21 found
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  1. Great Minds Think Different: Preserving Cognitive Diversity in an Age of Gene Editing.Jonny Anomaly, Julian Savulescu & Christopher Gyngell - 2020 - Bioethics 34 (1):81-89.
  2.  37
    Moral Reasons to Edit the Human Genome: Picking Up From the Nuffield Report.Christopher Gyngell, Hilary Bowman-Smart & Julian Savulescu - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (8):514-523.
    In July 2018, the Nuffield Council of Bioethics released its long-awaited report on heritable genome editing. The Nuffield report was notable for finding that HGE could be morally permissible, even in cases of human enhancement. In this paper, we summarise the findings of the Nuffield Council report, critically examine the guiding principles they endorse and suggest ways in which the guiding principles could be strengthened. While we support the approach taken by the Nuffield Council, we argue that detailed consideration of (...)
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  3.  96
    Germline Gene Editing and the Precautionary Principle.Julian J. Koplin, Christopher Gyngell & Julian Savulescu - 2020 - Bioethics 34 (1):49-59.
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  4. Selecting Against Disability: The Liberal Eugenic Challenge and the Argument From Cognitive Diversity.Christopher Gyngell & Thomas Douglas - 2018 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (2):319-340.
    Selection against embryos that are predisposed to develop disabilities is one of the less controversial uses of embryo selection technologies. Many bio-conservatives argue that while the use of ESTs to select for non-disease-related traits, such as height and eye-colour, should be banned, their use to avoid disease and disability should be permitted. Nevertheless, there remains significant opposition, particularly from the disability rights movement, to the use of ESTs to select against disability. In this article we examine whether and why the (...)
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  5.  16
    Collective Reflective Equilibrium in Practice (CREP) and Controversial Novel Technologies.Julian Savulescu, Christopher Gyngell & Guy Kahane - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (7):652-663.
    Bioethics, Volume 35, Issue 7, Page 652-663, September 2021.
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  6.  24
    ‘Is It Better Not to Know Certain Things?’: Views of Women Who Have Undergone Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing on its Possible Future Applications.Hilary Bowman-Smart, Julian Savulescu, Cara Mand, Christopher Gyngell, Mark D. Pertile, Sharon Lewis & Martin B. Delatycki - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (4):231-238.
    Non-invasive prenatal testing is at the forefront of prenatal screening. Current uses for NIPT include fetal sex determination and screening for chromosomal disorders such as trisomy 21. However, NIPT may be expanded to many different future applications. There are a potential host of ethical concerns around the expanding use of NIPT, as examined by the recent Nuffield Council report on the topic. It is important to examine what NIPT might be used for before these possibilities become consumer reality. There is (...)
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  7.  11
    Drugs, Genes and Screens: The Ethics of Preventing and Treating Spinal Muscular Atrophy.Christopher Gyngell, Zornitza Stark & Julian Savulescu - 2020 - Bioethics 34 (5):493-501.
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  8.  8
    The Moral Case for Sign Language Education.Julian Savulescu, Angela Morgan, Christopher Gyngell & Hilary Bowman-Smart - 2019 - Monash Bioethics Review 37 (3-4):94-110.
    Here, a moral case is presented as to why sign languages such as Auslan should be made compulsory in general school curricula. Firstly, there are significant benefits that accrue to individuals from learning sign language. Secondly, sign language education is a matter of justice; the normalisation of sign language education and use would particularly benefit marginalised groups, such as those living with a communication disability. Finally, the integration of sign languages into the curricula would enable the flourishing of Deaf culture (...)
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  9.  15
    Drawing the Line on in Vitro Gametogenesis.Lauren Notini, Christopher Gyngell & Julian Savulescu - 2020 - Bioethics 34 (1):123-134.
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  10.  93
    Ethics and the Risks of Gene Editing.Julian Savulescu & Christopher Gyngell - forthcoming - Ethics in Biology, Engineering and Medicine: An International Journal.
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  11. 1 Good Parents and New Reproductive Technologies.Christopher Gyngell - 2019 - In Emilian Mihailov, Tenzin Wangmo, Victoria Federiuc & Bernice Elger (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Bioethics: European Perspectives. De Gruyter Open. pp. 1-10.
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  12.  11
    Subsidizing PGD: The Moral Case for Funding Genetic Selection.James M. Kemper, Christopher Gyngell & Julian Savulescu - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (3):405-414.
    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis allows the detection of genetic abnormalities in embryos produced through in vitro fertilization. Current funding models in Australia provide governmental subsidies for couples undergoing IVF, but do not extend to PGD. There are strong reasons for publicly funding PGD that follow from the moral principles of autonomy, beneficence and justice for both parents and children. We examine the objections to our proposal, specifically concerns regarding designer babies and the harm of disabled individuals, and show why these are (...)
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  13.  22
    The Medical Case for Gene Editing.Julian Savulescu & Christopher Gyngell - 2015 - Ethics in Biology, Engineering and Medicine: An International Journal 6 (1-2):57-66.
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  14.  67
    Promoting Biodiversity.Christopher Gyngell & Julian Savulescu - 2017 - Philosophy and Technology 30 (4):413-426.
    Advances in biotechnology mean that it may soon be possible to recreate previously extinct species. This has led to an emerging debate within bioethics about whether we ought to reintroduce extinct species into our ecosystems. In this paper, we discuss the role that biodiversity could play in this debate. Many believe that biodiversity is a good that should be protected. We argue that if biodiversity is a good, then this suggests it should also be promoted, including by reintroducing previously extinct (...)
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  15.  2
    Moving From ‘Fully’ to ‘Appropriately’ Informed Consent in Genomics: The PROMICE Framework.Julian J. Koplin, Christopher Gyngell, Julian Savulescu & Danya F. Vears - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (6):655-665.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 6, Page 655-665, July 2022.
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  16.  4
    Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing for “Non-Medical” Traits: Ensuring Consistency in Ethical Decision-Making.Hilary Bowman-Smart, Christopher Gyngell, Cara Mand, David J. Amor, Martin B. Delatycki & Julian Savulescu - forthcoming - American Journal of Bioethics:1-18.
    The scope of noninvasive prenatal testing could expand in the future to include detailed analysis of the fetal genome. This will allow for the testing for virtually any trait with a genetic...
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  17.  18
    Emerging Moral Status Issues. [REVIEW]Christopher Gyngell & Julian J. Koplin - 2020 - Monash Bioethics Review 38 (2):95-104.
    Many controversies in bioethics turn on questions of moral status. Some moral status issues have received extensive bioethical attention, including those raised by abortion, embryo experimentation, and animal research. Beyond these established debates lie a less familiar set of moral status issues, many of which are tied to recent scientific breakthroughs. This review article surveys some key developments that raise moral status issues, including the development of in vitro brains, part-human animals, “synthetic” embryos, and artificial womb technologies. It introduces the (...)
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  18.  25
    Fighting Death and Preventing Birth: Perspectives on New Methuselahs John K. Davis MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 2018, 368 Pp, Hardcover, US$40.00, Pages ISBN: 9780262038133. [REVIEW]Christopher Gyngell - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (7):849-850.
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  19.  20
    Genome Editing, Goldilocks and Polygenic Risk Scores.Julian Savulescu & Christopher Gyngell - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (8):530-531.
    Heritable genome editing is officially here. ‘Lulu’ and ‘Nana’, born in China, are the first children whose genomes have been intentionally modified. A third gene edited baby may have already been born. Scientists in Russia are planning similar applications.1 We recently argued that HGE should be judged by the same ethical standards that we apply to other technologies.2 There is a moral imperative to improve the health of future generations, to reduce inequalities and improve standards of living. If we can (...)
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  20.  1
    Contemporary Challenges in Children’s Health: Law, Ethics and Policy.Michelle Taylor-Sands & Christopher Gyngell - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (Suppl 1):1-3.
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  21.  1
    Consent for Rapid Genomic Sequencing for Critically Ill Children: Legal and Ethical Issues.Danya Vears, Zornitza Stark, Fiona Lynch & Christopher Gyngell - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (Suppl 1):117-129.
    Although rapid genomic sequencing is improving care for critically ill children with rare disease, it also raises important ethical questions that need to be explored as its use becomes more widespread. Two such questions relate to the degree of consent that should be required for RGS to proceed and whether it might ever be appropriate to override parents’ decisions not to allow RGS to be performed in their critically ill child. To explore these questions, we first examine the legal frameworks (...)
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