Results for 'Christopher Upton'

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  1.  11
    Graham Rees Assisted by Christopher Upton. Francis Bacon's Natural Philosophy: A New Source. A Transcription of Manuscript Hardwick 72A with Translation and Commentary. Chalfont St Giles, Bucks.: British Society for the History of Science, 1984. £7.90. [REVIEW]Brian Vickers - 1988 - British Journal for the History of Science 21 (2):256-257.
  2.  5
    Francis Bacon's Natural Philosophy: A New Source. A Transcription of Manuscript Hardwick 72A with Translation and CommentaryFrancis Bacon Graham Rees Christopher Upton.Gary B. Deason - 1986 - Isis 77 (1):194-195.
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  3.  42
    John Hazel Smith : Thomas Watson, Absalom; John Foxe, Christus Triumphans. Pp. Iv + 243. Hildesheim, Zurich and New York: Georg Olms, 1988. Paper, DM 98. - Malcolm M. Brennan : Risus Anglicanus; John Hacket, Loiola. Pp. Iv + 203. Hildesheim, Zürich and New York: Georg Olms, 1988. Paper, DM 98. - Christopher Upton : John Christopherson, Iephte; William Goldingham, Herodes. Pp. Iv + 125. Hildesheim, Zürich and New York: Georg Olms, 1989. Paper, DM 74. - E. F. J. Tucker : Edward Forsett, Pedantius. Pp. Iv + 196. Hildesheim, Zürich and New York: George Olms, 1989. Paper, DM 98. - Margaret J. Arnold : Pastor Fidus; Parthenia; Clytophon. Pp. Ii + 160. Hildesheim, Zürich and New York: Georg Olms, 1990. Paper. [REVIEW]G. Eatough - 1991 - The Classical Review 41 (1):270-271.
  4. Francis Bacon's Natural Philosophy, a New Source a Transcription of Manuscript Hardwick 72a with Translation and Commentary.Graham Rees, Christopher Upton, Francis Bacon & British Society for the History of Science - 1984
     
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  5. Francis Bacon's Natural Philosophy a New Source, a Transcription of Manuscript Hardwick 72a.Francis Bacon, Graham Rees, Christopher Upton & British Society for the History of Science - 1984 - British Society for the History of Science.
     
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  6.  7
    Context, Character and Consequentialist Friendships: Candace L. Upton.Candace L. Upton - 2008 - Utilitas 20 (3):334-347.
    One prevailing objection to consequentialism holds that the consequentialist cannot promote both agent-neutral value and her own personal friendships: the consequentialist cannot be a genuine friend. Several versions of this objection have been advanced, but an even more sophisticated version of the charge is available. However, even this more sophisticated version fails, as it assumes a traditional, context-insensitive, account of character traits. In this article, I develop and defend a novel account of character traits that is context-sensitive and also supports (...)
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  7. The Structure of Character.Candace L. Upton - 2009 - The Journal of Ethics 13 (2-3):175-193.
    In this paper, I defend a local account of character traits that posits traits like close-friend-honesty and good-mood-compassion. John Doris also defends local character traits, but his local character traits are indistinguishable from mere behavioral dispositions, they are not necessary for the purpose which allegedly justifies them, and their justification is only contingent, depending upon the prevailing empirical situation. The account of local traits I defend posits local traits that are traits of character rather than behavioral dispositions, local traits that (...)
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  8. Virtue Ethics and Moral Psychology: The Situationism Debate.Candace L. Upton - 2009 - The Journal of Ethics 13 (2-3):103-115.
  9.  32
    The Empirical Argument Against Virtue.Candace Upton - 2016 - The Journal of Ethics 20 (4):355-371.
    The virtues are under fire. Several decades’ worth of social psychological findings establish a correlation between human behavior and the situation moral agents inhabit, from which a cadre of moral philosophers concludes that most moral agents lack the virtues. Mark Alfano and Christian Miller introduce novel versions of this argument, but they are subject to a fatal dilemma. Alfano and Miller wrongly assume that their requirements for virtue apply universally to moral agents, who vary radically in their psychological, physiological, and (...)
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  10. Can There Be a Moral Duty to Cheat in Sport?Hugh Upton - 2011 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 5 (2):161 - 174.
    Sport, Ethics and Philosophy, Volume 5, Issue 2, Page 161-174, May 2011.
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  11.  20
    Meditation and the Cultivation of Virtue.Candace Upton - 2017 - Philosophical Psychology 30 (4):373-394.
    In recent decades, social psychology has produced an expansive array of studies wherein introducing a seemingly morally innocuous feature into the situation a subject inhabits often yields morally questionable, dubious, or even appalling behavior. Several fascinating lines of philosophical enquiry issue from this research, but the most pragmatically salient question concerns how we ought most effectively to develop and maintain the virtues so that such putatively morally problematic behavior is less likely to occur. In this paper, I examine four empirically (...)
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  12. Some 14th Century Tracts on the Probationes Terminorum Martin of Alnwick, O.F.M., Richard Billingham, Edward Upton and Others. [REVIEW]Richard Martin, Edward Billingham, Lambertus Marie de Upton & Rijk - 1982
     
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  13.  73
    A Contextual Account of Character Traits.Candace L. Upton - 2005 - Philosophical Studies 122 (2):133-151.
    Character traits have several vital functions. They should enable us to assess others morally, inform us of others’ behavioral tendencies, and accurately explain and predict others’ behavior. But traits of character, as they have traditionally been understood, cannot adequately serve these purposes. For character traits are traditionally thought to be context-insensitive. The Contextual Account of Character Traits, which I here develop and defend, posits traits that are context-sensitive. Context-sensitive character traits are more receptive to the complexity of human psychology and (...)
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  14.  35
    Reconsidering the Ad Hominem: Christopher M. Johnson.Christopher M. Johnson - 2009 - Philosophy 84 (2):251-266.
    Ad hominem arguments are generally dismissed on the grounds that they are not attempts to engage in rational discourse, but are rather aimed at undermining argument by diverting attention from claims made to assessments of character of persons making claims. The manner of this dismissal however is based upon an unlikely paradigm of rationality: it is based upon the presumption that our intellectual capacities are not as limited as in fact they are, and do not vary as much as they (...)
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  15.  40
    Christopher Janaway.Christopher Janaway - 2006 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 80 (1):339–357.
  16. Our Entitlement to Self-Knowledge: II. Christopher Peacocke: Entitlement, Self-Knowledge and Conceptual Redeployment.Tyler Burge & Christopher Peacocke - 1996 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 96 (1):91-116.
  17.  38
    II—Christopher Shields: The Peculiar Motion of Aristotelian Souls.Christopher Shields - 2007 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 81 (1):139-161.
  18.  61
    Christopher J. Preston, Wayne Ouderkirk (Eds): Nature, Value, Duty: Life on Earth with Holmes Rolston, III. [REVIEW]Christopher C. Robinson - 2008 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (5):477-484.
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  19.  17
    Democracy.Hugh Upton & Ross Harrison - 1996 - Philosophical Quarterly 46 (183):271.
    Democracy surrounds us like the air we breath, and is normally taken very much for granted. Across the world democracy has become accepted as an unquestionably good thing. Yet upon further examination the merits of democracy are both paradoxical and problematic, and the treasured values of liberty and equality can be used to argue both for and against it. In the historical section of the book, Ross Harrison clearly traces the history of democracy by examining the works of, amongst others, (...)
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  20.  21
    Organ Transplants and Ethics.Hugh Upton & David Lamb - 1991 - Philosophical Quarterly 41 (164):381.
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  21.  27
    Situational Traits of Character: Dispositional Foundations and Implications for Moral Psychology and Friendship.Candace L. Upton - 2009 - Lexington Books.
    Introduction -- Global traits of character -- Traits as dispositions -- Situational traits of character -- Situational traits and social psychology -- Situational traits and the friendly consequentialist.
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  22.  27
    A Note on A Ristotelian Epagōgē.Thomas V. Upton - 1981 - Phronesis 26 (2):172-176.
  23.  59
    Lack of Character: Personality and Moral Behavior. [REVIEW]Candace Upton - 2005 - Journal of Value Inquiry 39 (3-4):507-512.
  24.  85
    Discussion of Christopher Peacocke’s A Study of Concepts. [REVIEW]David Papineau & Christopher Peacocke - 1996 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (2):425.
    Christopher Peacocke’s A Study of Concepts is a dense and rewarding work. Each chapter raises many issues for discussion. I know three different people who are writing reviews of the volume. It testifies to the depth of Peacocke’s book that each reviewer is focusing on a quite different set of topics.
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  25.  17
    Knowledge and Use of Evidence‐Based Practice of GPs and Hospital Doctors.Dominic Upton & Penney Upton - 2006 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (3):376-384.
  26.  16
    Virtue and Nature: Christopher W. Gowans.Christopher W. Gowans - 2008 - Social Philosophy and Policy 25 (1):28-55.
    The Neo-Aristotelian ethical naturalism of Philippa Foot and Rosalind Hursthouse purports to establish a naturalistic criterion for the virtues. Specifically, by developing a parallel between the natural ends of nonhuman animals and the natural ends of human beings, they argue that character traits are justified as virtues by the extent to which they promote and do not inhibit natural ends such as self-preservation, reproduction, and the well-being of one’s social group. I argue that the approach of Foot and Hursthouse cannot (...)
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  27.  83
    Upton on Evil Pleasures.Geoffrey Scarre - 2001 - Utilitas 13 (1):106-111.
    In a recent contribution to Utilitas Hugh Upton has criticized my defence of utilitarianism against the charge that it is committed to regarding the pleasures taken by sadists in other people's pain as increasing the amount of good in the world and so at least partially offsetting the suffering of the victims. In the present paper I clarify and defend my view that sadists implicitly insult their own human qualities, thus rendering it impossible to respect themselves as human beings, (...)
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  28.  14
    II—Christopher Janaway.Christopher Janaway - 2006 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 80 (1):339-357.
  29.  32
    Teaching Science and Religion in the Twenty‐First Century: The Many Pedagogical Roles of Christopher Southgate.Christopher Corbally & Margaret Boone Rappaport - 2018 - Zygon 53 (3):897-908.
    With the goal of understanding how Christopher Southgate communicates his in-depth knowledge of both science and theology, we investigated the many roles he assumes as a teacher. We settled upon wide-ranging topics that all intertwine: (1) his roles as author and coordinating editor of a premier textbook on science and theology, now in its third edition; (2) his oral presentations worldwide, including plenaries, workshops, and short courses; and (3) the team teaching approach itself, which is often needed by others (...)
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  30.  28
    Psychological and Metaphysical Dimensions of Non-Contradiction in Aristotle.Thomas V. Upton - 1982 - Review of Metaphysics 36 (3):591 - 606.
    RECENT attempts to explain and justify Aristotle's principle of non-contradiction have focused to a great extent on the dialectical dimension of Aristotle's account. For example, T. Irwin maintains that Aristotle justifies the PNC by arguing that there is a sub-set of dialectical opinions which no one can rationally give up. J. Lear supports the importance of the dialectical dimension by summarizing Aristotle's defense of the PNC as follows: The opponent of the PNC tries to argue dialectically that one should not (...)
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  31.  79
    Presumed Consent and Organ Donation.Hugh Upton - 2012 - Clinical Ethics 7 (3):142-146.
    This article explores the meaning and moral significance of presumed consent with particular reference to an opt-out policy for postmortem organ donation. It does so under two general categories: circumstances where we believe consent to have been given and those where we have no reason to believe that it has either been given or been refused. In the context of an opt-out policy, the first category would relate to the idea of tacit consent. It is argued both that substituting the (...)
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  32.  20
    Alfano, Mark. Character as Moral Fiction.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Pp. 234. $90.00.Candace L. Upton - 2014 - Ethics 124 (3):598-602.
  33.  67
    Scarre on Evil Pleasures.Hugh Upton - 2000 - Utilitas 12 (1):97.
    Utilitarianism faces a difficulty in that what are typically regarded as natural goods seem to have possible occurrences that strike most people as morally reprehensible, yet which according to the theory must be taken to add to the good in the world. Thus, totake a recent treatment of the problem by Geoffrey Scarre, it would seem that even sadistic pleasures must contribute to human happiness and thus morally offset the concomitant suffering of the victim. Scarre has offered a defence of (...)
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  34.  71
    Moral Theory and Theorizing in Health Care Ethics.Hugh Upton - 2011 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (4):431-443.
    This paper takes up the question of the role of philosophical moral theory in our attempts to resolve the ethical problems that arise in health care, with particular reference to the contention that we need theory to be determinative of our choice of actions. Moral theorizing is distinguished from moral theories and the prospects for determinacy from the latter are examined through a consideration of the most promising candidates: utilitarianism, deontology and the procedures involved in reflective equilibrium. It is argued (...)
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  35.  66
    The Relation Between Self-Interest and Justice in Contractarian Ethics*: CHRISTOPHER W. MORRIS.Christopher W. Morris - 1988 - Social Philosophy and Policy 5 (2):119-153.
    One of the most noteworthy features of David Gauthier's rational choice, contractarian theory of morality is its appeal to self-interested rationality. This appeal, however, will undoubtedly be the source of much controversy and criticism. For while self-interestedness is characteristic of much human behavior, it is not characteristic of all such behavior, much less of that which is most admirable. Yet contractarian ethics appears to assume that humans are entirely self-interested. It is not usually thought a virtue of a theory that (...)
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  36.  36
    The If-It-is Question in Aristotle.Thomas V. Upton - 1991 - Ancient Philosophy 11 (2):315-330.
  37.  89
    Deconstruction, Anti–Realism and Philosophy of Science—an Interview with Christopher Norris.Christopher Norris & Marianna Papastephanou - 2002 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 36 (2):265–289.
    In this interview, Christopher Norris discusses a wide range of issues having to do with postmodernism, deconstruction and other controversial topics of debate within present-day philosophy and critical theory. More specifically he challenges the view of deconstruction as just another offshoot of the broader postmodernist trend in cultural studies and the social sciences. Norris puts the case for deconstruction as continuing the 'unfinished project of modernity' and—in particular—for Derrida's work as sustaining the values of enlightened critical reason in various (...)
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  38.  31
    Virtue Ethics, Character, and Normative Receptivity.Candace Upton - 2008 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 5 (1):77-95.
    Classically-conceived accounts of character posit traits that are both dynamic and global. Dynamic traits produce behavior, and global traits produce behavior across the full range of situation kinds relevant to a particular trait. If you are classically just, for example, you would behave justly across the full range of situation kinds relevant to justice. But classical traits are too crude to fulfill trait attributions' intrinsically normative purpose, which is to reflect the moral merit agents deserve. I defend an extra-classical account (...)
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  39.  96
    The Very Idea of Popular Sovereignty: “We the People” Reconsidered*: CHRISTOPHER W. MORRIS.Christopher W. Morris - 2000 - Social Philosophy and Policy 17 (1):1-26.
    The sovereignty of the people, it is widely said, is the foundation of modern democracy. The truth of this claim depends on the plausibility of attributing sovereignty to “the people” in the first place, and I shall express skepticism about this possibility. I shall suggest as well that the notion of popular sovereignty is complex, and that appeals to the notion may be best understood as expressing several different ideas and ideals. This essay distinguishes many of these and suggests that (...)
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  40.  49
    Right-Based Morality and Hohfeld's Relations.Hugh Upton - 2000 - The Journal of Ethics 4 (3):237-256.
    The paper begins by defending the Hohfeldianaccount of rights (as equivalence relations) from thecharge that it cannot capture their specialsignificance, and thus cannot be used in a right-basedmoral theory. It goes on to argue that, because of amisunderstanding of this relational account, theconception of right-based morality that has emerged inrecent years has been variously flawed from theoutset. A particular form of explanatory priority waswrongly taken to be essential, and then eitherincoherently combined with equivalence, or taken to bea reason for rejecting (...)
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  41.  10
    The If-It-Is Question in Aristotle.Thomas V. Upton - 1991 - Ancient Philosophy 11 (2):315-330.
  42.  21
    Aristotle on Hypothesis and the Unhypothesized First Principle.Thomas V. Upton - 1985 - Review of Metaphysics 39 (2):283 - 301.
  43.  29
    An Improved Cognitive Model of the Iowa and Soochow Gambling Tasks with Regard to Model Fitting Performance and Tests of Parameter Consistency.Junyi Dai, Rebecca Kerestes, Daniel J. Upton, Jerome R. Busemeyer & Julie C. Stout - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  44. Medical Analogies in Buddhist and Hellenistic Thought: Tranquillity and Anger: Christopher W. Gowans.Christopher W. Gowans - 2010 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 66:11-33.
    Medical analogies are commonly invoked in both Indian Buddhist dharma and Hellenistic philosophy. In the Pāli Canon, nirvana is depicted as a form of health, and the Buddha is portrayed as a doctor who helps us attain it. Much later in the tradition, Śāntideva described the Buddha’s teaching as ‘the sole medicine for the ailments of the world, the mine of all success and happiness.’ Cicero expressed the view of many Hellenistic philosophers when he said that philosophy is ‘a medical (...)
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  45.  33
    Deconstruction, Anti–Realism and Philosophy of Science—an Interview with Christopher Norris.Christopher Norris & Marianna Papastephanou - 2002 - Philosophy of Education 36 (2):265-289.
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  46.  16
    Christopher Winch and Peter Wells,Nene College, Northampton.Christopher Winch & Peter Wells - 1995 - British Journal of Educational Studies 43 (1):75-87.
  47. A Study of Concepts.Christopher PEACOCKE - 1992 - MIT Press.
  48.  7
    Wittgenstein's Theory of Knowledge: Christopher Coope.Christopher Coope - 1973 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 7:246-267.
    I shall start by considering the apparently paradoxical doctrines that Wittgenstein put forward about knowledge: they show how the concept of knowledge is, as he says, ‘specialized’. This is not, as I shall show, a very important issue in itself, but it leads on to other points, of more interest: how it comes about, for example, that ‘not all corrections of our beliefs are on the same level’. I shall then discuss the idea that we inherit a certain picture of (...)
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  49.  62
    Quantum Information Theory and the Foundations of Quantum Mechanics.Christopher Gordon Timpson - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Christopher G. Timpson provides the first full-length philosophical treatment of quantum information theory and the questions it raises for our understanding of the quantum world. He argues for an ontologically deflationary account of the nature of quantum information, which is grounded in a revisionary analysis of the concepts of information.
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  50. Minimal Rationality.Christopher Cherniak - 1986 - MIT Press.
    In Minimal Rationality, Christopher Cherniak boldly challenges the myth of Man the the Rational Animal and the central role that the "perfectly rational...
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