Results for 'Childs N. Ashwal S.'

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  1.  52
    The Minimally Conscious State: Definition and Diagnostic Criteria.Joseph T. Giacino & Childs N. Ashwal S. - 2002 - Neurology 58 (3):349-353.
  2.  9
    Actions Speak Louder Than Words: The U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child and U.S. Pediatric Bioethicists.Kellie R. Lang & Cheryl D. Lew - 2015 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 58 (3):281-289.
    The explicit objective for the 2014 Symposium hosted by the University of North Florida, which serves as the basis for this collection of papers, was to explore the relationship and potential for mutual support between the disciplines of child rights and pediatric bioethics in advancing the health and well-being of children in the United States and around the world. The U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child served as the locus for this discussion. A significant question emerged in the (...)
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  3.  2
    Child’s Native Language Acquisition as a Synergetic Process.S. N. Tseytlin - 2019 - Liberal Arts in Russiaроссийский Гуманитарный Журналrossijskij Gumanitarnyj Žurnalrossijskij Gumanitarnyj Zhurnalrossiiskii Gumanitarnyi Zhurnal 8 (4):288.
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  4.  27
    International Health Inequalities and Global Justice: Toward a Middle Ground.N. Daniels, S. Benatar & G. Brock - 2011 - In S. R. Benatar & Gillian Brock (eds.), Global Health and Global Health Ethics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 97--107.
    Disturbing international inequalities in health abound. Life expectancy in Swaziland is half that in Japan. A child unfortunate enough to be born in Angola has 73 times as great a chance of dying before age 5 as a child born in Norway. A mother giving birth in southern sub-Saharan Africa has 100 times as great a chance of dying from her labor as one birthing in an industrialized country. For every mile one travels outward toward the Maryland suburbs from downtown (...)
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  5.  44
    Experiences with Community Engagement and Informed Consent in a Genetic Cohort Study of Severe Childhood Diseases in Kenya.V. M. Marsh, D. M. Kamuya, A. M. Mlamba, T. N. Williams & S. S. Molyneux - 2010 - BMC Medical Ethics 11 (1):13-13.
    BackgroundThe potential contribution of community engagement to addressing ethical challenges for international biomedical research is well described, but there is relatively little documented experience of community engagement to inform its development in practice. This paper draws on experiences around community engagement and informed consent during a genetic cohort study in Kenya to contribute to understanding the strengths and challenges of community engagement in supporting ethical research practice, focusing on issues of communication, the role of field workers in 'doing ethics' on (...)
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  6. Nurturing Child and Adolescent Spirituality: Perspectives From the World's Religious Traditions.Karen Marie Yust, Aostre N. Johnson, Sandy Eisenberg Sasso & Eugene C. Roehlkepartain - 2006
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  7.  9
    King's Psychology of Child Development.E. N. Henderson - 1904 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 1 (7):181.
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  8.  14
    Child of Our TimesFather to the ChildThe Everlasting Childhood.G. J. N. Whitfield, W. D. Wall, Everett S. Ostrovsky, R. P. Menday & John Wiles - 1960 - British Journal of Educational Studies 8 (2):184.
  9.  84
    One Child: Do We Have a Right to More? By Sarah Conly.Travis N. Rieder - 2016 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 26 (2):29-34.
    There are too many people on the planet. This isn’t a popular thing to say, but it’s becoming more and more obvious that it’s true, and that we need to do something to address it. Even in our radically unjust world, where billions of people do not have adequate access to food, water, energy, and other resources, we’re still living unsustainably—overcharging our ecological credit card and torching the climate. But discussing the link between these environmental problems and the population is (...)
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  10. Book Review: Nurturing Child and Adolescent Spirituality: Perspectives From the World's Religious TraditionsNurturing Child and Adolescent Spirituality: Perspectives From the World's Religious Traditionsedited byYustKaren Marie, JohnsonAostre N., SassoSandy EisenbergandRoehlkepartainEugene C.Rowman & Littlefield, Lanham, Md., 2006. 503 Pp. $54.95. ISBN 978-0-7425-4463-5. [REVIEW]Mary E. Hess - 2007 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 61 (3):328-330.
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  11.  8
    “To Observe Well … and Thence to Make Himself Rules”: John Locke's Principles and Practice of Child Healthcare.A. N. Williams - 2007 - Medical Humanities 33 (1):22-34.
    It is often forgotten that the philosopher John Locke (1632–1704) was a highly regarded physician with a lifelong interest in medicine and was frequently consulted on medical matters, including the health of children. This child health aspect in Locke’s history has been largely ignored, with even modern commentaries on Locke and medicine giving it only a cursory mention. However, it is clear that, in child health, Locke’s influence is far more substantial than GF Still’s and George Jackson’s opinions, which limited (...)
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  12. Implementation of a Humanoid Robot as an Innovative Approach to Child Life Interventions in a Children’s Hospital: Lofty Goal or Tangible Reality?Tanya N. Beran, Jacqueline Reynolds Pearson & Bonnie Lashewicz - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    IntroductionThis study reports the findings on how Child life specialists implemented an innovative approach to providing therapeutic support to pediatric patients.MethodsPart of a larger study that uncovered themes about CLSs’ experiences while working with MEDi®, this study reports the reflections that CLSs have about the process of implementation. Seven CLSs participated in semi-structured interviews. Content analysis was conducted on interview data and three themes were generated.ResultsThe first was in regards to the adoption process whereby CLS challenges, successes, and surprises were (...)
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  13.  10
    Regional Variations in Infant and Child Mortality in Nigeria: A Multilevel Analysis.Sunday A. Adedini, Clifford Odimegwu, Eunice N. S. Imasiku, Dorothy N. Ononokpono & Latifat Ibisomi - 2015 - Journal of Biosocial Science 47 (2):165-187.
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  14.  1
    The Interaction of Child Abuse and Rs1360780 of the FKBP5 Gene is Associated with Amygdala Resting-State Functional Connectivity in Young Adults.Christiane Wesarg, Ilya M. Veer, Nicole Y. L. Oei, Laura S. Daedelow, Tristram A. Lett, Tobias Banaschewski, Gareth J. Barker, Arun L. W. Bokde, Erin Burke Quinlan, Sylvane Desrivières, Herta Flor, Antoine Grigis, Hugh Garavan, Rüdiger Brühl, Jean-Luc Martinot, Eric Artiges, Frauke Nees, Dimitri Papadopoulos Orfanos, Luise Poustka, Sarah Hohmann, Juliane H. Fröhner, Michael N. Smolka, Robert Whelan, Gunter Schumann, Andreas Heinz & Henrik Walter - 2021 - Human Brain Mapping 42 (10).
    Extensive research has demonstrated that rs1360780, a common single nucleotide polymorphism within the FKBP5 gene, interacts with early-life stress in predicting psychopathology. Previous results suggest that carriers of the TT genotype of rs1360780 who were exposed to child abuse show differences in structure and functional activation of emotion-processing brain areas belonging to the salience network. Extending these findings on intermediate phenotypes of psychopathology, we examined if the interaction between rs1360780 and child abuse predicts resting-state functional connectivity between the amygdala and (...)
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  15.  16
    The Best Interests of the Child and the Return of Results in Genetic Research: International Comparative Perspectives.Ma’N. H. Zawati, David Parry & Bartha Maria Knoppers - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):72.
    Paediatric genomic research raises particularly challenging questions on whether and under what circumstances to return research results. In the paediatric context, decision-making is guided by the best interests of the child framework, as enshrined in the 1989 international Convention on the Rights of the Child. According to this Convention, rights and responsibilities are shared between children, parents, researchers, and the state. These "relational" obligations are further complicated in the context of genetic research.
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  16.  44
    Empathy, Sympathy, Justice and the Child.Kristja´N. Kristja´Nsson * - 2004 - Journal of Moral Education 33 (3):291-305.
    This essay explains and puts into theoretical perspective the rising interest in justice as an emotional virtue. Martin Hoffman's empathy theory is germane to this debate since it gives an essentially emotion?oriented account of moral development in general, as well as an explanation of the gradual bonding of empathy/sympathy with justice. While Hoffman's theory provides valuable insights into the ways in which all moral concerns, including justice, rely on and relate to the child's original capacity for empathy, it seems to (...)
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  17.  73
    Imaging the Developing Brain: What Have We Learned About Cognitive Development?B. J. Casey, N. Tottenham, C. Liston & S. Durston - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (3):104-110.
  18.  42
    Britain's New Preimplantation Tissue Typing Policy: An Ethical Defence.N. R. Ram - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (5):278-282.
    The UK Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority was right to permit tissue typing preimplantation genetic diagnosisOn July 21 2004, the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority , Britain’s regulatory agency for reproductive technologies, revised its policy on preimplantation genetic diagnosis for tissue typing.1,2 The authority of the HFEA to enact such a policy was affirmed by the UK’s highest court, the House of Lords, on April 28 2005.3 Preimplantation genetic diagnosis combines in vitro fertilisation with genetic testing. In PGD, embryos generally (...)
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  19.  14
    Injuries to Unborn Children: Extracts From the Report of the Law Commission.S. Cooke, C. Bicknell, A. L. Diamond, D. Hodgson, N. S. Marsh & J. M. C. Sharp - 1975 - Journal of Medical Ethics 1 (3):111-115.
    We are printing, by kind permission of the Law Commission, two sections of the report of the Law Commission on injuries to unborn children. This report was the result of a request to the Law Commission by the Lord Chancellor at the time (Lord Hailsham of Saint Marylebone) to advise on `what the nature and extent of civil liability for antenatal injury should be'. The Law Commission followed its usual practice in such circumstances of consulting various bodies and obtaining expert (...)
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  20.  8
    Education Like Breach Between Past and Future.V. S. Voznyak & N. V. Lipin - 2020 - Anthropological Measurements of Philosophical Research 17:98-109.
    Purpose. The article aimed at comprehending the phenomenon of education in its anthropological content, by comparing two versions for the analytics of the crisis state in education, given by Hannah Arendt and Evald Ilyenkov. Theoretical basis. For implementing this task, the method of in-depth reflexive reading of texts is used, when traditional academic concepts are considered in a new context determined by the analytics of real social problems. In this case, we are talking about the development of thinking not only (...)
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  21.  11
    Metastatic Unknown Primary Tumour Presenting in Pregnancy: A Rarity Posing an Ethical Dilemma.S. Patni, J. Wagstaff, N. Tofazzal, M. Bonduelle, M. Moselhi, E. Kevelighan & S. Edwards - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (8):442-443.
    This brief report raises the ethical dilemma encountered by an obstetrician involved in the care of a pregnant woman with life-threatening disease. This is a particularly difficult issue if the maternal well-being is in conflict with the survival of the unborn child.
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  22.  1
    Profiles of Parents’ Beliefs About Their Child’s Intelligence and Self-Regulation: A Latent Profile Analysis.Maren Stern & Silke Hertel - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    This study examined parents’ implicit theories of intelligence and self-regulation from a person-centered perspective using latent profile analysis. First, we explored whether different belief profiles exist. Second, we examined if the emergent belief profiles differ by demographic variables and are related to parents’ failure beliefs, goal orientation, and co-regulatory strategies. Data were collected from N = 137 parents of preschoolers who answered an online survey comprising their implicit theories about the malleability and relevance of the domains intelligence and self-regulation. We (...)
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  23.  60
    To Treat or Not to Treat a Newborn Child with Severe Brain Damage? A Cross-Sectional Study of Physicians’ and the General Population’s Perceptions of Intentions.Anders Rydvall, Niklas Juth, Mikael Sandlund, Magnus Domellöf & Niels Lynøe - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (1):81-88.
    Ethical dilemmas are common in the neonatal intensive care setting. The aim of the present study was to investigate the opinions of Swedish physicians and the general public on treatment decisions regarding a newborn with severe brain damage. We used a vignette-based questionnaire which was sent to a random sample of physicians (n = 628) and the general population (n = 585). Respondents were asked to provide answers as to whether it is acceptable to discontinue ventilator treatment, and when it (...)
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  24.  9
    Postpartum Amenorrhoea in Rural Eastern Uttar Pradesh, India.K. N. S. Yadava & S. K. Jain - 1998 - Journal of Biosocial Science 30 (2):227-243.
    This paper calculates the mean duration of the postpartum amenorrhoea (PPA) and examines its demographic, and socioeconomic correlates in rural north India, using data collected through 'retrospective' (last but one child) as well as 'current status' (last child) reporting of the duration of PPA.
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  25.  9
    Do Mothers and Fathers Perceive Their Child’s Academic Potential in a Similar Way?Riitta Rautiainen, Hannu Räty & Kati Kasanen - 2014 - Educational Studies 40 (5):533-536.
    The mothers and fathers (n = 43) of third- and sixth-grade children were asked to assess their child’s academic potential in comparison with the child’s earlier competence and with that of her/his peers. In the interpersonal domain, the mothers’ and fathers’ perceptions of their child’s academic potential were related to each other, especially in mathematics, already when the child was in the third grade. Conversely, in the intrapersonal domain, the mothers’ and fathers’ perceptions were more consistent when assessing the sixth-grade (...)
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  26. Cognitive Individualism and the Child as Scientist Program.Bill Wringe - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 42 (4):518-529.
    n this paper, I examine the charge that Gopnik and Meltzoff’s ‘Child as Scientist’ program, outlined and defended in their 1997 book Words, Thoughts and Theories is vitiated by a form of ‘cognitive individualism’ about science. Although this charge has often been leveled at Gopnik and Meltzoff’s work, it has rarely been developed in any detail. -/- I suggest that we should distinguish between two forms of cognitive individualism which I refer to as ‘ontic’ and ‘epistemic’ cognitive individualism (OCI and (...)
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  27.  23
    The Formation of the Maternal–Fetal Relationship.Michelle N. Armendariz & Dorothy S. Martinez - 2015 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 15 (3):443-451.
    Previously conducted research has determined that physiological and psychophysiological communications evident during pregnancy are vital to the bond formed prenatally. These innate biological responses are further enhanced through psychophysiological factors, such as maternal prenatal stress, which attest to the essential communication between a mother and child in maternal–fetal attachment. A consideration of these factors is necessary with the increase in assisted reproductive technology, such as in vitro fertilization, surrogacy, and elective cesarean section, as this may affect the development of the (...)
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  28.  7
    Weaning and the Nature of Early Childhood Interactions Among Bofi Foragers in Central Africa.Hillary N. Fouts, Barry S. Hewlett & Michael E. Lamb - 2001 - Human Nature 12 (1):27-46.
    Western scholarly literature suggests that (1) weaning is initiated by mothers; (2) weaning takes place within a few days once mothers decide to stop nursing; (3) mothers employ specific techniques to terminate nursing; (4) semi-solid foods (gruels and mashed foods) are essential when weaning; (5) weaning is traumatic for children (it leads to temper tantrums, aggression, etc.); (6) developmental stages in relationships with mothers and others can be demarcated by weaning; and (7) weaning is a process that involves mothers and (...)
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  29.  2
    Assessment of Knowledge and Attitudes of Physicians Serving Pediatric Patients on Children›s Rights and Informed Consent in Children.Gürkan Sert, Can Ilgın, Elif Samiye Duru, Canan Kalmaz, Gizem Karagöl, Janda Hasso, Refia Katmer & Sena Ecin - 2018 - Türkiye Biyoetik Dergisi 5 (2):48-63.
    INTRODUCTION[|]The practice of medicine has evolved from old approach, in which all decisions for the patient are taken by physician, to a new approach, which includes patients to the medical decision-making process and endorses informed consent of the patients. In addition to healthcare professionals and patients, parents or legal representatives are stakeholders in the informed consent process of children. The knowledge and attitudes of physicians and medical school students about the informed consent period in children are important for the effectiveness (...)
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  30.  21
    Empirical Examination of the Ability of Children to Consent to Clinical Research.N. Ondrusek, R. Abramovitch, P. Pencharz & G. Koren - 1998 - Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (3):158-165.
    This study examined the quality of children's assent to a clinical trial. In subjects younger than 9 years of age, understanding of most aspects of the study was found to be poor to non-existent. Understanding of procedures was poor in almost all subjects. In addition, voluntariness may have been compromised in many subjects by their belief that failure to complete the study would displease others. If the fact that a child's assent has been obtained is used to justify the exposure (...)
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  31.  8
    What Comes After Compulsory Education? A Follow‐Up Study on Parental Expectations of Their Child's Future Education.Hannu Räty - 2006 - Educational Studies 32 (1):1-16.
    This paper examines the contribution of parents? education and children?s gender on parental expectations of their children?s future education and the role of parental perceptions of their child?s competencies in the formation of their expectations. A group of university and vocationally educated parents (N = 418) were asked to estimate the probability of their child entering gymnasium (high school) or vocational education and assess the child?s competencies, first in preschool, and then at the end of the third school year. It (...)
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  32. Redundancy in Perceptual and Linguistic Experience: Comparing Feature-Based and Distributional Models of Semantic Representation.Brian Riordan & Michael N. Jones - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):303-345.
    Abstract Since their inception, distributional models of semantics have been criticized as inadequate cognitive theories of human semantic learning and representation. A principal challenge is that the representations derived by distributional models are purely symbolic and are not grounded in perception and action; this challenge has led many to favor feature-based models of semantic representation. We argue that the amount of perceptual and other semantic information that can be learned from purely distributional statistics has been underappreciated. We compare the representations (...)
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  33.  20
    Allomaternal Care Among the Hadza of Tanzania.Alyssa N. Crittenden & Frank W. Marlowe - 2008 - Human Nature 19 (3):249-262.
    Cooperative child care among humans, where individuals other than the biological mother (allomothers) provide care, may increase a mother’s fertility and the survivorship of her children. Although the potential benefits to the mother are clear, the motivations for allomothers to provide care are less clear. Here, we evaluate the kin selection allomothering hypothesis using observations on Hadza hunter-gatherers collected in ten camps over 17 months. Our results indicate that related allomothers spend the largest percentage of time holding children. The higher (...)
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  34. All the Mothers Are One: Hindu India and the Cultural Reshaping of Psychoanalysis.Stanley N. Kurtz - 1992 - Columbia University Press.
    Based on the author's ethnographic research in India, the book explores the psychology of Hinduism, and offers an innovative synthesis of psychoanylsis with modern anthropological theories of cultural difference. Stanley N. Kurtz offers a new interpretation of the multiple "mother goddesses" of Hinduism, and explores how this multiplicity is key to understanding early childhood experience in which a child is raised by many "mothers" in the Hindu joint family. Arguing that traditional psychoanalytic approaches to Indian culture have applied Western models (...)
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  35.  3
    Young People Who Meaningfully Improve Are More Likely to Mutually Agree to End Treatment.Julian Edbrooke-Childs, Luís Costa da Silva, Anja Čuš, Shaun Liverpool, Catarina Pinheiro Mota, Giada Pietrabissa, Thomas Bardsley, Celia M. D. Sales, Randi Ulberg, Jenna Jacob & Nuno Ferreira - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Objective: Symptom improvement is often examined as an indicator of a good outcome of accessing mental health services. However, there is little evidence of whether symptom improvement is associated with other indicators of a good outcome, such as a mutual agreement to end treatment. The aim of this study was to examine whether young people accessing mental health services who meaningfully improved were more likely to mutually agree to end treatment.Methods: Multilevel multinomial regression analysis controlling for age, gender, ethnicity, and (...)
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  36.  57
    Deafness, Culture, and Choice.N. Levy - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (5):284-285.
    We should react to deaf parents who choose to have a deaf child with compassion not condemnationThere has been a great deal of discussion during the past few years of the potential biotechnology offers to us to choose to have only perfect babies, and of the implications that might have, for instance for the disabled. What few people foresaw is that these same technologies could be deliberately used to ensure that children would be born with disabilities. That this is a (...)
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  37.  4
    The Association Between Parent-Child Relationship and Problematic Internet Use Among English- and Chinese-Language Studies: A Meta-Analysis.Yalin Zhu, Linyuan Deng & Kun Wan - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13:885819.
    As past studies of the association between parent-child relationship and problematic internet use show mixed results and are influenced by many factors, this meta-analysis of 75 primary Chinese and English language studies from 1990 to 2021 with 110,601 participants (aged 6−25 years) explored (a) the overall association between parent-child relationship and problematic internet use, and (b) whether the association is affected by their types, country, measures, objects of the parent-child relationship, gender, age, year and publication types. We used funnel plots, (...)
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  38.  54
    Forgiveness.H. J. N. Horsbrugh - 1974 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 4 (2):269 - 282.
    There appear to be a number of general things which can be said about forgiveness. If these are left sufficiently vague they seem to be applicable to all the situations in which the term is used.First, there can be no question of forgiveness unless an injury has been inflicted on somebody by a moral agent. There must be something to forgive; and the injury that is to be forgiven must be one for which a moral agent can be held responsible. (...)
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  39.  11
    That’s One Heck of an “Unruly Horse” Riding Roughshod Overr Autonomy in Wrongful Conception.Nicky Priaulx - 2004 - Feminist Legal Studies 12 (3):317-331.
    The case of Rees v. Darlington Memorial Hospital N.H.S. Trustarises from a lower court backlash against the a prior decision of the British House of Lords in McFarlane v. Tayside Health Board. McFarlane holding that healthy children brought about by negligence in family planning procedures are blessings, and parents should therefore be denied the costs of child maintenance. But, would the House agree with the Court of Appeal in Reesthat the factual variation in that case of a disabled parent with (...)
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  40. A Developmental Perspective on Pediatric Decision-Making Capacity.N. Hardy & N. Nortjé - 2021 - In Nico Nortjé & Johan C. Bester (eds.), Pediatric Ethics: Theory and Practice. Springer Verlag. pp. 23-37.
    Decision-making capacityDecision-making capacity for pediatric patients can be difficult to determine and is influenced by a myriad of developmental considerations. This chapter begins with a discussion concerning the nature of decision-makingDecision-making and what constitutes competency. The “rule of sevensRule of sevens” frameworkFramework is then used to explicate pertinent developmental milestonesMilestones for children, dividing pediatric developmentDevelopment into 0–7, 7–14, and 14+ years of age. In particular, the authors highlight the most important cognitiveCognitive, socialSocial, andSocial emotionalemotionalEmotional considerations in each of these periods (...)
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  41.  34
    Quantity and Diversity: Simulating Early Word Learning Environments.Jessica L. Montag, Michael N. Jones & Linda B. Smith - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (S2):375-412.
    The words in children's language learning environments are strongly predictive of cognitive development and school achievement. But how do we measure language environments and do so at the scale of the many words that children hear day in, day out? The quantity and quality of words in a child's input are typically measured in terms of total amount of talk and the lexical diversity in that talk. There are disagreements in the literature whether amount or diversity is the more critical (...)
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  42.  5
    Cloning—Usurping the Creator?N. Rakover - 2001 - Global Bioethics 14 (2-3):59-67.
    Creating a man by means of cloning will certainly raise many legal and halakhic questions. But is this sufficient reason to restrain human creativity? Artificial insemination as well as surrogate motherhood also brought many questions, among them questions concerning who is considered the child's father and who is considered the child's mother. But grave questions such as these arise in every field of human endeavor. The emergence of new questions is however not in itself reason to prohibit the creative endeavors (...)
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  43.  13
    Inducing HIV Remission in Neonates: Child Rights and Research Ethics.Katherine Wade & Armand H. Matheny Antommaria - 2015 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 58 (3):348-354.
    International child rights law has the potential to change the way children are viewed and engaged by all social actors. It provides a child-centered perspective on all areas of children’s lives, including research with neonates. It differs from some bioethical perspectives by clearly articulating affirmative obligations owed to children and requiring rigorous monitoring mechanisms. The CRC’s focus on affirmative obligations and establishment of monitoring mechanisms provide additional useful elements that are not present in the dominant form of American pediatric bioethics.An (...)
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  44.  22
    Prosocial Citizens Without a Moral Compass? Examining the Relationship Between Machiavellianism and Unethical Pro-Organizational Behavior.Christopher M. Castille, John E. Buckner & Christian N. Thoroughgood - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 149 (4):919-930.
    Research in the organizational sciences has tended to portray prosocial behavior as an unqualified positive outcome that should be encouraged in organizations. However, only recently, have researchers begun to acknowledge prosocial behaviors that help maintain an organization’s positive image in ways that violate ethical norms. Recent scandals, including Volkswagen’s emissions scandal and Penn State’s child sex abuse scandal, point to the need for research on the individual factors and situational conditions that shape the emergence of these unethical pro-organizational behaviors. Drawing (...)
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  45.  36
    Public Attitudes Towards Moral Enhancement. Evidence That Means Matter Morally.Jona Specker, Maartje H. N. Schermer & Peter B. Reiner - 2017 - Neuroethics 10 (3):405-417.
    To gain insight into the reasons that the public may have for endorsing or eschewing pharmacological moral enhancement for themselves or for others, we used empirical tools to explore public attitudes towards these issues. Participants from the United States were recruited via Amazon’s Mechanical Turk and were randomly assigned to read one of several contrastive vignettes in which a 13-year-old child is described as bullying another student in school and then is offered an empathy-enhancing program. The empathy-enhancing program is described (...)
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  46.  38
    Children’s Developing Metaethical Judgments.Marco F. H. Schmidt, Ivan Gonzalez-Cabrera & Michael Tomasello - 2017 - Journal of Experimental Child Psychology 164:163-177.
    Human adults incline toward moral objectivism but may approach things more relativistically if different cultures are involved. In this study, 4-, 6-, and 9-year-old children (N = 136) witnessed two parties who disagreed about moral matters: a normative judge (e.g., judging that it is wrong to do X) and an antinormative judge (e.g., judging that it is okay to do X). We assessed children’s metaethical judgment, that is, whether they judged that only one party (objectivism) or both parties (relativism) could (...)
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  47.  11
    Poor Prenatal Diagnosis.Richard N. Stryker - 2014 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 14 (1):31-37.
    Through personal testimony, the author details the experience of fathering a baby with a poor prenatal diagnosis. The author invites the reader to follow his journey, from learning his wife is pregnant, through their experiences as a family with their unborn daughter’s poor prenatal diagnosis, welcoming their baby girl at her birth, and ultimately finding peace in her early passing. Perinatal peer support is discussed and encouraged, drawing attention to the needs and concerns of the babies, women, and families who (...)
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  48.  17
    Approaches to Parental Demand for Non-Established Medical Treatment: Reflections on the Charlie Gard Case.John J. Paris, Brian M. Cummings, Michael P. Moreland & Jason N. Batten - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (7):443-447.
    The opinion of Mr. Justice Francis of the English High Court which denied the parents of Charlie Gard, who had been born with an extremely rare mutation of a genetic disease, the right to take their child to the United States for a proposed experimental treatment occasioned world wide attention including that of the Pope, President Trump, and the US Congress. The case raise anew a debate as old as the foundation of Western medicine on who should decide and on (...)
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  49. Associations Between Children’s Numeracy Competencies, Mothers’ and Fathers’ Mathematical Beliefs, and Numeracy Activities at Home.Anna Mues, Astrid Wirth, Efsun Birtwistle & Frank Niklas - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    Children’s numeracy competencies are not only relevant for their academic achievement, but also later in life. The development of early numeracy competencies is influenced by children’s learning environment. Here, the home numeracy environment and parent’s own beliefs about mathematics play an important role for children’s numeracy competencies. However, only a few studies explicitly tested these associations separately for mothers and fathers. In our study, we assessed mothers’ and fathers’ mathematical gender stereotypes, self-efficacy and their beliefs on the importance of mathematical (...)
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  50. Anencephalic Infants as Organ Donors and the Brain Death Standard.J. W. Walters & S. Ashwal - 1989 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 14 (1):79-87.
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