Carroll onwards, more truly embraced Rousseau’s broader philosophical ideas on education and childhood than their predecessors, encouraging and freeing readers to imagine, reflect and actively engage in ontological enquiry. The emphasis had changed with the child being embraced in education and society as active participant rather than passive or disengaged recipient. Works deemed to be seminal to the canon of children’s literature such as Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Peter Pan and The Chronicles of Narnia challenge readers to work through conflicts many of which can be identified retrospectively as exhibiting postmodern characteristics. By exploring moral and spiritual dilemmas in their writing, Carroll, Barrie and Lewis’s works can be regarded as contributing to discussions on theodical postmodernism. The successes of The Lord of the Rings and Narnia films suggest that there is an interest in exploring moral dilemmas, fulfilling a need (perhaps for tolerance and understanding) in society at large. Children’s literature has an almost divine power to restore, to repair and to heal, all characteristics of theodical postmodernism but differing from the more widely held conception of postmodernism which pulls apart, exacerbates and exposes. Children’s literature therefore offers a healthy and constructive approach to working through moral dilemmas. In their deconstruction of childhood, these authors have brought children’s literature closer to aspects of enquiry traditionally found in the domain of adult mainstream literature. As the boundaries between childhood and adulthood become more fluid, less certain, debate is centring around whether the canon of children’s literature itself has become redundant or meaningless since there are no longer any restrictions on which subjects can be treated in children’s literature. Despite the fact that children’s literature clearly engages with difficult issues, it continues to be left out of the critical equation, not given serious attention, disregarded as simplistic and ignored in contemporary philosophical discussions concerning morality, postmodernism and the future of childhood. With children’s literature coming closer to mainstream literature, and exhibiting prominent features of postmodernism, however, it is only a matter of time before philosophical discussions actively engage with children’s literature and recognise its contribution to the resolution and reconciliation of ontological dilemmas. When this occurs, philosophy and children’s literature will re-engage, enriching contemporary investigations of existence, ethics and knowledge and fruitfully developing thought in these areas. This paper aims to contribute to this process. (shrink)
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  38.  28
    Karin Saskia Murris (2008). Philosophy with Children, the Stingray and the Educative Value of Disequilibrium. Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (3-4):667-685.
    Philosophy with children (P4C) 1 presents significant positive challenges for educators. Its 'community of enquiry' pedagogy assumes not only an epistemological shift in the role of the educator, but also a different ontology of 'child' and balance of power between educator and learner. After a brief historical sketch and an outline of the diversity among P4C practitioners, epistemological uncertainty in teaching P4C is crystallised in a succinct overview of theoretical and practical tensions that are a direct result of (...)
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  39.  48
    Nancy Vansieleghem (2005). Philosophy for Children as the Wind of Thinking. Journal of Philosophy of Education 39 (1):19–35.
    In this paper I want to analyse the meaning of education for democracy and thinking as this is generally understood by Philosophy for Children. Although we may be inclined to applaud Philosophy for Children's emphasis on children, critical thinking, autonomy and dialogue, there is reason for scepticism too. Since we are expected as a matter of course to subscribe to the basic assumptions of Philosophy for Children, we seem to become tied, as it (...)
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  40.  67
    Nancy Vansieleghem & David Kennedy (2011). What is Philosophy for Children, What is Philosophy with Children—After Matthew Lipman? Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (2):171-182.
    Philosophy for Children arose in the 1970s in the US as an educational programme. This programme, initiated by Matthew Lipman, was devoted to exploring the relationship between the notions ‘philosophy’ and ‘childhood’, with the implicit practical goal of establishing philosophy as a full-fledged ‘content area’ in public schools. Over 40 years, the programme has spread worldwide, and the theory and practice of doing philosophy for or with children and young people appears to be of (...)
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  41.  49
    Karin Murris (2000). Can Children Do Philosophy? Journal of Philosophy of Education 34 (2):261–279.
    Some philosophers claim that young children cannot do philosophy. This paper examines some of those claims, and puts forward arguments against them. Our beliefs that children cannot do philosophy are based on philosophical assumptions about children, their thinking and about philosophy. Many of those assumptions remain unquestioned by critics of Philosophy with Children. My conclusion is that the idea that very young children can do philosophy has not only significant consequences (...)
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  42.  16
    Nancy Vansieleghem (2011). Philosophy with Children as an Exercise in Parrhesia: An Account of a Philosophical Experiment with Children in Cambodia. Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (2):321-337.
    The last few decades have seen a steady growth of interest in doing philosophy with children and young people in educational settings. Philosophy with children is increasingly offered as a solution to the problems associated with what is seen by many as a disoriented, cynical, indifferent and individualistic society. It represents for its practitioners a powerful vehicle that teaches children and young people how to think about particular problems in society through the use of interpretive (...)
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  43.  37
    Maughn Gregory (2011). Philosophy for Children and its Critics: A Mendham Dialogue. Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (2):199-219.
    As conceived by founders Matthew Lipman and Ann Margaret Sharp, Philosophy for Children is a humanistic practice with roots in the Hellenistic tradition of philosophy as a way of life given to the search for meaning, in American pragmatism with its emphasis on qualitative experience, collaborative inquiry and democratic society, and in American and Soviet social learning theory. The programme has attracted overlapping and conflicting criticism from religious and social conservatives who don't want children to question (...)
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  44.  10
    Darren Chetty (2014). The Elephant in the Room: Picturebooks, Philosophy for Children and Racism. Childhood and Philosophy 10 (19):11-31.
    Whilst continuing racism is often invoked as evidence of the urgent need for Philosophy for Children, there is little in the current literature that addresses the topic. Drawing on Critical Race Theory and the related field of Critical Whiteness Studies , I argue that racism is deeply ingrained culturally in society, and best understood in the context of ‘Whiteness’. Following a CRT-informed analysis of two picturebooks that have been recommended as starting points for philosophical enquiry into multiculturalism, racism (...)
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  45.  62
    Roberto Franzini Tibaldeo (2014). REFRAMING AND PRACTICING COMMUNITY INCLUSION: THE RELEVANCE OF PHILOSOPHY FOR CHILDREN. Childhood and Philosophy 10 (20):401-420.
    I wish to carry out a philosophical inquiry into contemporary intercultural public spheres. The thesis I will support is that the achievement of inclusive public spheres (namely, with respect to our European and Western experience, the accomplishment of democracy) largely depends on one’s willingness and capacity to foster an “appreciation of diversities” by first, enhancing policies and forms of cooperation between the citizens’ emotional and motivational resources, and then enhancing their cognitive competences. More specifically, my proposal is to understand such (...)
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  46.  19
    Joanna Haynes & Karin Murris (2011). The Provocation of an Epistemological Shift in Teacher Education Through Philosophy with Children. Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (2):285-303.
    Experience indicates that the questioning and democratic nature of the community of enquiry can be demanding and unsettling for teachers, presenting unaccustomed challenges and moral dilemmas. This paper argues that such significant episodes in the practice of Philosophical with Children (PwC) offer rich opportunities for wider critical reflection on epistemological and pedagogical questions for teacher education and continuing professional development. We illustrate the nature of this ongoing work through noticing and focusing on critical incidents drawn from our lived experience (...)
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  47.  17
    Viktor Johansson (2011). 'In Charge of the Truffula Seeds': On Children's Literature, Rationality and Children's Voices in Philosophy. Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (2):359-377.
    In this paper I investigate how philosophy can speak for children and how children can have a voice in philosophy and speak for philosophy. I argue that we should understand children as responsible rational individuals who are involved in their own philosophical inquiries and who can be involved in our own philosophical investigations—not because of their rational abilities, but because we acknowledge them as conversational partners, acknowledge their reasons as reasons, and speak for them (...)
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  48.  32
    Roberto Franzini Tibaldeo (2015). Reframing and Practicing Community Inclusion. The Relevance of Philosophy for Children. Childhood and Philosophy 10 (20):401-420.
    I wish to carry out a philosophical inquiry into the present day intercultural public spheres. The thesis I endeavour to support is that the achievement of inclusive public spheres largely depends on one’s willingness and capacity to foster the “appreciation of diversities” by first, enhancing policies and forms of cooperation between the citizens’ emotional and motivational resources, and then enhancing their cognitive competences. More specifically, my proposal is to understand such an effort from the viewpoint of post-Weberian responsibility, that is (...)
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  49.  11
    Darryl Matthew De Marzio (2015). The Theoretical and Pedagogical Significance of the Philosophical Novel and Philosophy For/With Children: Introduction to the Special Issue on the Philosophical Novel for Children. Childhood and Philosophy 11 (21):11-22.
    In this paper I provide an introduction to the special issue on the Philosophical Novel for Children by pointing to a lacuna in the theoretical field of philosophy for/with children, suggesting that the field is in need of more research on the philosophical novel given its status as the curricular centerpiece of Matthew Lipman’s vision of P4/WC. I describe the genesis of the idea for this special issue, emerging as it did first from a series of questions (...)
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  50.  38
    Michael S. Pritchard (2000). Moral Philosophy for Children and Character Education. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 14 (1):13-26.
    This paper discusses the growing prominence of character education and the role moral philosophy can play here. It examines the place of inquiry in character education, and the ways in which moral philosophy can help young people to develop the virtue of reasonableness. Reasonableness, as herein described, takes into account the views and feelings of others, the willingness to allow one’s views to be scrutinized by others, and the acceptance of some degree of uncertainty about whether one’s views (...)
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