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  1.  26
    When Time Becomes Personal. Aging and Personal Identity.Christian Sternad - 2021 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 20 (2):311-319.
    Aging is an integral part of human existence. The problem of aging addresses the most fundamental coordinates of our lives but also the ones of the phenomenological method: time, embodiment, subjectivity and intersubjectivity, and even the social norms that grow into the very notion of aging as such. In my article, I delineate a phenomenological analysis of aging and show how such an analysis connects with the debate concerning personal identity: I claim that aging is not merely a physical process, (...)
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  2.  5
    Violence and Meaning.Lode Lauwaert, Laura Katherine Smith & Christian Sternad (eds.) - 2019 - Springer Verlag.
    This edited collection explores the problem of violence from the vantage point of meaning. Taking up the ambiguity of the word ‘meaning’, the chapters analyse the manner in which violence affects and in some cases constitutes the meaningful structure of our lifeworld, on individual, social, religious and conceptual levels. The relationship between violence and meaning is multifaceted, and is thus investigated from a variety of different perspectives within the continental tradition of philosophy, including phenomenology, post-structuralism, critical theory and psychoanalysis. Divided (...)
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  3.  31
    Max Scheler and Jan Patočka on the First World War.Christian Sternad - 2017 - Labyrinth: An International Journal for Philosophy, Value Theory and Sociocultural Hermeneutics 19 (1):89-106.
    The First World War was both an historical and a philosophical event. Philosophers engaged in what Kurt Flasch aptly called "the spiritual mobilization" of philosophy. Max Scheler was particularly important among these "war philosophers", given that he was the one who penned some of the most influential philosophical writings of the First World War, among them Der Genius des Krieges und der Deutsche Krieg. As I aim to show, Max Scheler's war writings were crucial for Jan Patočka's interpretation of the (...)
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  4.  14
    Being Capable of Death: Remarks on the Death of the Animal From a Phenomenological Perspective.Christian Sternad - 2017 - Studia Phaenomenologica 17:101-118.
    In this article, I investigate how phenomenologists have analysed the relation between man and animal with respect to death. The common tendency of most phenomenologists is to grant man a specific mode of being and to attribute a parallel but deficient mode to the animal. In this way, phenomenology fails to accomplish a positive phenomenological description of the animal’s mode of being or of animality as such. I turn to Heidegger’s decisive analysis of human/animal death since Heidegger would constantly hold (...)
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  5. Phänomenologie Und Philosophische Anthropologie.Günther Pöltner & Christian Sternad (eds.) - 2011 - Königshausen & Neumann.
  6.  1
    Figuren der Transzendenz. Transformationen eines phänomenologischen Grundbegriffs.Michael Staudigl & Christian Sternad - 2014 - Königshausen & Neumann.
  7.  14
    The Holding Back of Decline: Scheler, Patočka, and Ricoeur on Death and the Afterlife.Christian Sternad - 2017 - Meta: Research in Hermeneutics, Phenomenology, and Practical Philosophy 9 (2):536-559.
    Jan Patočka and Paul Ricoeur are well known for their accounts of history and the historical understanding of human life. Lesser known are their phenomenological accounts of death and the afterlife. Although their thoughts are available only in fragments, they show a peculiar theoretical richness, as their conceptions of the afterlife are connected to fundamental topics like history, intersubjectivity and memory. In my article, I will attempt to shed light on these fragments, to show how they are embedded in already (...)
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  8.  8
    On the Verge of Subjectivity: Phenomenologies of Death.Christian Sternad - 2020 - In Iulian Apostolescu (ed.), The Subject of Phenomenology. Rereading Husserl. Springer. pp. 231-243.
    This article analyzes various phenomenological approaches to death and articulates how these approaches affect their respective conceptions of subjectivity. Since death interrupts the correlation between the subject and the object, it puts into question the fundamental premises of the phenomenological method. If a phenomenon can only appear for a subject, then how can phenomenology deal with a phenomenon that ends subjectivity? By going through classical positions, I seek to demonstrate that one can only gain a full picture of human mortality (...)
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  9.  11
    Phänomenologie der Gewalt.Christian Sternad - 2017 - Studia Phaenomenologica 17:428-432.
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  10.  7
    The Reasons of Europe: Edmund Husserl, Jan Patočka, and María Zambrano on the Spiritual Heritage of Europe.Christian Sternad - 2018 - History of European Ideas 44 (7):864-875.
    ABSTRACTThis article investigates the genuinely philosophical engagement with the idea of Europe twentieth century philosophy. Here, especially phenomenology has developed a distinct tradition of conceiving Europe not as a geographical and political entity but rather as a ‘spiritual shape.’ Husserl, as the originator of this thought, traces this spiritual Europe back to Ancient Greece of the 7/6 century B.C. in which an unprecedented ‘theoretical attitude’ towards the world originated. Hence, Europe is conceived as a project of reason, of pure rationality (...)
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