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Christopher Knapp [12]Christopher Robert Knapp [1]
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Profile: Christopher Knapp
Profile: Christopher Morgan-Knapp (State University of New York at Binghamton)
  1.  27
    De-Moralizing Disgustingness.Christopher Knapp - 2003 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (2):253–278.
    Understanding disgustingness is philosophically important partly because claims about disgustingness play a prominent role in moral discourse and practice. It is also important because disgustingness has been used to illustrate the promise of "neo-sentimentalism." Recently developed by moral philosophers such as David Wiggins, John McDowell, Simon Blackburn, Justin D'Arms and Dan Jacobson, neo-sentimentalism holds that for a thing to be disgusting is for it to be "appropriate" to respond to it with disgust. In this paper, I argue that from what (...)
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  2.  15
    Trading Quality for Quantity.Christopher Knapp - 2007 - Journal of Philosophical Research 32 (1):211-233.
    This paper deals with problems that vagueness raises for choices involving evaluative tradeoffs. I focus on a species of such choices, which I call ‘qualitative barrier cases.’ These are cases in which a qualitatively significant tradeoff in one evaluative dimension for a given improvement in another dimension could not make an option better all things considered, but a merely quantitative tradeoff for the given improvement might. Trouble arises, however, when one of the options constitutes a borderline case of an evaluative (...)
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  3.  33
    Species Inegalitarianism as a Matter of Principle.Christopher Knapp - 2009 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (2):174-189.
    Most critics of species egalitarianism point to its counter-intuitive implications in particular cases. But this argumentative strategy is vulnerable to the response that our intuitions should give way in the face of arguments showing that species egalitarianism is required by our deepest, most fundamental moral principles. In this article, I develop an argument against deontological versions of species egalitarianism on its own terms. Appealing to the fundamental moral ideal of proportionality, I show that deontological species egalitarianism is morally objectionable as (...)
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  4.  19
    Assessing Grading.Christopher Knapp - 2007 - Public Affairs Quarterly 21 (3):275-294.
    This paper begins with a description of common grading practices at universities in the U.S., and analyzes the unfairness, injustice, and harm they produce. It then proposes a solution to these problems in the form of an alternative grading system: institutions should adopt a grading system that assesses students’ performance relative to the performance of their peers. That is, institutions should abolish the practice of attempting to assign grades that correspond to an absolute standard of intrinsic merit. Instead, our evaluation (...)
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  5.  38
    On Disgust.Christopher Knapp - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (2):523-526.
  6.  25
    Equality and Proportionality.Christopher Knapp - 2007 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (2):179-201.
    Contemporary moral egalitarians hold that all people have equal moral standing and that we deserve this standing in virtue of satisfying some descriptive criterion. These two claims appear to be in tension, however, as none of the proposed criteria are attributes that all people possess equally. Many egalitarians have hoped to eliminate this tension by holding that the descriptive criterion of moral standing is a "range property" – that is, a property one either possesses fully or not at all. I (...)
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  7.  1
    Trading Quality for Quantity.Christopher Knapp - 2007 - Journal of Philosophical Research 32:211-233.
    This paper deals with problems that vagueness raises for choices involving evaluative tradeoffs. I focus on a species of such choices, which I call ‘qualitative barrier cases.’ These are cases in which a qualitatively significant tradeoff in one evaluative dimension for a given improvement in another dimension could not make an option better all things considered, but a merely quantitative tradeoff for the given improvement might. Trouble arises, however, when one of the options constitutes a borderline case of an evaluative (...)
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  8.  8
    When Hard Choices Become Easy.Christopher Knapp - 2004 - American Journal of Philosophy 41 (4):232-330.
    By analyzing cases in which we must choose between options whose values are not precisely comparable, this paper presents the case for the existence of a previously unrecognized class of practical reasons – reasons that arise from how the value of an option compares to the values of the alternatives. Several implications of these comparative value-based reasons are discussed – including the context-dependence of one option’s being ‘rationally preferable to’ an alternative, and the fact that, even when the values of (...)
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  9. De-Moralizing Disgustingness.Christopher Knapp - 2003 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (2):253-278.
    Understanding disgustingness is philosophically important partly because claims about disgustingness play a prominent role in moral discourse and practice. It is also important because disgustingness has been used to illustrate the promise of “neo-sentimentalism.” Recently developed by moral philosophers such as David Wiggins, John McDowell, Simon Blackburn, Justin D’Arms and Dan Jacobson, neo-sentimentalism holds that for a thing to be disgusting is for it to be “appropriate” to respond to it with disgust. In this paper, I argue that from what (...)
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  10. Equality And Proportionality.Christopher Knapp - 2007 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (2):179-201.
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  11. Tragedies Without Commons.Christopher Knapp - 2011 - Public Affairs Quarterly 25 (1):81-94.
    Commons problems are, understandably enough, typically thought to be problems about commons. In this paper, however, I argue that what generates some prominent examples of commons problems is not open access to a good. Instead, what generates some commons problems is a conflict of values that have different structures. After making this case, I show how the existence of such problems can motivate a version of the Precautionary Principle and a (qualified) rejection of cost-benefit analysis.
     
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  12. When Hard Choices Become Easy.Christopher Knapp - 2004 - American Philosophical Quarterly 41 (4):323-330.
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