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  1.  10
    Moral Origins: The Evolution of Virtue, Altruism, and Shame.Christopher Boehm - 2010 - Basic Books.
    Darwin's inner voice -- Living the virtuous life -- Of altruism and free riders -- Knowing our immediate predecessors -- Resurrecting some venerable ancestors -- A natural Garden of Eden -- The positive side of social selection -- Learning morals across the generations -- Work of the moral majority -- Pleistocene ups, downs, and crashes -- Testing the selection-by-reputation hypothesis -- The evolution of morals -- Epilogue: humanity's moral future.
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  2.  43
    Conflict and the Evolution of Social Control.Christopher Boehm - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (1-2):1-2.
    With an interest in origins, it is proposed that conflict within the group can be taken as a natural focus for exploring the evolutionary development of human moral communities. Morality today involves social control but also the management of conflicts within the group. It is hypothesized that early manifestations of morality involved the identification and collective suppression of behaviours likely to cause such conflict. By triangulation the mutual ancestor of humans and the two Pan species lived in pronounced social dominance (...)
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  3.  58
    The Natural Selection of Altruistic Traits.Christopher Boehm - 1999 - Human Nature 10 (3):205-252.
    Proponents of the standard evolutionary biology paradigm explain human “altruism” in terms of either nepotism or strict reciprocity. On that basis our underlying nature is reduced to a function of inclusive fitness: human nature has to be totally selfish or nepotistic. Proposed here are three possible paths to giving costly aid to nonrelatives, paths that are controversial because they involve assumed pleiotropic effects or group selection. One path is pleiotropic subsidies that help to extend nepotistic helping behavior from close family (...)
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  4.  33
    Costs and Benefits in Hunter-Gatherer Punishment.Christopher Boehm - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (1):19-20.
    Hunter-gatherer punishment involves costs and benefits to individuals and groups, but the costs do not necessarily fit with the assumptions made in models that consider punishment to be altruistic – which brings in the free-rider problem and the problem of second-order free-riders. In this commentary, I present foragers' capital punishment patterns ethnographically, in the interest of establishing whether such punishment is likely to be costly; and I suggest that in many cases abstentions from punishment that might be taken as defections (...)
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  5.  20
    Collective Intentionality: A Basic and Early Component of Moral Evolution.Christopher Boehm - 2018 - Philosophical Psychology 31 (5):680-702.
  6. A Short History of Altruism and Health.Christopher Boehm & D. Ph - 2007 - In Stephen G. Post (ed.), Altruism and Health: Perspectives From Empirical Research. Oup Usa.
     
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  7. Modeling Our Human Ancestor.Christopher Boehm - 2007 - In Stephen G. Post (ed.), Altruism and Health: Perspectives From Empirical Research. Oup Usa. pp. 332.
     
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  8. Execution Within the Clan as an Extreme Form of Ostracism.Christopher Boehm - 1985 - Social Science Information 24 (2):309-321.
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  9.  11
    Group Selection in the Upper Palaeolithic.Christopher Boehm - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (1-2):1-2.
    Using criteria of relative plausibility, it is possible to make a case for significant group selection over the 100,000 years that Anatomically Modern Humans have been both moral and egalitarian. Our nomadic forebears surely lived in egalitarian communities that levelled social differences and moralistically curbed free-riding behaviour, and this egalitarian syndrome would have had profound effects on levels of selection. First, it reduced phenotypic variation at the within-group level. Second, it increased phenotypic variation at the between-group level. Third, and crucially, (...)
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  10.  20
    The Origin of Morality as Social Control.Christopher Boehm - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (1-2):149-184.
  11.  7
    Explaining the Prosocial Side of Moral Communities.Christopher Boehm - 2004 - In Phillip Clayton & Jeffrey Schloss (eds.), Evolution and Ethics: Human Morality in Biological and Religious Perspective. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.. pp. 78--100.
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