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Christian Diehm [29]Christian Allan Diehm [1]
  1.  25
    American Chestnut Restoration: Accommodating Others or Scaling Up?Christian Diehm - 2023 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 26 (1):69-85.
    The human relationship to trees is arguably as complex as human experience itself. We cohabitate intimately with them as they regulate the systems that sustain us. We use them instrumentally to tra...
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  2.  42
    De-extinction and Deep Questions About Species Conservation.Christian Diehm - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):25-28.
    T. J. Kasperbauer presents an analysis of the ethics of de-extinction that is fairly distinctive in its focus on the welfare of individual animals. But while he is right to express concerns about individual animal well-being, individualism may not be the most important lens through which to view this issue. If one examines more closely what is at issue in de-extinction technologies in relation to species, additional problems appear that cast doubt both on the legitimacy of de-extinction projects, and on (...)
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  3. Should Extinction be Forever? Restitution, Restoration, and Reviving Extinct Species.Christian Diehm - 2015 - Environmental Ethics 37 (2):131-143.
    “De-extinction” projects propose to re-create or “resurrect” extinct species. Perhaps the most common justification offered for these projects is that humans have an obligation to make restitution to species we have eradicated. There are three versions of this argument for de-extinction—one individualistic, one concerned with species, and one that emphasizes ecological restoration—and all three fail to provide a compelling case for species revival. A general critique of de-extinction can be sketched that highlights how it can both facilitate inattentiveness to biological (...)
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  4.  18
    Facing Nature: Levinas and Environmental Thought.William Edelglass, James Hatley & Christian Diehm (eds.) - 2012 - Duquesne University Press.
    "Applies Emmanuel Levinas's thought in approaching environmental philosophy from both humanistic and nonanthropocentric points of view, arguing that themes at the heart of his work--the significance of the ethical, responsibility, alterity, the vulnerability of the body, bearing witness, and politics--are important for thinking about many of our most pressing contemporary environmental questions" --Provided by publisher.
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  5.  15
    Facing Nature: Levinas Beyond the Human.Christian Diehm - 2000 - Philosophy Today 44 (1):51-59.
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  6. Identification with nature: What it is and why it matters.Christian Diehm - 2007 - Ethics and the Environment 12 (2):1-22.
    : This essay examines the content and significance of the notion of "identification" as it appears in the works of theorists of deep ecology. It starts with the most frequently expressed conception of identification—termed "identification-as-belonging"—and distinguishes several different variants of it. After reviewing two criticisms of deep ecology that appear to target this notion, it is argued that there is a second, less frequently noticed type of identification that appears primarily in the work of Arne Naess—"identification-as-kinship." Following this analysis, it (...)
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  7.  98
    Arne Naess and the Task of Gestalt Ontology.Christian Diehm - 2006 - Environmental Ethics 28 (1):21-35.
    While much of Arne Naess’s ecosophy underscores the importance of understanding one’s ecological Self, his analyses of gestaltism are significant in that they center less on questions of the self than on questions of nature and what is other-than-human. Rather than the realization of a more expansive Self, gestalt ontology calls for a “gestalt shift” in our thinking about nature, one that allows for its intrinsic value to emerge clearly. Taking such a gestalt shift as a central task enables Naess (...)
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  8. Arne Naess, Val Plumwood, and deep ecological subjectivity: A contribution to the "deep ecology-ecofeminism debate".Christian Diehm - 2002 - Ethics and the Environment 7 (1):24-38.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Ethics & the Environment 7.1 (2002) 24-38 [Access article in PDF] Arne Naess, Val Plumwood, and Deep Ecological SubjectivityA Contribution to the "Deep Ecology-ecofeminism Debate" Christian Diehm Karen Warren's recent essay, "Ecofeminist Philosophy and Deep Ecology," begins by noting that the philosophical positions found under the heading "deep ecology" are anything but monolithic. This point, which has been overlooked by deep ecologists as often as by others, is crucial (...)
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  9.  49
    Connection to Nature and the Case for Deep Ecology.Christian Diehm - 2022 - Ethics and the Environment 27 (2):59-81.
    Abstract:This essay argues for the continuing import and relevance of deep ecological philosophy by reading it together with explorations of connection to nature in the social sciences. It begins by clarifying deep ecological concepts of "identification" with nature. It then argues that these conceptualizations align with notions of human-nature connectedness employed by social scientists, and that empirical research largely corroborates deep ecologists' claims about the practical significance of a sense of connection to the natural world. Finally, it reviews literature discussing (...)
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  10.  20
    Arne Naess, Val Plumwood, and Deep Ecological Subjectivity A Contribution to The?Deep Ecology-Ecofeminism Debate?.Christian Diehm - 2002 - Ethics and the Environment 7 (1):24-38.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Ethics & the Environment 7.1 (2002) 24-38 [Access article in PDF] Arne Naess, Val Plumwood, and Deep Ecological SubjectivityA Contribution to the "Deep Ecology-ecofeminism Debate" Christian Diehm Karen Warren's recent essay, "Ecofeminist Philosophy and Deep Ecology," begins by noting that the philosophical positions found under the heading "deep ecology" are anything but monolithic. This point, which has been overlooked by deep ecologists as often as by others, is crucial (...)
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  11.  6
    Přírodní neštěstí.Christian Diehm - 2023 - Reflexe: Filosoficky Casopis 2023 (64):93-108.
    Translation of Christian Diehm’s Natural Disasters.
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  12.  38
    Biophilia and Biodiversity.Christian Diehm - 2012 - Environmental Ethics 34 (1):51-66.
    Although Stephen R. Kellert critiques both nonanthropocentric and narrowly anthropocentric approaches to environmental ethics, and proposes instead a broadly anthropocentric position that relies on a distinctive version of the biophilia hypothesis, his portrayal of his position as anthropocentric exposes his work to some common criticisms of human-centered views. However, the version of the biophilia hypothesis that Kellert advocates actually supports a nonanthropocentric environmental ethic, and his example of a shift in public attitudes toward marine mammals can be used to demonstrate (...)
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  13.  12
    Biophilia and Biodiversity.Christian Diehm - 2012 - Environmental Ethics 34 (1):51-66.
    Although Stephen R. Kellert critiques both nonanthropocentric and narrowly anthropocentric approaches to environmental ethics, and proposes instead a broadly anthropocentric position that relies on a distinctive version of the biophilia hypothesis, his portrayal of his position as anthropocentric exposes his work to some common criticisms of human-centered views. However, the version of the biophilia hypothesis that Kellert advocates actually supports a nonanthropocentric environmental ethic, and his example of a shift in public attitudes toward marine mammals can be used to demonstrate (...)
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  14.  20
    Connection to Nature, Deep Ecology, and Conservation Social Science: Human-Nature Bonding and Protecting the Natural World.Christian Diehm - 2020 - Lexington Books.
    This book explores human-nature connectedness through deep ecological philosophy and conservation social science. Emphasizing ecologically-inclusive identities, it argues that connection to nature is more important than many environmental advocates realize and that deep ecology contributes much to the increasingly pressing conversations about it.
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  15.  20
    Darwin and Deep Ecology.Christian Diehm - 2014 - Ethics and the Environment 19 (1):73.
    This essay explores connections between Charles Darwin’s thinking and the writings of theorists in the deep ecology movement. It begins by placing Darwin’s thought in the context of Western attempts to reject teleological descriptions of nature. It then shows that while some authors cite Darwin’s naturalistic view of human origins as a positive contribution to deep ecological thought, the fact that his work also helped eliminate teleological explanations of natural phenomena is problematic for non-anthropocentric environmental ethics. Because of this, the (...)
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  16.  52
    Deep Ecology and Phenomenology.Christian Diehm - 2004 - Environmental Philosophy 1 (2):20-27.
    This essay is written as a companion to the interview “Here I Stand,” and it examines the place of phenomenology in the environmental thought of deep ecologist Arne Naess. Tracing a line through Naess’s somewhat sporadic references to phenomenology, and his comments in the interview, the article argues that Naess’s interest in phenomenology is tied to his attempts to develop an ontology, and tries to show how this project situates Naess in relation to several phenomenologists. The essay concludes with some (...)
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  17.  29
    Ethics and Natural History.Christian Diehm - 2006 - Environmental Philosophy 3 (2):34-43.
    This essay questions the place of other-than-human animals in Levinas’s thought. After detailing how animals and animality figure in Levinas’s work, it is claimed that his ethical exclusion of animals is due to a conception of animals as wholly accountable for in terms of species-being, wholly within “naturalhistory.” It is then suggested that Levinas’s position is ill-founded, and at odds with his claims about the importance of suffering and the vulnerable body in the encounter with the other. The essay concludes (...)
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  18.  31
    Finding a Niche for Species in Nature Ethics.Christian Diehm - 2012 - Ethics and the Environment 17 (1):71-86.
    This essay examines the relationship between Marti Kheel’s ecofeminism, particularly as articulated in her recent book Nature Ethics, and holistic eco-philosophy. It begins by arguing that while Kheel’s view shares some common ground with holistic thinkers, her position is best understood as one that re-conceives the meaning of holism. Next, her comments on species preservation are discussed both to show her individualism, and to highlight a weakness in her approach to issues involving at-risk species. It is then suggested that one (...)
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  19.  62
    Gaia and Il y a.Christian Diehm - 2003 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 7 (2):173-183.
  20.  2
    Gaia and Il y a.Christian Diehm - 2003 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 7 (2):173-183.
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  21.  27
    Deep Ecology and Phenomenology.Christian Diehm - 2004 - Environmental Philosophy 1 (2):20-27.
    This essay is written as a companion to the interview “Here I Stand,” and it examines the place of phenomenology in the environmental thought of deep ecologist Arne Naess. Tracing a line through Naess’s somewhat sporadic references to phenomenology, and his comments in the interview, the article argues that Naess’s interest in phenomenology is tied to his attempts to develop an ontology, and tries to show how this project situates Naess in relation to several phenomenologists. The essay concludes with some (...)
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  22.  7
    Here I Stand.Christian Diehm - 2004 - Environmental Philosophy 1 (2):6-19.
    The following interview was conducted by Christian Diehm in the home of Arne Naess near Oslo, Norway, in December of 2001. At eighty-nine years of age, Naess was preparing for the English-language release of his latest book, Life’s Philosophy. We are pleased to provide a transcript of a large part of the conversations that spanned two afternoon dialogues.
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  23.  10
    Levinas beyond the human.Christian Diehm - 2005 - In Claire Elise Katz & Lara Trout (eds.), Emmanuel Levinas. Routledge. pp. 4--1.
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  24.  42
    Minding Nature.Christian Diehm - 2010 - Environmental Ethics 32 (1):3-16.
    It has been claimed that Val Plumwood’s work is vulnerable to the same charge of “assimi­lationism” that she has leveled against moral extensionist viewpoints. It is argued that while one might regard Plumwood’s position as suspect because of its emphasis on human-nature continuity, associating claims of continuity with assimilationism could lead one to seek a mode of relating to nature as absolutely other, a move which is claimed to be problematic for several reasons. Because the extensionist error is not simply (...)
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  25.  18
    Minding Nature.Christian Diehm - 2010 - Environmental Ethics 32 (1):3-16.
    It has been claimed that Val Plumwood’s work is vulnerable to the same charge of “assimi­lationism” that she has leveled against moral extensionist viewpoints. It is argued that while one might regard Plumwood’s position as suspect because of its emphasis on human-nature continuity, associating claims of continuity with assimilationism could lead one to seek a mode of relating to nature as absolutely other, a move which is claimed to be problematic for several reasons. Because the extensionist error is not simply (...)
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  26.  51
    Staying True to Trees.Christian Diehm - 2008 - Environmental Philosophy 5 (2):3-16.
    This essay examines how becoming familiar with trees in their specificity might impact how we position ourselves in the ongoing debate among environmental philosophers regarding anthropocentric and non-anthropocentric approaches to environmental ethics. It begins with an analysis of what the process of learning to identify trees entails, and a discussion of how this often involves the development of non-instrumentalist evaluative attitudes towards them, an axiological orientation at odds with the instrumental reductivism characteristic of anthropocentric views. It is then argued that (...)
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  27.  5
    Troubled Waters: Religion, Ethics, and the Global Water Crisis.Christian Diehm - 2009 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 19 (1):85-88.
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