Results for 'Christina Joanne Van Dyke'

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  1.  4
    Van Dyke: Medieval Philosophy, 4-Vol. Set.Christina Van Dyke & Andrew Arlig (eds.) - 2019 - London: Routledge.
    The Middle Ages saw a great flourishing of philosophy. Now, to help students and researchers make sense of the gargantuan—and, often, dauntingly complex—body of literature on the main traditions of thinking that stem from the Greek heritage of late antiquity, this new four-volume collection is the latest addition to Routledge’s acclaimed Critical Concepts in Philosophy series. Christina Van Dyke of Calvin College, USA, and an editor of the Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy, has carefully assembled classic contributions, as (...)
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  2. Not Properly a Person: The Rational Soul and ‘Thomistic Substance Dualism’.Christina Van Dyke - 2009 - Faith and Philosophy 26 (2):186-204.
    Like Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas holds that the rational soul is the substantial form of the human body. In so doing, he takes himself to be rejecting a Platonic version of substance dualism; his criticisms, however, apply equally to a traditional understanding of Cartesian dualism. Aquinas’s own peculiar brand of dualism is receiving increased attention from contemporary philosophers—especially those attracted to positions that fall between Cartesian substance dualism and reductive materialism. What Aquinas’s own view amounts to, however, is subject to debate. (...)
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  3. The End of (Human) Life as We Know It.Christina Van Dyke - 2012 - Modern Schoolman 89 (3-4):243-257.
    Is the being in an irreversible persistent vegetative state as the result of a horrible accident numerically identical to the human person, Lindsay, who existed before the accident? Many proponents of Thomistic metaphysics have argued that Aquinas’s answer to this question must be “yes.” In particular, it seems that Aquinas’s commitment to both Aristotelian hylomorphism and the unity of substantial form (viz., that each body/soul composite possesses one and only one substantial form) entails the position that the human person remains (...)
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  4.  4
    A Companion to Philosophy in the Middle Ages, Eds. J.J. E. Gracia, Timothy Noone. [REVIEW]Christina Van Dyke - 2006 - Philosophia Christi 8 (1):202-204.
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  5.  29
    The Cambridge Translations of Medieval Philosophical Texts, Vol. 3: Mind and Knowledge. [REVIEW]Christina Van Dyke - 2004 - Philosophical Review 113 (4):567-571.
    In their introduction to the first volume of The Cambridge Translations of Medieval Philosophical Texts, Norman Kretzmann and Eleonore Stump—the founding editors of this series—noted the lack of access contemporary scholars have to medieval texts, commenting that “Most of the surviving philosophical literature of the Middle Ages is still unavailable in printed editions of the Latin texts, let alone translations into modern languages”. They then explained that both “this volume and its projected successors … have the broader aim of alleviating (...)
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  6.  3
    Theology at Paris 1316-1345: Peter Auriol and the Problem of Divine Foreknowledge and Future Contingents. [REVIEW]Christina Van Dyke - 2003 - Philosophia Christi 5 (2):603-605.
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  7. Aquinas’s Shiny Happy People: Perfect Happiness and the Limits of Human Nature.Christina Van Dyke - 2014 - In Oxford Studies in the Philosophy of Religion. pp. 269-291.
    In Aquinas's account of the beatific vision, human beings are joined to God in a never-ending act of contemplation of the divine essence: a state which utterly fulfills the human drive for knowledge and satisfies every desire of the human heart. In this paper, I argue that this state represents less a fulfillment of human nature, however, than a transcendence of that nature. Furthermore, what’s transcended is not incidental on a metaphysical, epistemological, or moral level.
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  8.  20
    The Cambridge Translations of Medieval Philosophical Texts, Vol. 3: Mind and Knowledge. [REVIEW]Christina Van Dyke - 2004 - Philosophical Review 113 (4):567-571.
    In their introduction to the first volume of The Cambridge Translations of Medieval Philosophical Texts, Norman Kretzmann and Eleonore Stump—the founding editors of this series—noted the lack of access contemporary scholars have to medieval texts, commenting that “Most of the surviving philosophical literature of the Middle Ages is still unavailable in printed editions of the Latin texts, let alone translations into modern languages”. They then explained that both “this volume and its projected successors … have the broader aim of alleviating (...)
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  9. Manly Meat and Gendered Eating: Correcting Imbalance and Seeking Virtue.Christina Van Dyke - 2016 - In Andrew Chignell, Terence Cuneo & Matthew C. Halteman (eds.), Philosophy Comes to Dinner: Arguments on the Ethics of Eating. New York: Routledge Press. pp. 39-55.
    The ecofeminist argument for veganism is powerful. Meat consumption is a deeply gendered act that is closely tied to the systematic objectification of women and nonhuman animals. I worry, however, that presenting veganism as "the" moral ideal might reinforce rather than alleviate the disordered status quo in gendered eating, further disadvantaging women in patriarchal power structures. In this chapter, I advocate a feminist account of ethical eating that treats dietary choices as moral choices insofar as they constitute an integral part (...)
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  10. I See Dead People: Disembodied Souls and Aquinas’s ‘Two-Person’ Problem.Christina Van Dyke - 2014 - In Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy. pp. 25-45.
    Aquinas’s account of the human soul is the key to his theory of human nature. The soul’s nature as the substantial form of the human body appears at times to be in tension with its nature as immaterial intellect, however, and nowhere is this tension more evident than in Aquinas’s discussion of the ‘separated’ soul. In this paper I use the Biblical story of the rich man and Lazarus (which Aquinas took to involve actual separated souls) to highlight what I (...)
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  11.  6
    Aquinas's Moral Theory: Essays in Honor of Norman Kretzmann. [REVIEW]Christina Van Dyke - 2001 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (1):143-144.
  12. The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy.Robert Pasnau & Christina Van Dyke (eds.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy comprises over fifty specially commissioned essays by experts on the philosophy of this period. Starting in the late eighth century, with the renewal of learning some centuries after the fall of the Roman Empire, a sequence of chapters takes the reader through developments in many and varied fields, including logic and language, natural philosophy, ethics, metaphysics, and theology. Close attention is paid to the context of medieval philosophy, with discussions of the rise of the (...)
     
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  13. Mysticism.Christina Van Dyke - 2010 - In The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy. pp. 720-734.
    Rather than dismissing mysticism as irrelevant to the study of medieval philosophy, this chapter identifies the two forms of mysticism most prevalent in the Middle Ages from the twelfth to the early fifteenth century - the apophatic and affective traditions - and examines the intersections of those traditions with three topics of medieval philosophical interests: the relative importance of intellect and will, the implications of the Incarnation for attitudes towards the human body and the material world, and the proper relation (...)
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  14. Self-Knowledge, Abnegation, and Ful Llment in Medieval Mysticism.Christina Van Dyke - 2016 - In Ursula Renz (ed.), Self-Knowledge. Oxford University Press. pp. 131-145.
    Self-knowledge is a persistent—and paradoxical—theme in medieval mysticism, which portrays our ultimate goal as union with the divine. Union with God is often taken to involve a cognitive and/or volitional merging that requires the loss of a sense of self as distinct from the divine. Yet affective mysticism—which emphasizes the passion of the incarnate Christ and portrays physical and emotional mystical experiences as inherently valuable—was in fact the dominant tradition in the later Middle Ages. An examination of both the affective (...)
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  15.  3
    Knuuttila, S. -Emotions in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. [REVIEW]Christina Van Dyke - 2006 - Philosophical Books 47 (2):155-157.
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  16. What Has History to Do with Philosophy? Insights From the Medieval Contemplative Tradition.Christina Van Dyke - 2018 - Proceedings of the British Academy 214:155-170.
    This paper highlights the corrective and complementary role that historically informed philosophy can play in contemporary discussions. What it takes for an experience to count as genuinely mystical has been the source of significant controversy; most current philosophical definitions of ‘mystical experience’ exclude embodied, non-unitive states -- but, in so doing, they exclude the majority of reported mystical experiences. I use a re- examination of the full range of reported medieval mystical experiences (both in the apophatic tradition, which excludes or (...)
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  17. Discipline and the Docile Body: Regulating Hungers in the Capitol.Christina Van Dyke - 2012 - In G. Dunn & N. Michaud (eds.), The Hunger Games and Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 250-264.
    When Katniss first arrives in the Capitol, she is both amazed and repulsed by the dramatic body- modifications and frivolous lives of its citizens. “What do they do all day, these people in the Capitol,” she wonders, “besides decorating their bodies and waiting around for a new shipment of tributes to roll in and die for their entertainment?” In this paper, I argue that the more time and energy the Capitol citizens focus on body-modification and their social lives, the more (...)
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  18.  28
    The End of Life as We Know It: Thomas Aquinas on Persons, Bodies and Death.Christina Van Dyke - 2012 - Modern Schoolman 89 (3/4):243-257.
    Is the being in an irreversible persistent vegetative state as the result of a horrible accident numerically identical to the human person, Lindsay, who existed before the accident? Many proponents of Thomistic metaphysics have argued that Aquinas’s answer to this question must be “yes.” In particular, it seems that Aquinas’s commitment to both Aristotelian hylomorphism and the unity of substantial form entails the position that the human person remains alive as long as biological life persists. I argue, however, that although (...)
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  19. The Truth, the Whole Truth, and Nothing but the Truth: Robert Grosseteste on Universals (and the Posterior Analytics ).Christina Van Dyke - 2010 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (2):pp. 153-170.
    The reintroduction of Aristotle's Analytics to the Latin West—in particular, the reintroduction of the Posterior Analytics—forever altered the course of medieval epistemological discussions. Although the Analytics fell decidedly from grace in later centuries, the sophisticated account of human cognition developed in the Posterior Analytics appealed so strongly to thirteenth-century European scholars that it became one of the two central theories of knowledge advocated in the later Middle Ages. Robert Grosseteste's 'Commentarius in Posteriorum Analyticorum Libro', written in the 1220s, is most (...)
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  20. Aquinas's Shiny Happy People: Perfect Happiness and the Limits of Human Nature.Christina van Dyke - 2015 - Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion 6:269-292.
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  21. Eat Y’Self Fitter: Orthorexia, Health, and Gender.Christina Van Dyke - 2017 - In Anne Barnhill, Mark Budolfson & Tyler Doggett (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Food Ethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 553-571.
    Orthorexia is a condition in which the subject becomes obsessed with identifying and maintaining the ideal diet, rigidly avoiding foods perceived as unhealthy or harmful. In this paper, I examine widespread cultural factors that provide particularly fertile ground for the development of orthorexia, drawing out social and historical connections between religion and orthorexia (which literally means “righteous eating”), and also addressing how ambiguities in the concept of “health” make it particularly prone to take on quasi-religious significance. I argue that what (...)
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  22. Eating as a Gendered Act: Christianity, Feminism, and Reclaiming the Body.Christina Van Dyke - 2008 - In K. J. Clark (ed.), Readings in the Philosophy of Religion, 2nd Edition. Peterborough: Broadview Press. pp. 475-489.
    In current society, eating is most definitely a gendered act: that is, what we eat and how we eat it factors in both the construction and the performance of gender. Furthermore, eating is a gendered act with consequences that go far beyond whether one orders a steak or a salad for dinner. In the first half of this paper, I identify the dominant myths surrounding both female and male eating, and I show that those myths contribute in important ways to (...)
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  23. “Many Know Much but Do Not Know Themselves”: Self-Knowledge, Humility, and Perfection in the Medieval Affective Contemplative Tradition.Christina Van Dyke - 2018 - Proceedings of the Society for Medieval Logic and Metaphysics 14 (Consciousness and Self-Knowledge):89-106.
    Today, philosophers interested in self-knowledge usually look to the scholastic tradition, where the topic is addressed in a systematic and familiar way. Contemporary conceptions of what medieval figures thought about self-knowledge thus skew toward the epistemological. In so doing, however, they often fail to capture the crucial ethical and theological importance that self-knowledge possesses throughout the Middle Ages. -/- Human beings are not transparent to themselves: in particular, knowing oneself in the way needed for moral progress requires hard and rigorous (...)
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  24. An Aristotelian Theory of Divine Illumination: Robert Grosseteste's Commentary on the Posterior Analytics.Christina Van Dyke - 2009 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (4):685-704.
    Two central accounts of human cognition emerge over the course of the Middle Ages: the theory of divine illumination and an Aristotelian theory centered on abstraction from sense data. Typically, these two accounts are seen as competing views of the origins of human knowledge; theories of divine illumination focus on God’s direct intervention in our epistemic lives, whereas Aristotelian theories generally claim that our knowledge derives primarily (or even entirely) from sense perception. In this paper, I address an early attempt (...)
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  25.  4
    I See Dead People.Christina Van Dyke - 2014 - Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 2 (1).
    This chapter addresses a difficulty facing Aquinas’s view of post-mortem identity that is posed by his account of the separated soul. Called the Two-Person Problem, the difficulty is that—although Aquinas denies that the human soul is identical to either the human being or the human person—the disembodied soul has agency and self-reference in the period between death and bodily resurrection. If the soul is not identical to you, however, who is it? And how can you be brought back at the (...)
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  26. The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy 2 Volume Paperback Set.Robert Pasnau & Christina van Dyke (eds.) - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy comprises over fifty specially commissioned essays by experts on the philosophy of this period. Starting in the late eighth century, with the renewal of learning some centuries after the fall of the Roman Empire, a sequence of chapters takes the reader through developments in many and varied fields, including logic and language, natural philosophy, ethics, metaphysics, and theology. Close attention is paid to the context of medieval philosophy, with discussions of the rise of the (...)
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  27. Book Review. [REVIEW]Christina Van Dyke - 2003 - Philosophia Christi 5 (2):603-604.
     
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  28. Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy.Christina Van Dyke - 2014
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  29.  18
    The Specification of Human Actions in St. Thomas Aquinas. Joseph Pilsner. [REVIEW]Christina Van Dyke - 2008 - Speculum 83 (1):233-234.
  30.  18
    The Soul, by William of Auvergne. [REVIEW]Christina Van Dyke - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (3):456-458.
  31.  12
    Thomas Williams (Editor and Translator), Anselm: Three Philosophical Dialogues_. [REVIEW]Christina Van Dyke - 2002 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (8).
  32.  38
    Aquinas's Ethics: Metaphysical Foundations, Moral Theory and Theological Context. By Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung, Colleen McCluskey and Christina Van Dyke. Pp. 264, Notre Dame IN, University of Notre Dame Press, 2009, $30.00. [REVIEW]Patrick Riordan - 2012 - Heythrop Journal 53 (4):711-712.
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  33. Human Identity, Immanent Causal Relations, and the Principle of Non-Repeatability: Thomas Aquinas on the Bodily Resurrection.Christina van Dyke - 2007 - Religious Studies 43 (4):373 - 394.
    Can the persistence of a human being's soul at death and prior to the bodily resurrection be sufficient to guarantee that the resurrected human being is numerically identical to the human being who died? According to Thomas Aquinas, it can. Yet, given that Aquinas holds that the human being is identical to the composite of soul and body and ceases to exist at death, it's difficult to see how he can maintain this view. In this paper, I address Aquinas's response (...)
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  34.  13
    The Soul.Christina Van Dyke - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (3):456-458.
    One of the biggest challenges facing both students and scholars working in the field of medieval philosophy involves the inaccessibility of relevant texts. Reliable Latin editions often just aren’t available, even for works by such central figures as Thomas Aquinas and Duns Scotus; furthermore, it’s difficult to find English translations of any but the most significant works in medieval philosophy, much less readable translations that remain faithful to the original text. The paucity of English translations is especially unfortunate, since it (...)
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  35. Aquinas's Ethics: Metaphysical Foundations, Moral Theory, and Theological Context.Rebecca DeYoung, Colleen McCluskey & Christina VanDyke - 2009 - University of Notre Dame Press.
    The purpose of __Aquinas's Ethics__ is to place Thomas Aquinas's moral theory in its full philosophical and theological context and to do so in a way that makes Aquinas readily accessible to students and interested general readers, including those encountering Aquinas for the first time. Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung, Colleen McCluskey, and Christina Van Dyke begin by explaining Aquinas's theories of the human person and human action, since these ground his moral theory. In their interpretation, Aquinas's theological commitments crucially (...)
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  36.  19
    Low Working Memory Capacity is Only Spuriously Related to Poor Reading Comprehension.Julie A. Van Dyke, Clinton L. Johns & Anuenue Kukona - 2014 - Cognition 131 (3):373-403.
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  37.  39
    Computational Principles of Working Memory in Sentence Comprehension.Richard L. Lewis, Shravan Vasishth & Julie A. Van Dyke - 2006 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (10):447-454.
  38.  23
    Computational Principles of Working Memory in Sentence Comprehension.Julie A. Van Dyke Richard L. Lewis, Shravan Vasishth - 2006 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (10):447.
  39. The Parable of the Sower Beneath the Surface of Multicultural Issues The Narrow Neck of Land.Elder Paul V. Johnson, Blair G. Van Dyke, Jared M. Halverson, Sidney R. Sandstrom, Eric-Jon K. Marlowe, John Hilton Iii, Jordan Tanner, Nick Eastmond, Clyde L. Livingston & A. Paul King - 2008 - The Religious Educator 9 (3).
     
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  40.  14
    Discerning the Division of Cognitive Labor: An Emerging Understanding of How Knowledge Is Clustered in Other Minds.Frank C. Keil, Courtney Stein, Lisa Webb, Van Dyke Billings & Leonid Rozenblit - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (2):259-300.
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  41.  7
    Applications of Distributed Artificial Intelligence in Industry.H. Van Dyke Parunak - 1996 - In N. Jennings & G. O'Hare (eds.), Foundations of Distributed Artificial Intelligence. Wiley. pp. 139-164.
  42.  6
    Born From Below: Urban Regeneration Through Incarnational Theological Formation in Guatemala City and Beyond.Michael L. Ribbens & Joel Van Dyke - 2018 - Hts Theological Studies 74 (3).
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  43.  10
    Poor Readers' Retrieval Mechanism: Efficient Access is Not Dependent on Reading Skill.Clinton L. Johns, Kazunaga Matsuki & Julie A. Van Dyke - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  44.  1
    Semantic and Syntactic Interference in Sentence Comprehension: A Comparison of Working Memory Models.Yingying Tan, Randi C. Martin & Julie A. Van Dyke - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  45.  13
    Using the Visual World Paradigm to Study Retrieval Interference in Spoken Language Comprehension.Irina A. Sekerina, Luca Campanelli & Julie A. Van Dyke - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  46. Collective Entities and Moral Rights.V. van Dyke - 1995 - In Julia Stapleton (ed.), Group Rights: Perspectives Since 1900. Thoemmes Press.
  47.  47
    Political Science: A Philosophical Analysis.Vernon Van Dyke - 1960 - London: Stevens.
  48.  71
    Teaching Ethical Analysis in Environmental Management Decisions: A Process-Oriented Approach.Fred Van Dyke - 2005 - Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (4):659-669.
    The general public and environmental policy makers often perceive management actions of environmental managers as “science,” when such actions are, in fact, value judgments about when to intervene in natural processes. The choice of action requires ethical as well as scientific analysis because managers must choose a normative outcome to direct their intervention. I examine a management case study involving prescribed burning of sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) communities in south-central Montana (USA) to illustrate how to teach students to ethically evaluate a (...)
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  49.  10
    Educational Reform in Post-Accord Palestine: A Synthesis of Palestinian Perspectives.Blair G. Van Dyke & E. Vance Randall - 2002 - Educational Studies 28 (1):17-32.
    Education is central to the preservation and success of any society, including that of the Palestinians. With the signing of the Peace Accords in 1993, Palestinians now have their first opportunity in nearly 500 years to control and develop their own educational system, a system that will better meet the needs of the Palestinians than those nations who have controlled the Palestinians for so many years. With this singular opportunity, the questions now becomes one of determining the nature of this (...)
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  50.  7
    Carolynn Van Dyke, Ed., Rethinking Chaucerian Beasts. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012. Pp. Xiv, 286. $90. ISBN: 978-0-230-33858-6.Table of Contents Available Online at Http://Www.Palgrave.Com/Page/Detail/?Sf1=Id_product&St1=537953. [REVIEW]Peter W. Travis - 2016 - Speculum 91 (1):264-266.
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