Results for 'Christopher A. Chung'

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  1.  57
    Design, development, and evaluation of an interactive simulator for engineering ethics education (seee).Christopher A. Chung & Michael Alfred - 2009 - Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (2):189-199.
    Societal pressures, accreditation organizations, and licensing agencies are emphasizing the importance of ethics in the engineering curriculum. Traditionally, this subject has been taught using dogma, heuristics, and case study approaches. Most recently a number of organizations have sought to increase the utility of these approaches by utilizing the Internet. Resources from these organizations include on-line courses and tests, videos, and DVDs. While these individual approaches provide a foundation on which to base engineering ethics, they may be limited in developing a (...)
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  2.  57
    Design, Development, and Evaluation of a Second Generation Interactive Simulator for Engineering Ethics Education (SEEE2).Michael Alfred & Christopher A. Chung - 2012 - Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (4):689-697.
    This paper describes a second generation Simulator for Engineering Ethics Education. Details describing the first generation activities of this overall effort are published in Chung and Alfred (Sci Eng Ethics 15:189–199, 2009). The second generation research effort represents a major development in the interactive simulator educational approach. As with the first generation effort, the simulator places students in first person perspective scenarios involving different types of ethical situations. Students must still gather data, assess the situation, and make decisions. The (...)
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  3.  36
    Comparison of Cross Culture Engineering Ethics Training Using the Simulator for Engineering Ethics Education.Christopher Chung - 2015 - Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (2):471-478.
    This paper describes the use and analysis of the Simulator for Engineering Ethics Education to perform cross culture engineering ethics training and analysis. Details describing the first generation and second generation development of the SEEE are published in Chung and Alfred, Science and Engineering Ethics, vol. 15, 2009 and Alfred and Chung, Science and Engineering Ethics, vol. 18, 2012. In this effort, a group of far eastern educated students operated the simulator in the instructional, training, scenario, and evaluation (...)
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  4. Emotion Regulation, Parasympathetic Function, and Psychological Well-Being.Ryan L. Brown, Michelle A. Chen, Jensine Paoletti, Eva E. Dicker, E. Lydia Wu-Chung, Angie S. LeRoy, Marzieh Majd, Robert Suchting, Julian F. Thayer & Christopher P. Fagundes - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    The negative emotions generated following stressful life events can increase one’s risk of depressive symptoms and promote higher levels of perceived stress. The process model of emotion regulation can help distinguish between adaptive and maladaptive emotion regulation strategies to determine who may be at the greatest risk of worse psychological health across the lifespan. Heart rate variability may affect these relationships as it indexes aspects of self-regulation, including emotion and behavioral regulation, that enable an individual to dynamically adapt to the (...)
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  5. Gauge principles, gauge arguments and the logic of nature.Christopher A. Martin - 2002 - Proceedings of the Philosophy of Science Association 2002 (3):S221-S234.
    I consider the question of how literally one can construe the “gauge argument,” which is the canonical means of understanding the putatively central import of local gauge symmetry principles for fundamental physics. As I argue, the gauge argument must be afforded a heuristic reading. Claims to the effect that the argument reflects a deep “logic of nature” must, for numerous reasons I discuss, be taken with a grain of salt.
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  6.  5
    Practicing mortality: art, philosophy, and contemplative seeing.Christopher A. Dustin - 2005 - New York: Palgrave-Macmillan. Edited by Joanna E. Ziegler.
    A collaborative undertaking between an artist and a philosopher, this monograph attempts to deepen our understanding of "contemplative seeing" by addressing the works of Plato, Thoreau, Heidegger, and more. The authors explore what it means to "see" reality and contemplate how viewing reality philosophically and artfully is a form of spirituality. In this way, by developing a new conception of active visual engagement, the authors propose a way of seeing that unites both critical scrutiny and spiritual involvement, as opposed to (...)
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  7. Types of testimony and their reliability.Christopher A. Torres - 2024 - Synthese 203 (6):1-27.
    It is a seemingly innocuous fact that people learn from the testimony of authorities. Children learn from parents, students learn from teachers, and laypeople learn from experts. What makes this appearance a little less innocent, however, is that some of these same people would have believed sources of testimony that are not authoritative, e.g., unreliable peers and charlatans. Since such hearers of testimony could form as many false beliefs as true ones, they appear to be unreliable consumers of testimony. Therefore, (...)
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  8.  21
    Out of Practice: Foreign Travel as the Productive Disruption of Embodied Knowledge Schemes.Christopher A. Howard - 2015 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 15 (1):1-12.
    This paper explores foreign travel as an affective experience, embodied practice and form of learning. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork on tourism and pilgrimage in the Himalayan region, the phenomenological notions of “home world” and “alien world” are employed to discuss how perceptions of strangeness and everyday practices are shaped by enculturation and socialisation processes. It is shown that travellers bring the habitus and doxa acquired in the home world to foreign situations, where these embodied knowledge schemes and abilities for skilful (...)
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  9. A Responsibility to Whom? Populism and Its Effects on Corporate Social Responsibility.Christopher A. Hartwell & Timothy M. Devinney - 2024 - Business and Society 63 (2):300-340.
    Although populism is an ideologically fluid political vehicle, it is not one that is intrinsically anti-business. Indeed, different varieties of populist parties may encourage business activity for utilitarian ends, but with their own ideas on what businesses should be doing. This reality implies that initiatives not related to national greatness or priorities as defined by the populist leadership may be viewed as redundant. Key among such initiatives would be corporate social responsibility (CSR). In a populist environment, it is possible that (...)
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  10.  75
    Why Hope is not a Moral Virtue: Aquinas's Insight.Christopher A. Bobier - 2018 - Ratio 31 (2):214-232.
    There is a growing consensus among philosophers that hope is a moral virtue: the virtuously hopeful person experiences the right amount of hope for the right things. This moralization of hope presents us with a puzzle. The historical consensus is that hope is a passion and hope is a theological virtue, not a moral virtue. Thomas Aquinas, the philosopher who wrote most extensively on hope, offers an explanation for why hope is not a moral virtue. The aim of this paper (...)
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  11.  61
    Gauge Principles, Gauge Arguments and the Logic of Nature.Christopher A. Martin - 2002 - Philosophy of Science 69 (S3):S221-S234.
    I consider the question of how literally one can construe the “gauge argument,” which is the canonical means of understanding the putatively central import of local gauge symmetry principles for fundamental physics. As I argue, the gauge argument must be afforded a heuristic reading. Claims to the effect that the argument reflects a deep “logic of nature” must, for numerous reasons I discuss, be taken with a grain of salt.
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  12.  98
    Segmentation in the perception and memory of events.Christopher A. Kurby & Jeffrey M. Zacks - 2008 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):72-79.
  13. Dilemma for appeals to the moral significance of birth.Christopher A. Bobier & Adam Omelianchuk - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics (12).
    Giubilini and Minerva argue that the permissibility of abortion entails the permissibility of infanticide. Proponents of what we refer to as the Birth Strategy claim that there is a morally significant difference brought about at birth that accounts for our strong intuition that killing newborns is morally impermissible. We argue that strategy does not account for the moral intuition that late-term, non-therapeutic abortions are morally impermissible. Advocates of the Birth Strategy must either judge non-therapeutic abortions as impermissible in the later (...)
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  14.  19
    Is medical aid in dying discriminatory?Christopher A. Riddle - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (2):122-122.
    In _Discrimination Against the Dying_, Philip Reed argues, among other things, that ‘right to die laws (euthanasia and assisted suicide) also exhibit terminalism when they restrict eligibility to the terminally ill’. 1 Additionally, he suggests ‘the availability of the option of assisted death only for the terminally ill negatively influences the terminally ill who wish to live by causing them to doubt their choice’. 1 I argue that on scrutiny, neither of these two points hold. First, we routinely limit a (...)
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  15.  46
    Why appeals to the moral significance of birth are saddled with a dilemma.Christopher A. Bobier & Adam Omelianchuk - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (7):490-491.
    In ‘Dilemma for Appeals to the Moral Significance of Birth’, we argued that a dilemma is faced by those who believe that birth is the event at which infanticide is ruled out. Those who reject the moral permissibility of infanticide by appeal to the moral significance of birth must either accept the moral permissibility of a late-term abortion for a non-therapeutic reason or not. If they accept it, they need to account for the strong intuition that her decision is wrong (...)
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  16.  71
    What Would the Virtuous Person Eat? The Case for Virtuous Omnivorism.Christopher A. Bobier - 2021 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 34 (3):1-19.
    Would the virtuous person eat animals? According to some ethicists, the answer is a resounding no, at least for the virtuous person living in an affluent society. The virtuous person cares about animal suffering, and so, she will not contribute to practices that involve animal suffering when she can easily adopt a strict plant-based diet. The virtuous person is temperate, and temperance involves not indulging in unhealthy diets, which include diets that incorporate animals. Moreover, it is unjust for an animal (...)
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  17.  1
    A Rule-Based Solution to Opaque Medical Billing in the U.S.Christopher A. Bobier - 2024 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 52 (1):22-30.
    Patients and physicians do not know the cost of medical procedures. Opaque medical billing thus contributes to exorbitant, rising medical costs, burdening the healthcare system and individuals. After criticizing two proposed solutions to the problem of opaque medical billing, I argue that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services should pursue a rule requiring that patients be informed by the physician of a reasonable out-of-pocket expense estimate for non-urgent procedures prior to services rendered.
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  18. A Quantum-Bayesian Route to Quantum-State Space.Christopher A. Fuchs & Rüdiger Schack - 2011 - Foundations of Physics 41 (3):345-356.
    In the quantum-Bayesian approach to quantum foundations, a quantum state is viewed as an expression of an agent’s personalist Bayesian degrees of belief, or probabilities, concerning the results of measurements. These probabilities obey the usual probability rules as required by Dutch-book coherence, but quantum mechanics imposes additional constraints upon them. In this paper, we explore the question of deriving the structure of quantum-state space from a set of assumptions in the spirit of quantum Bayesianism. The starting point is the representation (...)
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  19. Sacrificial pasts and messianic futures: Religion as a political prospect in René Girard and Giorgio Agamben.Christopher A. Fox - 2007 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (5):563-595.
    Religion has become a vital resource for attempts to rethink the meaning of the political. This article rehearses the efforts of two recent figures, René Girard and Giorgio Agamben, to transform the political by renewing its connection to religion. Both thinkers struggle to escape politics as defined by Carl Schmitt's friend/enemy distinction. Girard and Agamben do clash ideologically, but their inquiries into sacrifice and messianism take similar courses. Regarding origins, Girard argues for the sacrificial crisis as the common parent to (...)
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  20. Lexical Flexibility, Natural Language, and Ontology.Christopher A. Vogel - 2016 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 16 (1):1-44.
    The Realist that investigates questions of ontology by appeal to the quantificational structure of language assumes that the semantics for the privileged language of ontology is externalist. I argue that such a language cannot be (some variant of) a natural language, as some Realists propose. The flexibility exhibited by natural language expressions noted by Chomsky and others cannot obviously be characterized by the rigid models available to the externalist. If natural languages are hostile to externalist treatments, then the meanings of (...)
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  21.  46
    Orphans and the relational significance of birth: a response to Singh.Christopher A. Bobier - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (6):439-440.
    Prabhpal Singh has defended a relational account of the difference in moral status between fetuses and newborns. Newborns stand in the parent-child relation while fetuses do not, and standing in the parent-child relationship brings with it higher moral status for newborns. Orphans pose a problem for this account because they do not stand in a parent-child relationship. I argue that Singh has not satisfactorily responded to the problem.
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  22. Is a vegetarian diet morally safe?Christopher A. Bobier - forthcoming - Zeitschrift Für Ethik Und Moralphilosophie.
    If non-human animals have high moral status, then we commit a grave moral error by eating them. Eating animals is thus morally risky, while many agree that it is morally permissible to not eat animals. According to some philosophers, then, non-animal ethicists should err on the side of caution and refrain from eating animals. I argue that this precautionary argument assumes a false dichotomy of dietary options: a diet that includes farm-raised animals or a diet that does not include animals (...)
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  23. Bayesian conditioning, the reflection principle, and quantum decoherence.Christopher A. Fuchs & Rüdiger Schack - 2012 - In Yemima Ben-Menahem & Meir Hemmo (eds.), Probability in Physics. Springer. pp. 233--247.
    The probabilities a Bayesian agent assigns to a set of events typically change with time, for instance when the agent updates them in the light of new data. In this paper we address the question of how an agent's probabilities at different times are constrained by Dutch-book coherence. We review and attempt to clarify the argument that, although an agent is not forced by coherence to use the usual Bayesian conditioning rule to update his probabilities, coherence does require the agent's (...)
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  24.  89
    Hope and practical deliberation.Christopher A. Bobier - 2017 - Analysis 77 (3):495-497.
    Accounts of practical deliberation tend to overlook any possible role for hope. I offer an argument showing that hope sets the ends of our practical deliberations and is thereby necessary for practical deliberation. It is because I hope to summit the mountain by midday that I deliberate about how to do so. Absent this particular hope, I could not deliberate about how to summit the mountain by midday.
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  25.  76
    Defining disability: metaphysical not political.Christopher A. Riddle - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):377-384.
    Recent discussions surrounding the conceptualising of disability has resulted in a stalemate between British sociologists and philosophers. The stagnation of theorizing that has occurred threatens not only academic pursuits and the advancement of theoretical interpretations within the Disability Studies community, but also how we educate and advocate politically, legally, and socially. More pointedly, many activists and theorists in the UK appear to believe the British social model is the only effective means of understanding and advocating on behalf of people with (...)
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  26.  76
    Assisted Dying & Disability.Christopher A. Riddle - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (6):484-489.
    This article explores at least two dominant critiques of assisted dying from a disability rights perspective. In spite of these critiques, I conclude that assisted dying ought to be permissible. I arrive at the conclusion that if we respect and value people with disabilities, we ought to permit assisted dying. I do so in the following manner. First, I examine recent changes in legislation that have occurred since the Royal Society of Canada Expert Panel on End-of-Life Decision-Making report, published in (...)
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  27.  35
    Extending the Impairment Argument to Sentient Non-Human Animals.Christopher A. Bobier - 2022 - Between the Species 25 (1):1-24.
    This paper offers a new argument against raising and killing sentient non-human animals for food. It is immoral to non-lethally impair sentient non-human animals for pleasure, and since raising and killing sentient animals for gustatory pleasure impairs them to a much greater degree, it also is wrong. This is because of the impairment principle: if it is immoral to impair an organism to some degree, then, ceteris paribus, it is immoral to impair it to a higher degree. This argument is (...)
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  28.  37
    Those voices in your head: Activation of auditory images during reading.Christopher A. Kurby, Joseph P. Magliano & David N. Rapp - 2009 - Cognition 112 (3):457-461.
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  29.  11
    Assent and vulnerability in patients who lack capacity.Christopher A. Riddle - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (7):485-486.
    Smajdor’s Reification and Assent in Research Involving Those Who lack Capacity claims, among other things, that ‘adults who cannot give informed consent may nevertheless have the ability to assent and dissent, and that these capacities are morally important in the context of research’.1 More pointedly, she suggests we can rely upon Gillick competence, or that ‘it is worth thinking about why the same trajectory [as children] has not been evident in the context of [adults with impairments of capacity to give (...)
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  30.  21
    Bette Anton, MLS, is the Head Librarian of the Optometry Library/Health Sciences Information Service. This library serves the University of California at Berkeley–University of California at San Francisco Joint Medical Program and the University of California at Berkeley School of Optometry.Howard Brody, Michele A. Carter, Kevin C. Chung & Joshua Cohen - 2000 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9:305-307.
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  31. Double on Searle's chinese room.Christopher A. Fields - 1984 - Nature and System 6 (March):51-54.
     
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  32.  14
    Reconciling Contemporary Approaches to School Attendance and School Absenteeism: Toward Promotion and Nimble Response, Global Policy Review and Implementation, and Future Adaptability.Christopher A. Kearney, Carolina Gonzálvez, Patricia A. Graczyk & Mirae J. Fornander - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  33.  30
    Hipponax Fragment 128W: Epic Parody or Expulsive Incantation?Christopher A. Faraone - 2004 - Classical Antiquity 23 (2):209-245.
    Scholars have traditionally interpreted Hipponax fragment 128 as an epic parody designed to belittle the grand pretensions and gluttonous habits of his enemy. I suggest, however, that this traditional reading ultimately falls short because of two unexamined assumptions: that the meter and diction of the fragment are exclusively meant to recall epic narrative and not any other early hexametrical genre, and that the descriptive epithets in lines 2 and 3 are the ad hoc comic creations of the poet and simply (...)
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  34.  7
    Human Rights, Disability, and Capabilities.Christopher A. Riddle - 2016 - New York, NY, USA: Palgrave Macmillan.
    This book presents the argument that health has special moral importance because of the disadvantage one suffers when subjected to impairment or disabling barriers. Christopher A. Riddle asserts that ill health and the presence of disabling barriers are human rights issues and that we require a foundational conception of justice in order to promote the rights of people with disabilities. The claim that disability is a human rights issue is defended on the grounds that people with disabilities experience violations (...)
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  35.  53
    Responsibility and Foundational Material Conditions.Christopher A. Riddle - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (7):53 - 55.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 7, Page 53-55, July 2011.
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  36.  25
    Melinda A. Roberts , Abortion and the Moral Significance of Merely Possible Persons: Finding Middle Ground in Hard Cases . Reviewed by.Christopher A. Pynes - 2012 - Philosophy in Review 32 (3):225-227.
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  37.  18
    Using Cognitive Agents to Train Negotiation Skills.Christopher A. Stevens, Jeroen Daamen, Emma Gaudrain, Tom Renkema, Jakob Dirk Top, Fokie Cnossen & Niels A. Taatgen - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  38.  41
    Thomas Reid and the problem of secondary qualities.Christopher A. Shrock - 2013 - Dissertation, Baylor University
    Direct Realism is the view that human perception takes physical entities and their mind-independent properties as immediate objects. Although this thesis is supported by common sense, many argue that it can be dismissed on philosophical or quasi-scientific grounds. This essay attempts to defend Direct Realism against one such argument, which I call the “Problem of Secondary Qualities,” using the ideas of Scottish Common Sense philosopher Thomas Reid. The first chapter of this work offers a detailed introduction to the Problem of (...)
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  39.  37
    The Uses and Abuses of Legitimacy in International Law.Christopher A. Thomas - 2014 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 34 (4):729-758.
    In recent decades, the term ‘ legitimacy ’ has featured heavily in debates about international law and international institutions. Yet the concept of legitimacy, mercurial as it is, has remained under-scrutinized, leading to confusion and misuse. Rather than advancing a particular conception of what may make international law legitimate, this article seeks to clarify and complicate how international lawyers understand and use legitimacy as a concept. To begin, the article distinguishes between legal, moral and social legitimacy. It highlights the different (...)
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  40.  37
    Religious Reasons in the Public Square.Christopher A. Callaway - 2010 - Social Theory and Practice 36 (4):621-641.
    This essay surveys some of the problems facing theories of public deliberation that are “exclusivist” insofar as they account for good participation in terms of a citizen’s refusal to use certain kinds of reasons. It then argues for a more promising alternative: one that focuses on citizens’ character rather than the content of their reasons. More specifically, it is possible to distinguish good participation from bad by considering the extent to which the citizen possesses and demonstrates the virtue of reasonableness. (...)
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  41.  10
    Reconciling Contemporary Approaches to School Attendance and School Absenteeism: Toward Promotion and Nimble Response, Global Policy Review and Implementation, and Future Adaptability (Part 2).Christopher A. Kearney, Carolina Gonzálvez, Patricia A. Graczyk & Mirae J. Fornander - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    As noted in Part 1 of this two-part review, school attendance is an important foundational competency for children and adolescents, and school absenteeism has been linked to myriad short- and long-term negative consequences, even into adulthood. Categorical and dimensional approaches for this population have been developed. This article (Part 2 of a two-part review) discusses compatibilities of categorical and dimensional approaches for school attendance and school absenteeism and how these approaches can inform one another. The article also poses a multidimensional (...)
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  42. Why is there a stem cell debate? And how to depoliticize it.Christopher A. Pynes - 2007 - In Mohan Matthen & Christopher Stephens (eds.), Philosophy of Biology. Elsevier. pp. 144--425.
     
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  43.  72
    Thomas Aquinas on the Basis of the Irascible-Concupiscible Division.Christopher A. Bobier - 2020 - Res Philosophica 97 (1):31-52.
    Thomas Aquinas divides the sensory appetite into two powers: the irascible and the concupiscible. The irascible power moves creatures toward arduous goods and away from arduous evils, while the concupiscible power moves creatures toward pleasant goods and away from non-arduous evils. Despite the importance of this distinction, it remains unclear what counts as an arduous good or evil, and why arduousness is the defining feature of the division. The aim of this paper is twofold. First, I argue that an arduous (...)
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  44.  15
    Disability and Justice: The Capabilities Approach in Practice.Christopher A. Riddle & Jerome E. Bickenbach - 2014 - Lexington Books.
    Disability & Justice: The Capabilities Approach in Practice is an interdisciplinary examination of the practical application of the capabilities approach viewed through the lens of the experience of disability. Careful and critical examination of vital foundational concepts is undertaken prior to contextualizing the experience of disability and how we might begin to promote an inclusive society through an application of the capabilities approach.
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  45. The Usury Prohibition and Natural Law: A Reappraisal.Christopher A. Franks - 2008 - The Thomist 72 (4):625-660.
     
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  46. Yellow is not a Color.Christopher A. Shrock - 2012 - Southwest Philosophical Studies 34:58-64.
  47.  26
    John Corvino and Maggie Gallagher , Debating Same-Sex Marriage . Reviewed by.Christopher A. Callaway - 2014 - Philosophy in Review 34 (1-2):4-6.
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  48.  29
    Jason F. Brennan, Why Not Capitalism?. Reviewed by.Christopher A. Callaway - 2016 - Philosophy in Review 36 (4):144-146.
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  49.  6
    Inscribed Greek Thunderstones as House- and Body-Amulets in Roman Imperial Times.Christopher A. Faraone - 2014 - Kernos 27:257-284.
    La réutilisation des haches néolithiques (également appelées « celts » ou « pierres de foudre ») comme des amulettes à l’époque romaine est aujourd’hui sous-estimée. En conséquence, la date ancienne des deux petits exemples inscrits du British Museum (BM nos 1* et 504) est maintenant remise en doute, en raison d’une évaluation négative qui découle de l’utilisation insuffisante de comparanda. En comparaison avec le corpus croissant de pierres magiques, les médias de ces deux petites haches (jadéite ou serpentine), leur poli (...)
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  50.  39
    Magical and Medical Approaches to the Wandering Womb in the Ancient Greek World.Christopher A. Faraone - 2011 - Classical Antiquity 30 (1):1-32.
    The idea that the womb moved freely about a woman's body causing spasmodic disease enjoyed great popularity among the ancient Greeks, beginning in the classical period with Plato and the Hippocratic writers and continuing on into the Roman and Byzantine periods. Armed with sophisticated analyses of the medical tradition and new texts pertaining to the magical, this essay describes how both approaches to the wandering womb develop side by side in mutual influence from the late classical period onwards. Of special (...)
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