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Christopher Mayes [17]Christopher R. Mayes [2]
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Profile: Christopher Mayes (University of Sydney)
  1.  1
    Health Professionals “Make Their Choice”: Pharmaceutical Industry Leaders’ Understandings of Conflict of Interest.Quinn Grundy, Lisa Tierney, Christopher Mayes & Wendy Lipworth - forthcoming - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-13.
    Conflicts of interest, stemming from relationships between health professionals and the pharmaceutical industry, remain a highly divisive and inflammatory issue in healthcare. Given that most jurisdictions rely on industry to self-regulate with respect to its interactions with health professionals, it is surprising that little research has explored industry leaders’ understandings of conflicts of interest. Drawing from in-depth interviews with ten pharmaceutical industry leaders based in Australia, we explore the normalized and structural management of conflicts of interest within pharmaceutical companies. We (...)
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  2.  8
    Bioethics and Epistemic Scientism.Christopher Mayes, Claire Hooker & Ian Kerridge - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (4):565-567.
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  3.  3
    Debates About Conflict of Interest in Medicine: Deconstructing a Divided Discourse.Serena Purdy, Miles Little, Christopher Mayes & Wendy Lipworth - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):135-149.
    The pharmaceutical industry plays an increasingly dominant role in healthcare, raising concerns about “conflicts of interest” on the part of the medical professionals who interact with the industry. However, there is considerable disagreement over the extent to which COI is a problem and how it should be managed. Participants in debates about COI have become entrenched in their views, which is both unproductive and deeply confusing for the majority of medical professionals trying to work in an increasingly commercialized environment. We (...)
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  4.  4
    Impure Politics and Pure Science: Efficacious Ebola Medications Are Only a Palliation and Not a Cure for Structural Disadvantage.Chris Degeling, Jane Johnson & Christopher Mayes - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (4):43-45.
  5.  1
    Declarations, Accusations and Judgement: Examining Conflict of Interest Discourses as Performative Speech-Acts.Christopher Mayes, Wendy Lipworth & Ian Kerridge - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (3):455-462.
  6.  77
    The Violence of Care: An Analysis of Foucault's Pastor.Christopher Mayes - 2010 - Journal of Cultural and Religious Theory.
    This paper will address Foucault’s analysis of the Hebrew and Christian pastor and argue that Foucault’s analysis of pastoral power in Security, Territory, Population neglects an important characteristic of the shepherd/pastor figure: violence. Despite Foucault’s close analysis of the early development of the Hebrew pastor, he overlooks the role of violence and instead focuses on sacrifice. However the sacrificial pastor does not figure in the Hebrew Scriptures. The Hebrew pastor is called to lead, feed and protect the flock, not sacrifice (...)
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  7.  37
    Pastoral Power and the Confessing Subject in Patient-Centred Communication.Christopher Mayes - 2009 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (4):483-493.
    This paper examines the power relations in “patient-centred communication”. Drawing on the work of Michel Foucault I argue that while patient-centred communication frees the patient from particular aspects of medical power, it also introduces the patient to new power relations. The paper uses a Foucauldian analysis of power to argue that patient-centred communication introduces a new dynamic of power relations to the medical encounter, entangling and producing the patient to participate in the medical encounter in a particular manner.
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  8.  10
    Is Nutritional Advocacy Morally Indigestible? A Critical Analysis of the Scientific and Ethical Implications of 'Healthy' Food Choice Discourse in Liberal Societies.Christopher Mayes & Donald B. Thompson - 2014 - Public Health Ethics 7 (2):158-169.
    Medical and non-medical experts increasingly argue that individuals, whether they are diagnosed with a specific chronic disease or condition or not (and whether they are judged at minimal risk of these consequences or not), have an obligation to make ‘healthy’ food choices. We argue that this obligation is neither scientifically nor ethically justified at the level of the individual. Our intent in the article is not simply to argue against moralization of the value of prudential uses of food for nutritional (...)
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  9.  2
    The Political and Ethical Challenge of Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis.Ross Upshur, Ian Kerridge, Wendy Lipworth, Christopher Mayes & Chris Degeling - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (1):107-113.
    This article critically examines current responses to multi-drug resistant tuberculosis and argues that bioethics needs to be willing to engage in a more radical critique of the problem than is currently offered. In particular, we need to focus not simply on market-driven models of innovation and anti-microbial solutions to emergent and re-emergent infections such as TB. The global community also needs to address poverty and the structural factors that entrench inequalities—thus moving beyond the orthodox medical/public health frame of reference.
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  10.  21
    What Should We Eat? Biopolitics, Ethics, and Nutritional Scientism.Christopher R. Mayes & Donald B. Thompson - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (4):587-599.
    Public health advocates, government agencies, and commercial organizations increasingly use nutritional science to guide food choice and diet as a way of promoting health, preventing disease, or marketing products. We argue that in many instances such references to nutritional science can be characterized as nutritional scientism. We examine three manifestations of nutritional scientism: the simplification of complex science to increase the persuasiveness of dietary guidance, superficial and honorific references to science in order to justify cultural or ideological views about food (...)
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  11.  16
    On the Fragility of Medical Virtue in a Neoliberal Context: The Case of Commercial Conflicts of Interest in Reproductive Medicine.Christopher Mayes, Brette Blakely, Ian Kerridge, Paul Komesaroff, Ian Olver & Wendy Lipworth - 2016 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (1):97-111.
    Social, political, and economic environments play an active role in nurturing professional virtue. Yet, these environments can also lead to the erosion of virtue. As such, professional virtue is fragile and vulnerable to environmental shifts. While physicians are often considered to be among the most virtuous of professional groups, concern has also always existed about the impact of commercial arrangements on physicians’ willingness and capacity to enact their professional virtues. This article examines the ways in which commercial arrangements have been (...)
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  12.  13
    The Harm of Bioethics: A Critique of Singer and Callahan on Obesity.Christopher Mayes - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (3):217-221.
    Debate concerning the social impact of obesity has been ongoing since at least the 1980s. Bioethicists, however, have been relatively silent. If obesity is addressed it tends to be in the context of resource allocation or clinical procedures such as bariatric surgery. However, prominent bioethicists Peter Singer and Dan Callahan have recently entered the obesity debate to argue that obesity is not simply a clinical or personal issue but an ethical issue with social and political consequences. This article critically examines (...)
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  13.  17
    On the Importance of the Institution and Social Self in a Sociology of Conflicts of Interest.Christopher Mayes - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry (Browse Results) 9 (2):217-218.
    On the Importance of the Institution and Social Self in a Sociology of Conflicts of Interest Content Type Journal Article Category Case Studies Pages 1-2 DOI 10.1007/s11673-012-9355-1 Authors Christopher Mayes, Rock Ethics Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, 201 Willard Building, University Park, PA 16802-1601, USA Journal Journal of Bioethical Inquiry Online ISSN 1872-4353 Print ISSN 1176-7529.
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  14.  4
    Revisiting Foucault's ‘Normative Confusions’: Surveying the Debate Since the Collège de France Lectures.Christopher R. Mayes - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (12):841-855.
    At once historical and philosophical, Michel Foucault used his genealogical method to expose the contingent conditions constituting the institutions, sciences and practices of the present. His analyses of the asylum, clinic, prison and sexuality revealed the historical, political and epistemological forces that make up certain types of subjects, sciences and sites of control. Although noting the originality of his work, a number of early critics questioned the normative framework of Foucault's method. Nancy Fraser argued that Foucault's genealogical method was ‘normatively (...)
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  15.  1
    Johanna Oksala, Foucault, Politics, and Violence , ISBN: 978-0818128033.Christopher Mayes - 2014 - Foucault Studies 17:232.
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  16.  6
    An Agrarian Imaginary in Urban Life: Cultivating Virtues and Vices Through a Conflicted History. [REVIEW]Christopher Mayes - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (2):265-286.
    This paper explores the influence and use of agrarian thought on collective understandings of food practices as sources of ethical and communal value in urban contexts. A primary proponent of agrarian thought that this paper engages is Paul Thompson and his exceptional book, The Agrarian Vision. Thompson aims to use agrarian ideals of agriculture and communal life to rethink current issues of sustainability and environmental ethics. However, Thompson perceives the current cultural mood as hostile to agrarian virtue. There are two (...)
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  17.  1
    On the Importance of the Institution and Social Self in a Sociology of Conflicts of Interest.Christopher Mayes - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (2):217-218.
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  18. Scientism, Conflicts of Interest, and the Marginalization of Ethics in Medical Education.Christopher Mayes, Jane Williams, Ian Kerridge & Wendy Lipworth - forthcoming - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.
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  19. Unsettling Food Politics: Agriculture, Dispossession and Sovereignty in Australia.Christopher Mayes - 2018 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    Over the past 25 years, activists and scholars have been arguing that the industrialized global food system undermines population health and is environmentally unsustainable. This book uses current debates over Michel Foucault’s method of genealogy as a practice of critique to reveal the historical constitution of contemporary alternative food discourses.
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