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Christopher Griffin
Northern Arizona University
  1.  76
    Democracy as a Non–Instrumentally Just Procedure.Christopher G. Griffin - 2003 - Journal of Political Philosophy 11 (1):111–121.
  2.  83
    Disability-Selective Abortion and the Americans with Disabilities Act.Christopher L. Griffin Jr & Dov Fox - unknown
    This Article examines the influence of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) on affective attitudes toward children with disabilities and on the incidence of disability-selective abortion. Applying regression analysis to U.S. natality data, we find that the birthrate of children with Down syndrome declined significantly in the years following the ADA's passage. Controlling for technological, demographic, and cultural variables suggests that the ADA may have encouraged prospective parents to prevent the existence of the very class of people the Act was (...)
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  3.  13
    A Cellular Automata Model Can Quickly Approximate UDP and TCP Network Traffic.Richard R. Brooks, Christopher Griffin & T. Alan Payne - 2004 - Complexity 9 (3):32-40.
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  4. An Egalitarian Case Against Executive Privilege.Christopher Griffin - 2003 - Journal of Information Ethics 12 (1):34-44.
     
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  5.  2
    Immunising Birthsex: Ontology's Place in the Pandemic.Christopher Griffin - 2020 - Derrida Today 13 (2):159-164.
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  6.  32
    The Concept of Moral Obligation Michael J. Zimmerman Cambridge Studies in Philosophy New York: Cambridge University Press, 1996, Xiv + 301 Pp., $54.95. [REVIEW]Christopher G. Griffin - 1998 - Dialogue 37 (4):805-.
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  7. The Concept of Moral Obligation. [REVIEW]Christopher G. Griffin - 1998 - Dialogue 37 (4):805-806.
    How are we to understand the claim that, morally speaking, one ought to do the best one can? We must, of course, refer at some point to a substantive moral theory to flesh out the evaluative term “best,” and much of moral philosophy is devoted to defending one or another such theory. But Michael Zimmerman proposes that moral theorizing may be usefully served by a prior and separate metaethical enterprise—viz., a formal analysis of the concept of moral obligation. This analysis (...)
     
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