Results for 'China-brain Problem'

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  1. Toward a Well-Innervated Philosophy of Mind (Chapter 4 of The Peripheral Mind).István Aranyosi - forthcoming - Oxford University Press.
    The “brain in a vat” thought experiment is presented and refuted by appeal to the intuitiveness of what the author informally calls “the eye for an eye principle”, namely: Conscious mental states typically involved in sensory processes can conceivably successfully be brought about by direct stimulation of the brain, and in all such cases the utilized stimulus field will be in the relevant sense equivalent to the actual PNS or part of it thereof. In the second section, four (...)
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  2.  14
    The Philosophical Challenge from China[REVIEW]Barry Allen - 2016 - Common Knowledge 22 (1):133-133.
    The premise of this volume, which collects the work of thirteen contributors, is that Chinese philosophy has plenty to say to the problems that occupy current philosophers. Turns out that means plenty to say in their terms and by their standards. For many—not all—of the contributors, the only “challenge” Chinese thought poses is assimilation, how same can they make it. Part of the problem is that the philosophy asked to receive this challenge is our insipid, directionless, imaginatively exhausted, institutionally (...)
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  3.  8
    Building Norms for Organ Donation in China: Pitfalls and Challenges.Ana S. Iltis - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (5):640-662.
    In most, if not all, jurisdictions with active organ transplantation programs, there is a persistent desire to increase donation rates because the demand for transplantable organs exceeds the supply. China, in particular, faces an extraordinary gap between the number of organs donated by deceased donors and the number of people seeking one or more transplants. China might look to Western countries with higher donation rates to determine how best to introduce Western practices into the Chinese system. In attempting (...)
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  4. Neurology and the mind-brain problem.Roger W. Sperry - 1952 - American Scientist 40 (2).
  5. The mind-brain problem.Peter Slezak - 2000 - In Evian Gordon (ed.), Integrative Neuroscience. Harwood Academic Publishers.
    The problem of explaining the mind persists essentially unchanged today since the time of Plato and Aristotle. For the ancients, of course, it was not a question of the relation of mind to brain, though the question was fundamentally the same nonetheless. For Plato, the mind was conceived as distinct from the body and was posited in order to explain knowledge which transcends that available to the senses. For his successor, Aristotle, the mind was conceived as intimately related (...)
     
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  6. The mind-brain problem.J. R. Smythies - 1989 - In J. R. Smythies & John Beloff (eds.), The Case for Dualism. University of Virginia Press.
  7. The quantum mind/classical brain problem.Alfredo Pereira - 2003 - Neuroquantology.
  8. The mind-brain problem, the laws of nature, and constitutive relationships.William R. Stoeger - 1999 - In Neuroscience and the Person: Scientific Perspectives on Divine Action. Notre Dame: University Notre Dame Press.
  9. The mind-brain problem.John Beloff - manuscript
     
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  10. What is the mind-brain problem.T. Nagel - 1993 - In G. R. Bock & James L. Marsh (eds.), Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Consciousness. (Ciba Foundation Symposium 174). pp. 174--1.
  11.  28
    Quantum information theoretic approach to the mind–brain problem.Danko D. Georgiev - 2020 - Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology 158:16-32.
    The brain is composed of electrically excitable neuronal networks regulated by the activity of voltage-gated ion channels. Further portraying the molecular composition of the brain, however, will not reveal anything remotely reminiscent of a feeling, a sensation or a conscious experience. In classical physics, addressing the mind-brain problem is a formidable task because no physical mechanism is able to explain how the brain generates the unobservable, inner psychological world of conscious experiences and how in turn (...)
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  12. Philosophy of the Brain: The Brain Problem.Georg Northoff (ed.) - 2004 - John Benjamins.
  13. The logico-linguistic mind-brain problem and a proposed step towards its solution.Herbert G. Bohnert - 1974 - Philosophy of Science 41 (1):1-14.
    This paper argues that if a person's beliefs are idealized as a set of sentences (theoretical, observational, and mixed) then the device of Ramsey sentences provides a treatment, of the mind-brain problem, that has at least four noteworthy characteristics. First, sentences asserting correlations between one's own brain state and one's own "private" experiences are, on such treatment, reconstrued as neither causal, coreferential, nor as meaning postulates, but as clauses in an overall hypothesis (Ramsey sentence) whose only nonlogical (...)
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  14.  93
    Drawing the boundary between subject and object: Comments on the mind-brain problem.Robert Rosen - 1993 - Theoretical Medicine 14 (2):89-100.
    Physics says that it cannot deal with the mind-brain problem, because it does not deal in subjectivities, and mind is subjective. However, biologists still claim to seek a material basis for subjective mental processes, which would thereby render them objective. Something is clearly wrong here. I claim that what is wrong is the adoption of too narrow a view of what constitutes objectivity, especially in identifying it with what a machine can do. I approach the problem in (...)
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  15. Quantum information theoretic approach to the mind–brain problem.Danko D. Georgiev - 2020 - Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology 158:16-32.
    The brain is composed of electrically excitable neuronal networks regulated by the activity of voltage-gated ion channels. Further portraying the molecular composition of the brain, however, will not reveal anything remotely reminiscent of a feeling, a sensation or a conscious experience. In classical physics, addressing the mind–brain problem is a formidable task because no physical mechanism is able to explain how the brain generates the unobservable, inner psychological world of conscious experiences and how in turn (...)
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  16. A discussion of the mind-brain problem.K. R. Popper, B. I. B. Lindahl & P. Århem - 1993 - Theoretical Medicine 14 (2):167-180.
    In this paper Popper formulates and discusses a new aspect of the theory of mind. This theory is partly based on his earlier developed interactionistic theory. It takes as its point of departure the observation that mind and physical forces have several properties in common, at least the following six: both are located, unextended, incorporeal, capable of acting on bodies, dependent upon body, capable of being influenced by bodies. Other properties such as intensity and extension in time may be added. (...)
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  17.  2
    Organizing China: The Problem of Bureaucracy, 1949-1976.Kent Morrison & Harry Harding - 1983 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 103 (4):806.
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  18.  54
    Transcending the mind/brain problem.Karl H. Pribam - 1979 - Zygon 14 (June):103-124.
  19. Hemispheric interaction and the mind-brain problem.R. W. Sperry - 1966 - In John C. Eccles (ed.), Brain and Conscious Experience. Springer. pp. 298--313.
     
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  20.  14
    What mind-brain problem?Key Dismukes - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):351-352.
  21.  14
    The mind-brain problem[REVIEW]M. H. Pirenne - 1954 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 5 (18):153-159.
  22.  15
    Psychophysics and the mind-brain problem.Michel Treisman - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):162-163.
  23.  48
    The Problem of China.Bertrand Russell - 2020 - Routledge.
    'China, by her resources and her population, is capable of being the greatest power in the world after the United States.' Bertrand Russell, The Problem of China In 1920 the philosopher Bertrand Russell spent a year in China as Professor of Philosophy at the University of Beijing, where his lectures on mathematical logic enthralled students and listeners, including Mao Tse Tung, who attended some of Russell's talks. Written at a time when China was largely regarded (...)
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  24.  8
    Review: The Mind-Brain Problem[REVIEW]M. H. Pirenne - 1954 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 5 (18):153 - 159.
  25.  1
    Secularism and Religion in China: The Problem of Transcendence.Donald E. MacInnis - 1982 - In Frederick J. Adelmann (ed.), Contemporary Chinese Philosophy. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 117--133.
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  26. A new visualization on the mind-brain problem: Naive realism transcended.S. Harrison - 1989 - In J. R. Smythies & John Beloff (eds.), The Case for Dualism. University of Virginia Press. pp. 113--165.
     
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  27.  23
    Sensory cortex and the mind-brain problem.Roland Puccetti & Robert W. Dykes - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):337-344.
  28. Mental illness and the mind-brain problem: Delusion, belief and Searle's theory of intentionality.K. W. M. Fulford - 1993 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 14 (2).
    Until recently there has been little contact between the mind-brain debate in philosophy and the debate in psychiatry about the nature of mental illness. In this paper some of the analogies and disanalogies between the two debates are explored. It is noted in particular that the emphasis in modern philosophy of mind on the importance of the concept of action has been matched by a recent shift in the debate about mental illness from analyses of disease in terms of (...)
     
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  29.  5
    Awareness I: The Natural Ecology of Subjective Experience And the Mind-Brain Problem Revisited.Mark Ketterer - 1985 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 6 (4).
  30. Japanese Political Studies in China: Progress, Problems and Prospects.Dingping Guo - 2010 - Japanese Journal of Political Science 11 (3):333-354.
    The quantity and quality of Japanese political studies in China are influenced by political developments in China and Japan, Sino-Japanese relations, and academic development of political science. After the collapse of Japan's bubble economy and the end of the LDP's long rule in the early 1990s, many Chinese scholars diverted their attention from economic issues and took more interest in Japanese political studies. Political issues such as the resurgence of nationalism, the rise of right-wing forces, the end of (...)
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  31. Operational architectonics of the human brain biopotential field: Toward solving the mind-brain problem.Andrew A. Fingelkurts & Alexander A. Fingelkurts - 2001 - Brain and Mind 2 (3):261-296.
    The understanding of the interrelationship between brain and mind remains far from clear. It is well established that the brain's capacity to integrate information from numerous sources forms the basis for cognitive abilities. However, the core unresolved question is how information about the "objective" physical entities of the external world can be integrated, and how unifiedand coherent mental states (or Gestalts) can be established in the internal entities of distributed neuronal systems. The present paper offers a unified methodological (...)
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  32.  26
    Consciousness, behavioural patterns and the direction of biological evolution: Implications for the mind-brain problem.B. I. B. Lindahl - 2001 - In Paavo Pylkkanen & Tere Vaden (eds.), Dimensions of Conscious Experience. John Benjamins. pp. 73-99.
  33. Self‐awareness and the mind‐brain problem.Gilberto Gomes - 1995 - Philosophical Psychology 8 (2):155-65.
    The prima facie heterogeneity between psychical and physical phenomena seems to be a serious objection to psychoneural identity thesis, according to many authors, from Leibniz to Popper. It is argued that this objection can be superseded by a different conception of consciousness. Consciousness, while being conscious of something, is always unconscious of itself . Consciousness of being conscious is not immediate, it involves another, second-order, conscious state. The appearance of mental states to second-order consciousness does not reveal their true nature. (...)
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  34. Brains, Buddhas, and Believing: The Problem of Intentionality in Classical Buddhist and Cognitive-Scientific Philosophy of Mind.Daniel Anderson Arnold - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Premodern Buddhists are sometimes characterized as veritable "mind scientists" whose insights anticipate modern research on the brain and mind. Aiming to complicate this story, Dan Arnold confronts a significant obstacle to popular attempts at harmonizing classical Buddhist and modern scientific thought: since most Indian Buddhists held that the mental continuum is uninterrupted by death, they would have no truck with the idea that everything about the mental can be explained in terms of brain events. Nevertheless, a predominant stream (...)
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  35.  2
    Book Review: The Spontaneous Brain: From the Mind-Body to the World-Brain Problem[REVIEW]Jing da DongZhang - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
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  36.  70
    Review of Leslie Brothers' mistaken identity: The mind-brain problem reconsidered (new York: Suny, 2001). [REVIEW]Brian L. Keeley - 2002 - Brain and Mind 3 (3):409-412.
  37.  19
    Asking the right questions: other approaches to the mind-brain problem.Kathleen R. Gibson - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):354-355.
  38. China and Eugenics-Preliminary remarks concerning the structure and impact of a problem of International Bioethics.Ole Doering - forthcoming - Bioethics in Asia.
     
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  39. Two Problems of Moral Luck for Brain‐Computer Interfaces.Daniel J. Miller - 2022 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 39 (2):266-281.
    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are devices primarily intended to allow agents to use prosthetic body parts, wheelchairs, and other mechanisms by forming intentions or performing certain mental actions. In this paper I illustrate how the use of BCIs leads to two unique and unrecognized problems of moral luck. In short, it seems that agents who depend upon BCIs for bodily movement or the use of other mechanisms (henceforth “BCI-agents”) may end up deserving of blame and legal punishment more so than (...)
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  40.  3
    Cases Abusing Brain Death Definition in Organ Procurement in China.Norbert W. Paul, Kirk C. Allison & Huige Li - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (3):379-385.
    Organ donation after brain death has been practiced in China since 2003 in the absence of brain death legislation. Similar to international standards, China’s brain death diagnostic criteria include coma, absence of brainstem reflexes, and the lack of spontaneous respiration. The Chinese criteria require that the lack of spontaneous respiration must be verified with an apnea test by disconnecting the ventilator for 8 min to provoke spontaneous respiration. However, we have found publications in Chinese medical (...)
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  41.  12
    The Problem of China : Orientalism, "Young China", and Russell's Western Audience.Charles Argon - 2015 - Russell: The Journal of Bertrand Russell Studies 35 (2).
    Bertrand Russell’s trip to China (1920–21) led him to write numerous articles about China culminating in _The Problem of China_. This paper reconsiders _The Problem of China_ using Edward Said’s discussion of Orientalism and contextualizes it with Russell’s other published and unpublished writings on China and the reactions of his Chinese contemporaries. I argue that Russell’s views reflect his prior philosophy and Western influences more than an analysis of his trip and reveal that this was (...)
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  42.  92
    Mind, Brain, Behavior: The Mind-Body Problem and the Philosophy of Psychology.Martin Carrier & Jürgen Mittelstrass - 1991 - De Gruyter.
    Translation of: Geist, Gehirn, Verhalten.
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  43.  3
    Problems and development strategies for research ethics committees in China’s higher education institutions.Jiyin Zhou - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (12):e56-e56.
    The establishment of research ethics committees in China’s higher education institutions is lagging far behind western developed countries. This has at least partly directly led to anomie in scientific research ethics, as seen in the recent controversies involving a proposed human head transplant and gene-edited babies. At present, the problems for REC in China’s HEI include lack of regulation, informal ethics reviews, lack of supervision and insufficient ethics review capacity. To counteract these problems, suggested measures include mandatory formation (...)
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  44. Brain and Consciousness. Some Prolegomena to an Approach to the Problem.Hartwig Kuhlenbeck - 1960 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 10 (40):341-344.
  45.  76
    The brain/body problem.Marya Schechtman - 1997 - Philosophical Psychology 10 (2):149 – 164.
    It is a commonplace of contemporary thought that the mind is located in the brain. Although there have been some challenges to this view, it has remained mainstream outside of a few specialized discussions, and plays a prominent role in a wide variety of philosophical arguments. It is further assumed that the source of this view is empirical. I argue it is not. Empirical discoveries show conclusively that the brain is the central organ of mental life, but do (...)
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  46. Confucian China and Its Modern Fate. Volume III: The Problem of Historical Significance.Joseph R. Levenson - 1968 - Philosophy East and West 18 (3):205-213.
     
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  47. Brain activity reconstruction by finding a source parameter in an inverse problem.Amir Hosein Hadian-Rasanan & Jamal Amani Rad - 2020 - In Snehashish Chakraverty (ed.), Mathematical methods in interdisciplinary sciences. Wiley.
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  48. Ethical problems concerning the international brain drain of healthcare professionals.Dorina Maria Stanescu - 2016 - In Sabine Salloch & Verena Sandow (eds.), Ethics and Professionalism in Healthcare: Transition and Challenges. Routledge.
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  49. The Brain-Consciousness Problem.A. O. Gome - 1966 - In John C. Eccles (ed.), Brain and Conscious Experience. Springer. pp. 446.
     
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  50. The Brain-Mind Problem: Philosophical and Neurophyiological Approaches.B. Gulyas (ed.) - 1987 - Leuven University Press.
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