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Christine Wieseler [10]Christine Marie Wieseler [1]
  1.  60
    Epistemic Oppression and Ableism in Bioethics.Christine Wieseler - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (4):714-732.
    Disabled people face obstacles to participation in epistemic communities that would be beneficial for making sense of our experiences and are susceptible to epistemic oppression. Knowledge and skills grounded in disabled people's experiences are treated as unintelligible within an ableist hermeneutic, specifically, the dominant conception of disability as lack. My discussion will focus on a few types of epistemic oppression—willful hermeneutical ignorance, epistemic exploitation, and epistemic imperialism—as they manifest in some bioethicists’ claims about and interactions with disabled people. One of (...)
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  2.  68
    Missing Phenomenological Accounts: Disability Theory, Body Integrity Identity Disorder, and Being an Amputee.Christine Wieseler - 2018 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 11 (2):83-111.
    Phenomenology provides a method for disability theorists to describe embodied subjectivity lacking within the social model of disability. Within the literature on body integrity identity disorder, dominant narratives of disability are influential, individual bodies are considered in isolation, and experiences of disabled people are omitted. Research on BIID tends to incorporate an individualist ontology. In this article, I argue that Merleau-Ponty's conceptualization of “being in the world,” which recognizes subjectivity as embodied and intersubjective, provides a better starting point for research (...)
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  3.  58
    Objectivity as Neutrality, Nondisabled Ignorance, and Strong Objectivity in Biomedical Ethics.Christine Wieseler - 2016 - Social Philosophy Today 32:85-106.
    This paper focuses on epistemic practices within biomedical ethics that are related to disability. These practices are one of the reasons that there is tension between biomedical ethicists and disability advocates. I argue that appeals to conceptual neutrality regarding disability, which Anita Silvers recommends, are counterproductive. Objectivity as neutrality serves to obscure the social values and interests that inform epistemic practices. Drawing on feminist standpoint theory and epistemologies of ignorance, I examine ways that appeals to objectivity as neutrality serve to (...)
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  4.  37
    A Philosophical Investigation.Christine Wieseler - 2012 - Social Philosophy Today 28:29-45.
    Sometimes beliefs that are shared are treated as if they are knowledge in spite of a lack of evidence or even in the face of evidence to the contrary. Beliefs informed by prejudices and ignorance about people with disabilities are often treated as certain and reinforced by social practices. In this paper, I distinguish between knowledge claims and beliefs that are treated as if they are true. I use Wittgenstein’s account of the connection between epistemic and other social practices in (...)
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  5.  29
    Care and exploitation in precarious employment in academic philosophy.Christine Wieseler - forthcoming - Journal of Social Philosophy.
    Journal of Social Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  6.  34
    Thinking Critically about Disability in Biomedical Ethics Courses.Christine Wieseler - 2015 - American Association of Philosophy Teachers Studies in Pedagogy 1:82-97.
    Several studies have shown that nondisabled people—especially healthcare professionals—tend to judge the quality of life of disabled people to be much lower than disabled people themselves report. In part, this is due to dominant narratives about disability. Teachers of biomedical ethics courses have the opportunity to help students to think critically about disability. This may involve interrogating our own assumptions, given the pervasiveness of ableism. This article is intended to facilitate reflection on narratives about disability. After discussing two readings that (...)
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  7. Applying Merleau-Ponty's Account of Perceptual Practices to Teaching on Disability.Christine Wieseler - 2013 - Florida Philosophical Review 13 (1):14-28.
    This paper provides suggestions for educators who have a desire to learn about, or are already committed to, challenging ableism and disablism. As philosophy teachers, we have the opportunity to facilitate student reflection regarding disability, which puts students in a position to make decisions about whether to retain their habitual ways of comporting themselves toward disabled people or to begin the process of forming new perceptual practices. I contend that existential phenomenology, as formulated by Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Linda Martín Alcoff, (...)
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  8.  9
    The Import of Critical Phenomenology for Theorizing Disability.Christine Wieseler - 2023 - Journal of Philosophy of Disability 3:116-146.
    In this paper, I explore the claim that phenomenological accounts grounded in the lived experiences of those most tangibly impacted by social norms related to ability can provide crucial correctives and supplements to the existing philosophical literature on disability. After situating discussions of the body within disability theory and debates over the impairment/disability distinction in philosophy of disability more specifically, I argue that extant models are inadequate for theorizing subjective experiences of living as a disabled person. I then develop an (...)
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  9. The Disability Bioethics Reader.Joel Michael Reynolds & Christine Wieseler (eds.) - 2022 - Oxford; New York: Routledge.
    Introductory and advanced textbooks in bioethics focus almost entirely on issues that disproportionately affect disabled people and that centrally deal with becoming or being disabled. However, such textbooks typically omit critical philosophical reflection on disability, lack engagement with decades of empirical and theoretical scholarship spanning the social sciences and humanities in the multidisciplinary field of disability studies, and avoid serious consideration of the history of disability activism in shaping social, legal, political, and medical understandings of disability over the last fifty (...)
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  10.  2
    The Desexualization of Disabled People as Existential Harm and the Importance of Ambiguity.Christine Wieseler - 2022 - In Talia Welch & Susan Bredlau (eds.), Normality, Abnormality, and Pathology in Merleau-Ponty. SUNY Press. pp. 225-247.
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