29 found
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  1. The Dynamics of Vagueness.Chris Barker - 2002 - Linguistics and Philosophy 25 (1):1-36.
  2.  61
    Negotiating Taste.Chris Barker - 2013 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 56 (2-3):240-257.
  3.  44
    Parasitic Scope.Chris Barker - 2007 - Linguistics and Philosophy 30 (4):407-444.
    I propose the first strictly compositional semantic account of same. New data, including especially NP-internal uses such as two men with the same name, suggests that same in its basic use is a quantificational element taking scope over nominals. Given type-lifting as a generally available mechanism, I show that this follows naturally from the fact that same is an adjective. Independently-motivated assumptions extend the analysis to standard examples such as Anna and Bill read the same book via a mechanism I (...)
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  4. Continuations and Natural Language.Chris Barker & Chung-Chieh Shan - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    This book takes concepts developed by researchers in theoretical computer science and adapts and applies them to the study of natural language meaning. Summarizing over a decade of research, Chris Barker and Chung-chieh Shan put forward the Continuation Hypothesis: that the meaning of a natural language expression can depend on its own continuation.
     
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  5.  63
    Direct Compositionality.Chris Barker & Pauline I. Jacobson (eds.) - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    This book examines the hypothesis of "direct compositionality", which requires that semantic interpretation proceed in tandem with syntactic combination. Although associated with the dominant view in formal semantics of the 1970s and 1980s, the feasibility of direct compositionality remained unsettled, and more recently the discussion as to whether or not this view can be maintained has receded. The syntax-semantics interaction is now often seen as a process in which the syntax builds representations which, at the abstract level of logical form, (...)
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  6.  48
    Clarity and the Grammar of Skepticism.Chris Barker - 2009 - Mind and Language 24 (3):253-273.
    Why ever assert clarity? If It is clear that p is true, then saying so should be at best superfluous. Barker and Taranto (2003) and Taranto (2006) suggest that asserting clarity reveals information about the beliefs of the discourse participants, specifically, that they both believe that p . However, mutual belief is not sufficient to guarantee clarity ( It is clear that God exists ). I propose instead that It is clear that p means instead (roughly) 'the publicly available evidence (...)
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  7.  22
    Continuations and the Nature of Quantification.Chris Barker - 2002 - Natural Language Semantics 10 (3):211-242.
    This paper proposes that the meanings of some natural language expressions should be thought of as functions on their own continuations. Continuations are a well-established analytic tool in the theory of programming language semantics; in brief, a continuation is the entire default future of a computation. I show how a continuation-based grammar can unify several aspects of natural language quantification in a new way: merely stating the truth conditions for quantificational expressions in terms of continuations automatically accounts for scope displacement (...)
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  8.  23
    Types as Graphs: Continuations in Type Logical Grammar. [REVIEW]Chris Barker & Chung-chieh Shan - 2006 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 15 (4):331-370.
    Using the programming-language concept of continuations, we propose a new, multimodal analysis of quantification in Type Logical Grammar. Our approach provides a geometric view of in-situ quantification in terms of graphs, and motivates the limited use of empty antecedents in derivations. Just as continuations are the tool of choice for reasoning about evaluation order and side effects in programming languages, our system provides a principled, type-logical way to model evaluation order and side effects in natural language. We illustrate with an (...)
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  9. Explaining Crossover and Superiority as Left-to-Right Evaluation.Chung-Chieh Shan & Chris Barker - 2005 - Linguistics and Philosophy 29 (1):91 - 134.
    We present a general theory of scope and binding in which both crossover and superiority violations are ruled out by one key assumption: that natural language expressions are normally evaluated (processed) from left to right. Our theory is an extension of Shan’s (2002) account of multiple-wh questions, combining continuations (Barker, 2002) and dynamic type-shifting. Like other continuation-based analyses, but unlike most other treatments of crossover or superiority, our analysis is directly compositional (in the sense of, e.g., Jacobson, 1999). In particular, (...)
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  10.  9
    How to Tell the Political Truth: Foucault on New Combinations of the Basic Modes of Veridiction.Chris Barker - forthcoming - Contemporary Political Theory:1-22.
    This article pays close attention to Michel Foucault's theory that political regimes are enlightened through courageous free speech. A Foucaultian enlightenment occurs not when philosophical reason completely replaces superstition and enthusiasm in the public sphere, but instead when the parrhesiast partially organizes competing claims to know and to speak the truth. While much of the recent scholarly literature on Foucault’s later lectures emphasizes the political importance of the parrhesiast, less attention has been paid to the overlap and/or incompatibility between parrhesia (...)
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  11.  22
    Association with Distributivity and the Problem of Multiple Antecedents for Singular Different.Dylan Bumford & Chris Barker - 2013 - Linguistics and Philosophy 36 (5):355-369.
    Brasoveanu (Linguist Philos 34:93–168, 2011) argues that “different” exhibits what he calls association with distributivity: a distributive operator such as “each” creates a two-part context that propagates through the compositional semantics in a way that can be accessed by a subordinate “different”. We show that Brasoveanu’s analysis systematically undergenerates, failing to provide interpretations of sentences such as “Every1 boy claimed every girl read a different1 poem”, in which “different” can associate with a non-local distributive operator. We provide a generalized version (...)
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  12.  27
    Presuppositions for Proportional Quantifiers.Chris Barker - 1996 - Natural Language Semantics 4 (3):237-259.
    Most studies of the so-called proportion problem seek to understand how lexical and structural properties of sentences containing adverbial quantifiers give rise to various proportional readings. This paper explores a related but distinct problem: given a use of a particular sentence in context, why do only some of the expected proportional readings seem to be available? That is, why do some sentences allow an asymmetric reading when other, structurally similar sentences seem to require a symmetric reading? Potential factors suggested in (...)
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  13.  15
    Scopability and Sluicing.Chris Barker - 2013 - Linguistics and Philosophy 36 (3):187-223.
    This paper analyzes sluicing as anaphora to an anti-constituent (a continuation), that is, to the semantic remnant of a clause from which a subconstituent has been removed. For instance, in Mary said that [John saw someone yesterday], but she didn’t say who, the antecedent clause is John saw someone yesterday, the subconstituent targeted for removal is someone, and the ellipsis site following who is anaphoric to the scope remnant John saw ___ yesterday. I provide a compositional syntax and semantics on (...)
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  14.  50
    Remark on Jacobson 1999: Crossover as a Local Constraint. [REVIEW]Chris Barker - 2004 - Linguistics and Philosophy 28 (4):447 - 472.
  15.  6
    Negative Polarity as Scope Marking.Chris Barker - 2018 - Linguistics and Philosophy 41 (5):483-510.
    What is the communicative value of negative polarity? That is, why do so many languages maintain a stock of special indefinites that occur only in a proper subset of the contexts in which ordinary indefinites can appear? Previous answers include: marking the validity of downward inferences; marking the invalidity of veridical inferences; or triggering strengthening implications. My starting point for exploring a new answer is the fact that an NPI must always take narrow scope with respect to its licensing context. (...)
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  16.  12
    Group Terms in English: Representing Groups as Atoms.Barker Chris - 1992 - Journal of Semantics 9 (1):69-93.
    What do terms such as the committee, the league, and the group of women denote? Pre-theoretically, group terms have a dual personality. On the one hand, the committee corresponds to an entity as ideosyncratic in its properties as any other object; for instance, two otherwise identical committees can vary with respect to the purpose for which they were formed. Call this aspect the group-as-individual. On the other hand, the identity of a group is at least partially determined by the properties (...)
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  17.  49
    3.1 Two Equally Valid Views of the Syntax–Semantics Interface.Chris Barker - 2007 - In Chris Barker & Pauline I. Jacobson (eds.), Direct Compositionality. Oxford University Press. pp. 14--102.
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  18.  57
    A Theory of Command Relations.Chris Barker & Geoffrey K. Pullum - 1990 - Linguistics and Philosophy 13 (1):1 - 34.
  19. William Rounds Scott Soames.Martin Stokhof, Dorit Abusch, Ju D. Apresjan, Nicholas Asher, David Auerbach, Kent Bach, Mark Baltin, Chris Barker, Stephen Barker & Ellen Barton - 1995 - Linguistics and Philosophy 18:687-688.
     
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  20.  37
    New Directions for Proof Theory in Linguistics. ESSLLI 2007 Course Reader.Anna Szabolcsi & Chris Barker - manuscript
  21.  15
    Reviewers of Submitted Papers During 1993.Jody Azzouni, Emmon Bach, Chris Barker, Wojciech Buzkowski, Robyn Carsten, Gennaro Chierchia, Max Cresswell, Mary Dalrymple & Martin Davies - 1993 - Linguistics and Philosophy 16:655-556.
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  22.  10
    Marr Prize Committee.Chris Barker, Marlene Behrmann, Charles Elkan, Jeff Elman & Keith Holyoak - 1996 - In Garrison W. Cottrell (ed.), Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Lawrence Erlbaum.
  23. Nominal Thematic Proto-Roles.Chris Barker & David Dowty - unknown
    Let us suppose that thematic roles, or something very much like them, are needed to describe lexical and semantic patterns in the behavior of verbal predicates. But what about nouns? Is there evidence independent of verbal constructions motivating a system of nominal thematic relations? We suggest that the general problem of argument selection does in fact motivate a set of quintessentially nominal thematic proto-roles which we call Proto- Part and Proto-Whole. These nominal proto-roles are parallel to but distinct from the (...)
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  24.  1
    Joseph Persky, The Political Economy of Progress: John Stuart Mill and Modern Radicalism. Reviewed By.Chris Barker - 2017 - Philosophy in Review 37 (5/6):212-214.
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  25.  3
    David Brink , Mill's Progressive Principles . Reviewed By.Chris Barker - 2014 - Philosophy in Review 34 (6):290-292.
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  26.  2
    Mass and Elite Politics in Mill's Considerations on Representative Government.Chris Barker - 2015 - History of European Ideas 41 (8):1143-1163.
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  27. 12.1 Direct Compositionality Beyond the Sentence Level.Kent Bach, Chris Barker, Kai von Fintel, Lyn Frazier, James Isaacs, Angelika Kratzer, Bill Ladusaw, Helen Majewski, Line Mikkelsen & Barbara Partee - 2007 - In Chris Barker & Pauline I. Jacobson (eds.), Direct Compositionality. Oxford University Press. pp. 405.
     
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  28. Freedom in Shakespeare's English History Plays.Chris Barker - 2013 - Interpretation 40 (2):221-252.
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  29. Proceedings of Sinn Und Bedeutung 2, Ohio State University.Chris Barker & David Dowty (eds.) - 1992
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