10 found
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  1.  9
    Bioethics and the Myth of Neutrality.Angus Dawson, Christopher F. C. Jordens, Paul Macneill & Deborah Zion - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (4):483-486.
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  2.  30
    Contextualising Professional Ethics: The Impact of the Prison Context on the Practices and Norms of Health Care Practitioners.Karolyn L. A. White, Christopher F. C. Jordens & Ian Kerridge - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (3):333-345.
    Health care is provided in many contexts—not just hospitals, clinics, and community health settings. Different institutional settings may significantly influence the design and delivery of health care and the ethical obligations and practices of health care practitioners working within them. This is particularly true in institutions that are established to constrain freedom, ensure security and authority, and restrict movement and choice. We describe the results of a qualitative study of the experiences of doctors and nurses working within two women’s prisons (...)
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  3. “Good Mothering” or “Good Citizenship”?Maree Porter, Ian H. Kerridge & Christopher F. C. Jordens - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (1):41-47.
    Umbilical cord blood banking is one of many biomedical innovations that confront pregnant women with new choices about what they should do to secure their own and their child’s best interests. Many mothers can now choose to donate their baby’s umbilical cord blood (UCB) to a public cord blood bank or pay to store it in a private cord blood bank. Donation to a public bank is widely regarded as an altruistic act of civic responsibility. Paying to store UCB may (...)
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  4.  19
    Health Journalists' Perceptions of Their Professional Roles and Responsibilities for Ensuring the Veracity of Reports of Health Research.Rowena Forsyth, Bronwen Morrell, Wendy Lipworth, Ian Kerridge, Christopher F. C. Jordens & Simon Chapman - 2012 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 27 (2):130 - 141.
    Health industries attempt to influence the public through the news media and through their relationships with expert academics and opinion leaders. This study reports journalists' perceptions of their professional roles and responsibilities regarding the relationships between industry and academia and research results. Journalists believe that responsibility for the scientific validity of their reports rests with academics and systems of peer review. However, this approach fails to account for the extent of industry-academy interactions and the flaws of peer review. Health journalists' (...)
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  5.  22
    Introduction to J.R. Martin’s “Negotiating Values: Narrative and Exposition”. [REVIEW]Christopher F. C. Jordens - 2008 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (1):39-40.
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  6.  23
    Power and Control in Interactions Between Journalists and Health-Related Industries: The View From Industry.Bronwen Morrell, Wendy L. Lipworth, Rowena Forsyth, Christopher F. C. Jordens & Ian Kerridge - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):233-244.
    The mass media is a major source of health information for the public, and as such the quality and independence of health news reporting is an important concern. Concerns have been expressed that journalists reporting on health are increasingly dependent on their sources—including representatives of industries responsible for manufacturing health-related products—for story ideas and content. Many critics perceive an imbalance of power between journalists and industry sources, with industry being in a position of relative power, however the empirical evidence to (...)
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  7.  31
    Direct-to-Consumer Personal Genome Testing: The Problem Is Not Ignorance–It Is Market Failure.Christopher F. C. Jordens, Ian H. Kerridge & Gabrielle N. Samuel - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (6-7):13-15.
  8.  27
    Paul Komesaroff. 2008. Experiments in Love and Death: Medicine, Postmodernism, Microethics and the Body. [REVIEW]Christopher F. C. Jordens - 2010 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (1):125-127.
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  9.  15
    Trouble in the Gap: A Bioethical and Sociological Analysis of Informed Consent for High-Risk Medical Procedures. [REVIEW]Christopher F. C. Jordens, Kathleen Montgomery & Rowena Forsyth - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (1):67-77.
    Concerns are frequently raised about the extent to which formal consent procedures actually lead to “informed” consent. As part of a study of consent to high-risk medical procedures, we analyzed in-depth interviews with 16 health care professionals working in bone-marrow transplantation in Sydney, Australia. We find that these professionals recognize and act on their responsibility to inform and educate patients and that they expect patients to reciprocate these efforts by demonstrably engaging in the education process. This expectation is largely implicit, (...)
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  10.  18
    Face, Honor and Dignity in the Context of Colon Cancer.Miles Little, Christopher F. C. Jordens, Kim Paul, Emma Sayers & Dhananjayan Sriskandarajah - 2000 - Journal of Medical Humanities 21 (4):229-243.
    Illness narratives from patients with colorectal cancer commonly record patterns of change in social relationships that follow the diagnosis and treatment of the condition. We believe that these changes are best explained as a process of facework, which reflects losses of face on the part of the patient, and which assists in the creation of new faces that convey new senses of identity. Facework is familiar in the work by E. Goffman (1955) and has been extensively reworked since his time. (...)
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