Results for 'Christopher Groening'

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  1.  19
    Investor Reactions to Concurrent Positive and Negative Stakeholder News.Christopher Groening & Vamsi K. Kanuri - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 149 (4):833-856.
    This paper examines the impact on firm value created by investor reaction to same day news of corporate social responsibility and corporate social irresponsibility activities. First, using trading volume, the authors establish that the perceived value of moral capital generated by news involving institutional stakeholders is less clear to investors than that of the news involving technical stakeholders. Subsequently, the authors analyze abnormal returns from 565 unique firm events—each comprising at least one positive and one negative stakeholder news item. Using (...)
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  2.  8
    Spiegelungen der Gleichheit: politische Philosophie nach Adorno und Derrida.Christoph Menke - 2004 - Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp.
  3. Philosophical post-anthropology for the Chthulucene: Levinasian and feminist new materialist perspectives in more-than-human crisis times.Amarantha Groen & Evelien Geerts - 2020 - Internationales Jahrbuch für Philosophische Anthropologie 10 (1):195-214.
    Finishing this essay exactly one year after the official arrival of the SARS-COV-2 virus in Belgium and the Netherlands—where the cartographers of this essay are currently located—it is safe to say that the COVID-19 pandemic has immensely impacted our day-to-day lives. The pandemic has not only forced us to question various taken-for-granted existential certainties and luxuries provided by a capitalist system out to destroy the earth but has also re-spotlighted post-Enlightenment critiques of the human subject. If these pandemic times are (...)
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  4. Temporal actualism and singular foreknowledge.Christopher Menzel - 1991 - Philosophical Perspectives 5:475-507.
    Suppose we believe that God created the world. Then surely we want it to be the case that he intended, in some sense at least, to create THIS world. Moreover, most theists want to hold that God didn't just guess or hope that the world would take one course or another; rather, he KNEW precisely what was going to take place in the world he planned to create. In particular, of each person P, God knew that P was to exist. (...)
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  5.  19
    Left is for language? Evidence for reduced cerebral lateralization in adolescents with Down syndrome.Groen Margriet, Badcock Nicholas & Bishop Dorothy - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  6.  11
    Human Beings and Their Education from an Anthropological Perspective: Current Discourses in the Field of Educational Science in the German‐Speaking World.Christoph Wulf - 2024 - Educational Theory 74 (2):245-254.
    In this article Cristoph Wulf examines the basic concepts of pedagogy and educational science in the German-speaking world, looking at education and socialization from the perspective of educational anthropology. He makes evident that the complex German concept of Bildung, in particular, can only be fully understood by means of a historical and philosophical analysis.
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  7.  11
    Import Penetration and Corporate Misconduct: A Natural Experiment.Christopher Dupuis & Ying Zheng - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-32.
    Corporate misconduct receives significant attention in the business ethics literature. This paper studies how corporate misconduct is impacted by import penetration from China, which is largely exogenous to the U.S. product market. Using this natural experiment, we find that heightened Chinese import penetration curbs corporate misconduct of U.S. firms. The effect is more pronounced for firms with weaker corporate governance and firms more vulnerable to product market competition. The findings provide implications for firms facing increased import penetration. Firms may consider (...)
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  8.  77
    Peirce.Christopher Hookway - 1985 - New York: Routledge. Edited by Ted Honderich.
    This book is available either individually, or as part of the specially-priced Arguments of the Philosphers Collection.
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  9.  9
    Realm of Reason.Christopher Peacocke - 2003 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press UK.
    The Realm of Reason develops a new, general theory of what it is for a thinker to be entitled to form a given belief. The theory locates entitlement in the nexus of relations between truth, content, and understanding. Peacocke formulates three principles of rationalism that articulate this conception. The principles imply that all entitlement has a component that is justificationally independent of experience. The resulting position is thus a form of rationalism, generalized to all kinds of content.To show how these (...)
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  10.  10
    Anthropologie: Geschichte, Kultur, Philosophie.Christoph Wulf - 2004 - Reinbek: Rowohlt Taschenbuch Verlag.
  11.  13
    Care, uncertainty and intergenerational ethics.Christopher Groves - 2014 - Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave-Macmillan.
    In an age where issues like climate change and the unintended consequences of technological innovation are high on the ethical and political agenda, questions about the nature and extent of our responsibilities to future generations have never been more important, yet simultaneously so difficult to answer. This book takes a unique approach to the problem by drawing on diverse traditions of thinking about care (including developmental psychology, phenomenology and feminist ethics) to explore the nature and meaning of our relationship with (...)
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  12.  12
    Order in Multiplicity: Homonymy in the Philosophy of Aristotle.Christopher John Shields - 1998 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press UK.
    Aristotle attaches particular significance to the homonymy of many central concepts in philosophy and science: that is, to the diversity of ways of being common to a single general concept. His preoccupation with homonymy influences his approach to almost every subject that he considers, and it clearly structures the philosophical methodology that he employs both when criticizing others and when advancing his own positive theories. Where there is homonymy there is multiplicity: Aristotle aims to find the order within this multiplicity, (...)
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  13.  61
    Does Kenny G play bad jazz? : A case study.Christopher Washburne - 2004 - In Christopher Washburne & Maiken Derno (eds.), Bad music: the music we love to hate. New York: Routledge. pp. 123.
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  14. Trivial music (trivialmusik) : "Preface" and "trivial music and aesthetic judgment".Christopher Washburne & Maiken Derno - 2004 - In Christopher Washburne & Maiken Derno (eds.), Bad music: the music we love to hate. New York: Routledge.
     
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  15.  18
    Caesar, Lucretius and the Dates of De Rerum Natura_ and the _Commentarii.Christopher B. Krebs - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (2):772-779.
    In February 54b.c. Cicero concludes a missive to his brother with a passing and – for us – tantalizing remark:Lucreti poemata ut scribis ita sunt, multis luminibus ingeni, multae tamen artis. sed cum veneris. virum te putabo si Sallusti Empedoclea legeris; hominem non putabo. Quintus had, it seems, readDe rerum natura, or at least parts thereof, just before he left Rome for an undisclosed location nearby, and he shared his enthusiasm with his brotherper codicillos. Meanwhile, he was corresponding with Julius (...)
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  16.  62
    A chronometric analysis of simple addition.Guy J. Groen & John M. Parkman - 1972 - Psychological Review 79 (4):329-343.
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  17. The expressive dimension.Christopher Potts - 2007 - Theoretical Linguistics 33 (2):165-198.
    Expressives like damn and bastard have, when uttered, an immediate and powerful impact on the context. They are performative, often destructively so. They are revealing of the perspective from which the utterance is made, and they can have a dramatic impact on how current and future utterances are perceived. This, despite the fact that speakers are invariably hard-pressed to articulate what they mean. I develop a general theory of these volatile, indispensable meanings. The theory is built around a class of (...)
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  18. Moral and Semantic Innocence.Christopher Hom & Robert May - 2013 - Analytic Philosophy 54 (3):293-313.
  19. Moral dilemmas.Christopher W. Gowans (ed.) - 1987 - New York: Oxford Uiversity Press.
    The essays in this volume illuminate a central topic in ethical theory: moral dilemmas. Some contemporary philosophers dispute the traditional view that a true moral dilemma -- a situation in which a person has two irreconcilable moral duties -- cannot exist. This collection provides the historical background to the ongoing debate with selections from Kant, Mill, Bradley, and Ross. The best recent work on the question is represented in essays by Donagan, Foot, Hare, Marcus, Nagel, van Fraassen, Williams, and others.
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  20. Pejoratives.Christopher Hom - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (2):164-185.
    The norms surrounding pejorative language, such as racial slurs and swear words, are deeply prohibitive. Pejoratives are typically a means for speakers to express their derogatory attitudes. As these attitudes vary along many dimensions and magnitudes, they initially appear to be resistant to a truth-conditional, semantic analysis. The goal of the paper is to clarify the essential linguistic phenomena surrounding pejoratives, survey the logical space of explanatory theories, evaluate each with respect to the phenomena and provide a preliminary assessment of (...)
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  21.  6
    Leerintentionen und leere Namen: eine semantische Untersuchung zur Phänomenologie Husserls.Christoph Staub - 2003 - Sankt Augustin: Academia Verlag.
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  22.  31
    Macht und Widerstand. Zwischen Nietzsche, Freud und Foucault.Christoph Türcke - 2011 - In Volker Caysa & Konstanze Schwarzwald (eds.), Nietzsche - macht - größe. Nietzsche - philosoph der größe der macht oder der macht der größe? deGruyter. pp. 89-100.
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  23.  29
    Evidence for semantic analysis of unattended verbal items.Marilyn C. Smith & Mary Groen - 1974 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (4):595.
  24. Presupposition and implicature.Christopher Potts - 1996 - In Shalom Lappin & Chris Fox (eds.), Handbook of Contemporary Semantic Theory. Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  25. Between instrumentalism and brain-writing.Christopher Peacocke - 1983 - In Sense and Content. Oxford University Press.
     
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  26.  60
    Derrida.Christopher Norris - 1987 - Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
    Discusses Derrida's writings on Plato, Kant, Hegel, Rousseau, Nietzsche, and Freud.
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  27. Fallacies and Argument Appraisal.Christopher W. Tindale - 2007 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Fallacies and Argument Appraisal presents an introduction to the nature, identification, and causes of fallacious reasoning, along with key questions for evaluation. Drawing from the latest work on fallacies as well as some of the standard ideas that have remained relevant since Aristotle, Christopher Tindale investigates central cases of major fallacies in order to understand what has gone wrong and how this has occurred. Dispensing with the approach that simply assigns labels and brief descriptions of fallacies, Tindale provides fuller (...)
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  28.  10
    Artificial Wombs: Could They Deliver an Answer to the Problem of Frozen Embryos?Christopher Gross - forthcoming - Christian Bioethics.
    Catholic thinkers generally agree that artificial womb technology (AWT) would be permissible in cases of partial ectogenesis to assist severely premature infants, but there is substantially more debate concerning whether AWT could be used to save frozen embryos, which are the result of in vitro fertilization (IVF). In many cases, these embryos have been abandoned and left in a permanently cryogenic state, which is an affront to their human dignity. While AWT would allow people to adopt these embryos and give (...)
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  29.  92
    Plato and the art of philosophical writing.Christopher Rowe - 2007 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Plato's dialogues are usually understood as simple examples of philosophy in action. In this book Professor Rowe treats them rather as literary-philosophical artefacts, shaped by Plato's desire to persuade his readers to exchange their view of life and the universe for a different view which, from their present perspective, they will barely begin to comprehend. What emerges is a radically new Plato: a Socratic throughout, who even in the late dialogues is still essentially the Plato (and the Socrates) of the (...)
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  30.  17
    Three Temples in Libanius and the Theodosian Code.Christopher P. Jones - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (2):860-865.
    In Libanius' speechFor the Temples(Or. 30), sometimes regarded as the crowning work of his career, he refers to an unnamed city in which a great pagan temple had recently been destroyed; the date of the speech is disputed, but must be in the 380 s or early 390 s, near the end of the speaker's life. After deploring the actions of a governor appointed by Theodosius, often identified with the praetorian prefect Maternus Cynegius, Libanius continues (30.44–5):Let no-one think that all (...)
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  31. Degrees of belief.Franz Huber & Christoph Schmidt-Petri (eds.) - 2009 - London: Springer.
    Various theories try to give accounts of how measures of this confidence do or ought to behave, both as far as the internal mental consistency of the agent as ...
  32. Ramsey eliminability and the testability of scientific theories.Herbert A. Simon & Guy J. Groen - 1973 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 24 (4):367-380.
  33. Some Varieties of Epistemic Injustice: Reflections on Fricker.Christopher Hookway - 2010 - Episteme 7 (2):151-163.
    Miranda Fricker's important study of epistemic injustice is focussed primarily on testimonial injustice and hermeneutic injustice. It explores how agents' capacities to make assertions and provide testimony can be impaired in ways that can involve forms of distinctively epistemic injustice. My paper identifies a wider range of forms of epistemic injustice that do not all involve the ability to make assertions or offer testimony. The paper considers some examples of some other ways in which injustice can prevent someone from participating (...)
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  34. Ambassadors of the game: do famous athletes have special obligations to act virtuously?Christopher C. Yorke & Alfred Archer - 2020 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 47 (2):301-317.
    Do famous athletes have special obligations to act virtuously? A number of philosophers have investigated this question by examining whether famous athletes are subject to special role model obligations (Wellman 2003; Feezel 2005; Spurgin 2012). In this paper we will take a different approach and give a positive response to this question by arguing for the position that sport and gaming celebrities are ‘ambassadors of the game’: moral agents whose vocations as rule-followers have unique implications for their non-lusory lives. According (...)
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  35. Actualism.Christopher Menzel - 2014 - In Edward N. Zalta (ed.), The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Stanford, CA: The Metaphysics Research Lab.
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  36.  5
    The kids' guide to sports ethics.Christopher Forest - 2014 - North Mankato, Minnesota: Capstone Press.
    Explores the topic of ethics in sports, including stories of good sportsmanship in action, playing by the rules, and game preparation.
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  37.  4
    Die Arbeit der Wissenschaften.Christoph Hoffmann - 2013 - Zürich: Diaphanes.
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  38. The Development of Schopenhauer's Philosophy.Christopher Janaway - 1989 - In Self and world in Schopenhauer's philosophy. New York: Oxford University Press.
    Schopenhauer's philosophy was formed during the years 1810–18. This chapter looks at the influences that shaped it, principally Kant, but also Plato, and the Upanishads. Schopenhauer aimed at a synthesis of these influences. Although indebted to Kant for the framework of his thought, he developed a conception of metaphysics and a ‘better consciousness’ of objective reality that would be free from the limitations imposed by Kant. Schopenhauer's antagonistic relationship with Fichte, Schelling, and Hegel is also mentioned.
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  39.  5
    Skepsis, Wahrheit, Illumination.Christoph Kann - 2001 - In Jan A. Aertsen, Kent Emery & Andreas Speer (eds.), Nach der Verurteilung von 1277 / After the Condemnation of 1277: Philosophie und Theologie an der Universität von Paris im letzten Viertel des 13. Jahrhunderts. Studien und Texte / Philosophy and Theology at the University of Paris in the Last Quarter of. De Gruyter. pp. 38-58.
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  40. Bad music: the music we love to hate.Christopher Washburne & Maiken Derno (eds.) - 2004 - New York: Routledge.
    Why are some popular musical forms and performers universally reviled by critics and ignored by scholars-despite enjoying large-scale popularity? How has the notion of what makes "good" or "bad" music changed over the years-and what does this tell us about the writers who have assigned these tags to different musical genres? Many composers that are today part of the classical "canon" were greeted initially by bad reviews. Similarly, jazz, country, and pop musics were all once rejected as "bad" by the (...)
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  41. Refugees and the Right to Control Immigration.Christopher Heath Wellman - 2021 - In Russ Shafer Landau (ed.), The Ethical Life: Fundamental Readings in Ethics and Moral Problems. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 286-300.
  42.  40
    Atomism in late medieval philosophy and theology.Christophe Grellard & Aurélien Robert (eds.) - 2009 - Boston: Brill.
    DMet 10: Prime matter is the origin of all quantities. Hence it is the origin of every dimension of continuous quantity whatever. ...
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  43.  37
    Frege's hierarchy: a puzzle.Christopher Peacocke - 2010 - In Joseph Almog & Paolo Leonardi (eds.), The philosophy of David Kaplan. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 159.
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  44. Mental action and self-awareness : epistemology.Christopher Peacocke - 2009 - In Lucy O'Brien & Matthew Soteriou (eds.), Mental actions. New York: Oxford University Press.
    We often know what we are judging, what we are deciding, what problem we are trying to solve. We know not only the contents of our judgements, decidings and tryings; we also know that it is judgement, decision and attempted problem-solving in which we are engaged. How do we know these things?
     
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  45.  19
    Is medical aid in dying discriminatory?Christopher A. Riddle - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (2):122-122.
    In _Discrimination Against the Dying_, Philip Reed argues, among other things, that ‘right to die laws (euthanasia and assisted suicide) also exhibit terminalism when they restrict eligibility to the terminally ill’. 1 Additionally, he suggests ‘the availability of the option of assisted death only for the terminally ill negatively influences the terminally ill who wish to live by causing them to doubt their choice’. 1 I argue that on scrutiny, neither of these two points hold. First, we routinely limit a (...)
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  46. On the view that we cannot perceive movement and change: Lessons from Locke and Reid.Christoph Hoerl - 2017 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 24 (3-4):88-102.
    According to the snapshot view of temporal experience, instances of movement and change cannot, strictly speaking, be objects of sensory perception. Perceptual consciousness instead consists of a succession of individual momentary experiences, none of which is itself an experience of movement or change. The snapshot view is often presented as an intuitively appealing view of the nature of temporal experience, even by philosophers who ultimately reject it. Yet, it is puzzling how this can be so, given that its central claim (...)
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  47. Attention and consciousness.Christopher Mole - 2008 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (4):86-104.
    According to commonsense psychology, one is conscious of everything that one pays attention to, but one does not pay attention to all the things that one is conscious of. Recent lines of research purport to show that commonsense is mistaken on both of these points: Mack and Rock (1998) tell us that attention is necessary for consciousness, while Kentridge and Heywood (2001) claim that consciousness is not necessary for attention. If these lines of research were successful they would have important (...)
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  48.  78
    Truth, rationality, and pragmatism: themes from Peirce.Christopher Hookway (ed.) - 2000 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Christopher Hookway presents a series of studies of themes from the work of the great American philosopher and pragmatist, Charles S. Peirce (1839-1913). These themes center on the question of how we are to investigate the world rationally. Hookway shows how Peirce's ideas about this continue to play an important role in contemporary philosophy.
  49. Introduction. The Debate on Moral Dilemmas.Christopher Gowans - 1987 - In Christopher W. Gowans (ed.), Moral dilemmas. New York: Oxford Uiversity Press. pp. 3--33.
     
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  50.  78
    Jung and the postmodern: the interpretation of realities.Christopher Hauke - 2000 - Philadelphia: Routledge.
    The psychological writing of Jung and the post-Jungians is all too often ignored as anachronistic, archaic and mystic. In Jung and the Postmodern, Christopher Hauke challenges this, arguing that Jungian psychology is more relevant now than ever before - not only can it be a response to modernity, but it can offer a critique of modernity and Enlightenment values which brings it in line with the postmodern critique of contemporary culture. After introducing Jungians to postmodern themes in Jameson, Baudrillard, (...)
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