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  1. Magic, Semantics, and Putnam's Vat Brains.Mark Sprevak & Christina McLeish - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 35 (2):227-236.
    In this paper we offer an exegesis of Hilary Putnam’s classic argument against the brain-in-avat hypothesis offered in his Reason, truth and history (1981). In it, Putnam argues that we cannot be brains in a vat because the semantics of the situation make it incoherent for anyone to wonder whether they are a brain a vat. Putnam’s argument is that in order for ‘I am a brain in a vat’ to be true, the person uttering it would have to be (...)
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  2.  96
    Am I a Rodent?McLeish Christina - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 38 (3):668-677.
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  3. Am I a Rodent?Christina McLeish - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 38 (3):668-677.
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  4. Magic, Semantics, and Putnam’s Vat Brains.Mark Sprevak & Christina Mcleish - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 35 (2):227-236.
    In this paper we offer an exegesis of Hilary Putnam’s classic argument against the brain-in-a-vat hypothesis offered in his Reason, truth and history. In it, Putnam argues that we cannot be brains in a vat because the semantics of the situation make it incoherent for anyone to wonder whether they are a brain in a vat. Putnam’s argument is that in order for ‘I am a brain in a vat’ to be true, the person uttering it would have to be (...)
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  5.  44
    Realism Bit by Bit: Part II. Disjunctive Partial Reference.Christina McLeish - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 37 (2):171--190.
    In this second paper, I continue my discussion of the problem of reference for scientific realism. First, I consider a final objection to Kitcher's account of reference, which I generalise to other accounts of reference. Such accounts make attributions of reference by appeal to our pretheoretical intuitions about how true statements ought to be distibuted among the scientific utterances of the past. I argue that in the cases that merit discussion, this strategy fails because our intuitions are unstable. The interesting (...)
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    Scientific Realism Bit by Bit: Part I. Kitcher on Reference.Christina McLeish - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 36 (4):668--686.
    In this paper, I consider Kitcher 's account of reference for the expressions of past science. Kitcher 's case study is of Joseph Priestley and his expression `dephlogisticated air'. There is a strong intuitive case that `dephlogisticated air' referred to oxygen, but it was underpinned by very mistaken phlogiston theory, so concluding either that dephlogisticated air referred straightforwardly or that it failed to refer both have unpalatable consequences. Kitcher argues that the reference of such terms is best considered relative to (...)
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