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Christopher D. Frith [28]Chris Frith [27]Chris D. Frith [18]Christopher Frith [5]
  1. Abnormalities in the Awareness of Action.Sarah-Jayne Blakemore, Daniel M. Wolpert & Christopher D. Frith - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (6):237-242.
  2.  88
    Social Cognition in the We-Mode.Mattia Gallotti & Chris Frith - 2013 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (4):160-165.
  3.  61
    Explaining Delusions of Control: The Comparator Model 20years On.Chris Frith - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):52-54.
    Over the last 20 years the comparator model for delusions of control has received considerable support in terms of empirical studies. However, the original version clearly needs to be replaced by a model with a much greater degree of sophistication and specificity. Future developments are likely to involve the specification of the role of dopamine in the model and a generalisation of its explanatory power to the whole range of positive symptoms. However, we will still need to explain why symptoms (...)
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  4.  49
    The Self in Action: Lessons From Delusions of Control.Chris Frith - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (4):752-770.
    Patients with delusions of control are abnormally aware of the sensory consequences of their actions and have difficulty with on-line corrections of movement. As a result they do not feel in control of their movements. At the same time they are strongly aware of the action being intentional. This leads them to believe that their actions are being controlled by an external agent. In contrast, the normal mark of the self in action is that we have very little experience of (...)
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  5. Explaining the Symptoms of Schizophrenia: Abnormalities in the Awareness of Action.Christopher D. Frith, S. J. Blakemore & D. Wolpert - 2000 - Brain Research Reviews 31 (2):357-363.
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  6. Self-Awareness and Action.Sarah-Jayne Blakemore & Chris Frith - 2003 - Current Opinion in Neurobiology. Special Issue 13 (2):219-224.
  7.  33
    Supra-Personal Cognitive Control and Metacognition.Nicholas Shea, Annika Boldt, Dan Bang, Nick Yeung, Cecilia Heyes & Chris D. Frith - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (4):186–193.
    The human mind is extraordinary in its ability not merely to respond to events as they unfold but also to adapt its own operation in pursuit of its agenda. This ‘cognitive control’ can be achieved through simple interactions among sensorimotor processes, and through interactions in which one sensorimotor process represents a property of another in an implicit, unconscious way. So why does the human mind also represent properties of cognitive processes in an explicit way, enabling us to think and say (...)
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  8. Attention to Action and Awareness of Other Minds.Christopher D. Frith - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):481-487.
    We have only limited awareness of the system by which we control our actions and this limited awareness does not seem to be concerned with the control of action. Awareness of choosing one action rather than another comes after the choice has been made, while awareness of initiating an action occurs before the movement has begun. These temporal differences bind together in consciousness the intention to act and the consequences of the action. This creates our sense of agency. Activity in (...)
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  9. Synesthesia and Consciousness.Noam Sagiv & Chris D. Frith - 2013 - In Julia Simner & Edward Hubbard (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Synesthesia. Oxford University Press. pp. 924--940.
    In this chapter we examine the role of synaesthesia research within the broader context of the science of the mind and in particular the scientific study of consciousness. We argue that synaesthesia could be used as a model problem for the scientific study of consciousness, offering a novel perspective on perception, awareness and even social cognition. We highlight some of the lessons we have learnt from studying synaesthesia and areas in which we see synaesthesia research generating further insights into understanding (...)
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  10.  20
    Coming to Terms: Quantifying the Benefits of Linguistic Coordination.Riccardo Fusaroli, Bahador Bahrami, Karsten Olsen, Andreas Roepstorff, Geraint Rees, Chris Frith & Kristian Tylén - 2012 - Psychological Science 23 (8):931-939.
    Sharing a public language facilitates particularly efficient forms of joint perception and action by giving interlocutors refined tools for directing attention and aligning conceptual models and action. We hypothesized that interlocutors who flexibly align their linguistic practices and converge on a shared language will improve their cooperative performance on joint tasks. To test this prediction, we employed a novel experimental design, in which pairs of participants cooperated linguistically to solve a perceptual task. We found that dyad members generally showed a (...)
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  11. Inattentional Blindness Versus Inattentional Amnesia for Fixated but Ignored Words.Geraint Rees, C. Russell, Christopher D. Frith & Julia Driver - 1999 - Science 286 (5449):2504-7.
  12.  66
    Neural Correlates of Change Detection and Change Blindness.Diane Beck, Geraint Rees, Christopher D. Frith & Nilli Lavie - 2001 - Nature Neuroscience 4 (6):645-650.
  13.  23
    Detecting Deception: The Scope and Limits.Kamila E. Sip, Andreas Roepstorff, William McGregor & Chris D. Frith - 2008 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):48-53.
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  14.  58
    The Neural Correlates of Conscious Experience: An Experimental Framework.Chris Frith, Richard Perry & Erik Lumer - 1999 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (3):105-114.
  15.  59
    Language as a Tool for Interacting Minds.Kristian Tylén, Ethan Weed, Mikkel Wallentin, Andreas Roepstorff & Chris D. Frith - 2010 - Mind and Language 25 (1):3-29.
    What is the role of language in social interaction? What does language bring to social encounters? We argue that language can be conceived of as a tool for interacting minds, enabling especially effective and flexible forms of social coordination, perspective-taking and joint action. In a review of evidence from a broad range of disciplines, we pursue elaborations of the language-as-a-tool metaphor, exploring four ways in which language is employed in facilitation of social interaction. We argue that language dramatically extends the (...)
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  16. Skull-Bound Perception and Precision Optimization Through Culture.Bryan Paton, Joshua Skewes, Chris Frith & Jakob Hohwy - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (3):222-222.
    Clark acknowledges but resists the indirect mind–world relation inherent in prediction error minimization (PEM). But directness should also be resisted. This creates a puzzle, which calls for reconceptualization of the relation. We suggest that a causal conception captures both aspects. With this conception, aspects of situated cognition, social interaction and culture can be understood as emerging through precision optimization.
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  17.  7
    What's at the Top in the Top-Down Control of Action? Script-Sharing and 'Top-Top' Control of Action in Cognitive Experiments.Andreas Roepstorff & Chris Frith - 2004 - Psychological Research 68 (2-3):189--198.
    The distinction between bottom-up and top-down control of action has been central in cognitive psychology, and, subsequently, in functional neuroimaging. While the model has proven successful in describing central mechanisms in cognitive experiments, it has serious shortcomings in explaining how top-down control is established. In particular, questions as to what is at the top in top-down control lead us to a controlling homunculus located in a mythical brain region with outputs and no inputs. Based on a discussion of recent brain (...)
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  18.  35
    Unconscious Activation of Visual Cortex in the Damaged Right Hemisphere of a Parietal Patient with Extinction.Geraint Rees, E. Wojciulik, Karen Clarke, Masud Husain, Christopher D. Frith & Julia Driver - 2000 - Brain 123 (8):1624-1633.
  19. The Social Brain?Chris D. Frith - 2007 - In Nathan Emery, Nicola Clayton & Chris Frith (eds.), Social Intelligence: From Brain to Culture. Oxford University Press.
     
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  20.  4
    Does Interaction Matter? Testing Whether a Confidence Heuristic Can Replace Interaction in Collective Decision-Making.Dan Bang, Riccardo Fusaroli, Kristian Tylén, Karsten Olsen, Peter E. Latham, Jennifer Y. F. Lau, Andreas Roepstorff, Geraint Rees, Chris D. Frith & Bahador Bahrami - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 26:13-23.
    In a range of contexts, individuals arrive at collective decisions by sharing confidence in their judgements. This tendency to evaluate the reliability of information by the confidence with which it is expressed has been termed the ‘confidence heuristic’. We tested two ways of implementing the confidence heuristic in the context of a collective perceptual decision-making task: either directly, by opting for the judgement made with higher confidence, or indirectly, by opting for the faster judgement, exploiting an inverse correlation between confidence (...)
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  21.  29
    Herding in Humans.Ramsey M. Raafat, Nick Chater & Chris Frith - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (10):420-428.
  22.  28
    Reputation Management in the Age of the World-Wide Web.Claudio Tennie, Uta Frith & Chris D. Frith - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (11):482-488.
  23. Can Neuroscience Explain Consciousness?Jakob Hohwy & Christopher D. Frith - 2004 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (7-8):180-198.
    Cognitive neuroscience aspires to explain how the brain produces conscious states. Many people think this aspiration is threatened by the subjective nature of introspective reports, as well as by certain philosophical arguments. We propose that good neuroscientific explanations of conscious states can consolidate an interpretation of introspective reports, in spite of their subjective nature. This is because the relative quality of explanations can be evaluated on independent, methodological grounds. To illustrate, we review studies that suggest that aspects of the feeling (...)
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  24.  10
    A Duet for One.Karl Friston & Christopher Frith - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 36:390-405.
  25.  1
    Dissociation of Mechanisms Underlying Syllogistic Reasoning.Vinod Goel, Christian Buchel, Chris Frith & Raymond J. Dolan - 2000 - NeuroImage 12 (5):504-514.
    A key question for cognitive theories of reasoning is whether logical reasoning is inherently a sentential linguistic process or a process requiring spatial manipulation and search. We addressed this question in an event-related fMRI study of syllogistic reasoning, using sentences with and without semantic content. Our findings indicate involvement of two dissociable networks in deductive reasoning. During content-based reasoning a left hemisphere temporal system was recruited. By contrast, a formally identical reasoning task, which lacked semantic content, activated a parietal system. (...)
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  26.  23
    Dual-Process Theories and Consciousness: The Case for "Type Zero" Cognition.Nicholas Shea & Chris D. Frith - 2016 - Neuroscience of Consciousness 2016:1-10.
    A step towards a theory of consciousness would be to characterise the effect of consciousness on information processing. One set of results suggests that the effect of consciousness is to interfere with computations that are optimally performed non-consciously. Another set of results suggests that conscious, system 2 processing is the home of norm-compliant computation. This is contrasted with system 1 processing, thought to be typically unconscious, which operates with useful but error-prone heuristics. -/- These results can be reconciled by separating (...)
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  27.  34
    Anticipation is the Key to Understanding Music and the Effects of Music on Emotion.Peter Vuust & Chris D. Frith - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):599-600.
    There is certainly a need for a framework to guide the study of the physiological mechanisms underlying the experience of music and the emotions that music evokes. However, this framework should be organised hierarchically, with musical anticipation as its fundamental mechanism.
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  28.  46
    Neural Correlates of Conscious and Unconscious Vision in Parietal Extinction.Geraint Rees, E. Wojciulik, Karen Clarke, Masud Husain & Christopher D. Frith - 2002 - Neurocase 8 (5):387-393.
  29.  18
    How Can We Share Experiences?Chris Frith - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (9):374.
  30.  33
    Response to Di Paolo Et Al.: How, Exactly, Does It ‘Just Happen’? Interaction by Magic.Mattia Gallotti & Chris Frith - 2013 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (7):304-305.
  31.  17
    Social Intelligence: From Brain to Culture.Nathan Emery, Nicola Clayton & Chris Frith (eds.) - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Why are humans so clever? This book explores the idea that this cleverness has evolved through the increasing complexity of social groups. It brings together contributions from leaders in the field, examining social intelligence in different animal species and exploring its development, evolution and the brain systems upon which it depends.
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  32.  14
    Consciousness is for Other People.Chris Frith - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):682.
  33.  30
    The Role of the Prefrontal Cortex in Self-Consciousness: The Case of Auditory Hallucinations.Christopher D. Frith - 1996 - Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B 351:1505-12.
  34.  18
    On Hyperpriors and Hypopriors: Comment on Pellicano and Burr.Karl J. Friston, Rebecca Lawson & Chris D. Frith - 2013 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (1):1.
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  35. The Problem of Introspection.Christopher D. Frith & Hakwan C. Lau - 2006 - Consciousness and Cognition 15 (4):761-764.
  36.  30
    Disorders of Self-Monitoring and the Symptoms of Schizophrenia.Sarah-Jayne Blakemore & Chris Frith - 2003 - In Tilo Kircher & Anthony S. David (eds.), The Self in Neuroscience and Psychiatry. Cambridge University Press. pp. 407--424.
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  37.  47
    A Specific Role for the Thalamus in Mediating the Interaction of Attention and Arousal in Humans.C. Portas, Geraint Rees, A. Howseman, O. Josephs, R. Turner & Christopher D. Frith - 1998 - Journal of Neuroscience 18 (21):8979-8989.
  38.  17
    Attention to Action and Awareness of Other Minds.Chris Frith - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):481-487.
    We have only limited awareness of the system by which we control our actions and this limited awareness does not seem to be concerned with the control of action. Awareness of choosing one action rather than another comes after the choice has been made, while awareness of initiating an action occurs before the movement has begun. These temporal differences bind together in consciousness the intention to act and the consequences of the action. This creates our sense of agency. Activity in (...)
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  39.  4
    Methodologies for Identifying the Neural Correlates of Consciousness.Geraint Rees & Chris Frith - 2007 - In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell. pp. 551--566.
  40.  3
    In What Context is Latent Inhibition Relevant to the Symptoms of Schizophrenia?Chris Frith - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (1):28-29.
  41. A Brief History of the Scientific Approach to the Study of Consciousness.Christopher D. Frith & Geraint Rees - 2007 - In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell.
     
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  42.  89
    Consciousness, Information Processing and Schizophrenia.Christopher D. Frith - 1979 - British Journal of Psychiatry 134:225-35.
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  43.  11
    Towards a Functional Anatomy of Volition.Sean A. Spence & Chris D. Frith - 1999 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (8-9):8-9.
    In this paper we examine the functional anatomy of volition, as revealed by modern brain imaging techniques, in conjunction with neuropsychological data derived from human and non-human primates using other methodologies. A number of brain regions contribute to the performance of consciously chosen, or ‘willed', actions. Of particular importance is dorsolateral prefrontal cortex , together with those brain regions with which it is connected, via cortico-subcortical and cortico-cortical circuits. That aspect of free will which is concerned with the voluntary selection (...)
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  44.  15
    Language is Shaped for Social Interactions, as Well as by the Brain.Mikkel Wallentin & Chris D. Frith - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):536-537.
    Language learning is not primarily driven by a motivation to describe invariant features of the world, but rather by a strong force to be a part of the social group, which by definition is not invariant. It is not sufficient for language to be fit for the speaker's perceptual motor system. It must also be fit for social interactions.
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  45.  37
    Conscious Will in the Absence of Ghosts, Hypnotists, and Other People.Johannes Schultz, Natalie Sebanz & Chris Frith - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):674-675.
    We suggest that certain experiences reported by patients with schizophrenia show that priority, consistency, and exclusivity are not sufficient for the experience of willing an action. Furthermore, we argue that even if priority, consistency, and exclusivity cause the experience of being the author of an action, this does not mean that conscious will is an illusion.
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  46.  88
    Making a Case for Introspection.Alexandra Zinck, Sanne Lodahl & Chris D. Frith - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):163-164.
    Defending first-person introspective access to own mental states, we argue against Carruthers' claim of mindreading being prior to meta-cognition and for a fundamental difference between how we understand our own and others' mental states. We conclude that a model based on one mechanism but involving two different kinds of access for self and other is sufficient and more consistent with the evidence.
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  47. The Neural Correlates of 'Deaf-Hearing' in Man. Conscious Sensory Awareness Enabled by Attentional Modulation.Almut Engelien, W. Huber, D. Silbersweig, E. Stern, Christopher D. Frith, W. Doring, A. Thron & R. S. J. Frachowiak - 2000 - Brain 123 (3):532-545.
     
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  48.  78
    Models of the Pathological Mind.Christopher D. Frith & Shaun Gallagher - 2002 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (4):57-80.
    Christopher Frith is a research professor at the Functional Imaging Laboratory of the Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience at University College, London. He explores, experimentally, using the techniques of functional brain imaging, the relationship between human consciousness and the brain. His research focuses on questions pertaining to perception, attention, control of action, free will, and awareness of our own mental states and those of others. As the following discussion makes clear, Frith investigates brain systems involved in the choice of one (...)
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  49.  75
    Commentary on Free Will in the Light of Neuropsychiatry.Christopher D. Frith - 1996 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 3 (2):91-93.
  50.  25
    Corrigendum: Herding in Humans.Ramsey M. Raafat, Nick Chater & Chris Frith - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (12):504.
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