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  1.  8
    Self-Deselection:Technopsychotic Annihilation Via Cyborg.Chris Crittenden - 2002 - Ethics and the Environment 7 (2):127-152.
    The cry that advanced machines will come to dominate human beings resounds from the time of the Luddites up to the current consternation by the chief scientist of Sun Microsystems, Bill Joy. My theme is a twist on this fear: self-deselection, the possibility that humans will voluntarily combine their own bodies with technological additions to the point where it could reasonably be said that our species has been replaced by another kind of entity, a hybrid of human and radical enhancement, (...)
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  2.  70
    Ecofeminism Meets Business: A Comparison of Ecofeminist, Corporate, and Free Market Ideologies. [REVIEW]Chris Crittenden - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 24 (1):51 - 63.
    This paper develops a psychological and ethical ecofeminist position and then compares ecofeminism to corporate and free market capitalism in terms of effects along four scales of well-being: democracy/human rights, environmental health, psychological health, and cruelty toward animals. Using aspects of symbolic interactionism and Antony Weston's self-validating reduction model, it is demonstrated that an ecofeminist belief system tends to promote moral and psychological health whereas the discussed forms of capitalistic thinking militate in the other direction. Ecofeminism is not, however, incompatible (...)
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  3.  33
    Subordinate and Oppressive Conceptual Frameworks: A Defense of Ecofeminist Perspectives.Chris Crittenden - 1998 - Environmental Ethics 20 (3):247-263.
    In this essay, I first demonstrate that Beth Dixon’s central arguments challenging Karen Warren’s “logic of domination” do not succeed. Second, I argue that the logic of domination not only connects the oppression of women and animals—a possibility that Dixon disputes—but it in fact plays a significant role in connecting these oppressions, and many others besides, in its capacity as a component of a larger oppressive conceptual framework. My negative arguments against Dixon provide a foundation for the positive arguments in (...)
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  4.  23
    Self-Deselection: Technopsychotic Annihilation Via Cyborg.Chris Crittenden - 2002 - Ethics and the Environment 7 (2):127-152.
    The cry that advanced machines will come to dominate human beings resounds from the time of the Luddites up to the current consternation by the chief scientist of Sun Microsystems, Bill Joy. My theme is a twist on this fear: self-deselection, the possibility that humans will voluntarily combine their own bodies with technological additions to the point where it could reasonably be said that our species has been replaced by another kind of entity, a hybrid of human and radical enhancement, (...)
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  5.  7
    Pluhar's Perfectionism: A Critique of Her (Un) Egalitarian Ethic.Chris Crittenden - 2003 - Between the Species 13 (3):3.
    I intend to criticize Evelyn Pluhar’s allegedly egalitarian ethic, presented in her recent work Beyond Prejudice, partly by way of contrasting it with what she calls “perfectionism” and partly by demonstrating that, in fact, her ethic schizophrenically embraces a defective form of perfectionism. My analysis suggests that knotty animal-rights dilemmas are best approached not from a stance of viewing animals and humans as morally equal but rather from a framework more flexible and adaptive to the complexity of real-life scenarios. Such (...)
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