13 found
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  1. The Influence of People’s Culture and Prior Experiences with Aibo on Their Attitude Towards Robots.Christoph Bartneck, Tomohiro Suzuki, Takayuki Kanda & Tatsuya Nomura - 2007 - AI and Society 21 (1-2):217-230.
    This paper presents a cross-cultural study on peoples’ negative attitude toward robots. 467 participants from seven different countries filled in the negative attitude towards robots scale survey which consists of 14 questions in three clusters: attitude towards the interaction with robots, attitude towards social influence of robots and attitude towards emotions in interaction with robots. Around one half of them were recruited at local universities and the other half was approached through Aibo online communities. The participants’ cultural background had a (...)
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  2. Anthropomorphism: Opportunities and Challenges in Human-Robot Interaction.Diane Proudfoot, Jakub Zlotowski, Kumar Yogeeswaran & Christoph Bartneck - 2015 - International Journal of Social Robotics 7 (3):347-360.
    Anthropomorphism is a phenomenon that describes the human tendency to see human-like shapes in the environment. It has considerable consequences for people’s choices and beliefs. With the increased presence of robots, it is important to investigate the optimal design for this tech- nology. In this paper we discuss the potential benefits and challenges of building anthropomorphic robots, from both a philosophical perspective and from the viewpoint of empir- ical research in the fields of human–robot interaction and social psychology. We believe (...)
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  3.  26
    Exploring the Abuse of Robots.Christoph Bartneck & Jun Hu - 2008 - Interaction Studies 9 (3):415-433.
    Robots have been introduced into our society, but their social role is still unclear. A critical issue is whether the robot’s exhibition of intelligent behaviour leads to the users’ perception of the robot as being a social actor, similar to the way in which people treat computers and media as social actors. The first experiment mimicked Stanley Milgram’s obedience experiment, but on a robot. The participants were asked to administer electric shocks to a robot, and the results show that people (...)
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  4.  6
    Exploring the Abuse of Robots.Christoph Bartneck & Jun Hu - 2008 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 9 (3):415-433.
    Robots have been introduced into our society, but their social role is still unclear. A critical issue is whether the robot’s exhibition of intelligent behaviour leads to the users’ perception of the robot as being a social actor, similar to the way in which people treat computers and media as social actors. The first experiment mimicked Stanley Milgram’s obedience experiment, but on a robot. The participants were asked to administer electric shocks to a robot, and the results show that people (...)
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  5. More Human Than Human: Does The Uncanny Curve Really Matter?Diane Proudfoot, Jakub Zlotowski & Christoph Bartneck - 2013 - In Proceedings of the HRI2013 Workshop on Design of Humanlikeness in HRI: from uncanny valley to minimal design. pp. 7-13.
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  6.  45
    The Asymmetry Between Discoveries and Inventions in the Nobel Prize in Physics.Christoph Bartneck & Matthias Rauterberg - 2008 - Technoetic Arts 6 (1):73-77.
  7.  30
    Persistence of the Uncanny Valley: The Influence of Repeated Interactions and a Robot's Attitude on its Perception.Jakub A. Złotowski, Hidenobu Sumioka, Shuichi Nishio, Dylan F. Glas, Christoph Bartneck & Hiroshi Ishiguro - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  8.  4
    What’s to Bullying a Bot? : Correlates Between Chatbot Humanlikeness and Abuse.Merel Keijsers, Christoph Bartneck & Friederike Eyssel - 2021 - Interaction Studies 22 (1):55-80.
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  9. The Carrot and the Stick.Christoph Bartneck, Juliane Reichenbach & Julie Carpenter - 2008 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 9 (2):179-203.
    This paper presents two studies that investigate how people praise and punish robots in a collaborative game scenario. In a first study, subjects played a game together with humans, computers, and anthropomorphic and zoomorphic robots. The different partners and the game itself were presented on a computer screen. Results showed that praise and punishment were used the same way for computer and human partners. Yet robots, which are essentially computers with a different embodiment, were treated differently. Very machine-like robots were (...)
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  10.  13
    The Asymmetry Between Discoveries and Inventions in the Nobel Prize in Physics.Christoph Bartneck & Matthias Rauterberg - 2008 - Technoetic Arts 6 (1):73-77.
  11.  9
    The Carrot and the Stick: The Role of Praise and Punishment in Human–Robot Interaction.Christoph Bartneck, Juliane Reichenbach & Julie Carpenter - 2008 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 9 (2):179-203.
  12. Editorial to the Special Section on Misuse and Abuse of Interactive Technologies.Christoph Bartneck, Sheryl Brahnam, Antonella De Angeli & Catherine Pelachaud - 2008 - Interaction Studies 9 (3):397.
  13.  3
    The Carrot and the Stick The Role of Praise and Punishment in Humanrobot Interaction.Christoph Bartneck, Juliane Reichenbach & Julie Carpenter - 2008 - Interaction Studies 9 (2):179-203.