Results for 'Christopher Upton'

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  1. Francis Bacon's Natural Philosophy a New Source, a Transcription of Manuscript Hardwick 72a.Francis Bacon, Graham Rees, Christopher Upton & British Society for the History of Science - 1984 - British Society for the History of Science.
     
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  2.  14
    Francis Bacon's Natural Philosophy, a New Source a Transcription of Manuscript Hardwick 72a with Translation and Commentary.Francis Bacon, Graham Rees & Christopher Upton - 1984
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  3.  19
    Graham Rees assisted by Christopher Upton. Francis Bacon's Natural Philosophy: A New Source. A transcription of manuscript Hardwick 72A with translation and commentary. Chalfont St Giles, Bucks.: British Society for the History of Science, 1984. £7.90. [REVIEW]Brian Vickers - 1988 - British Journal for the History of Science 21 (2):256-257.
  4.  13
    Francis Bacon's Natural Philosophy: A New Source. A Transcription of Manuscript Hardwick 72A with Translation and CommentaryFrancis Bacon Graham Rees Christopher Upton.Gary B. Deason - 1986 - Isis 77 (1):194-195.
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  5.  51
    John Hazel Smith : Thomas Watson, Absalom; John Foxe, Christus Triumphans. Pp. iv + 243. Hildesheim, Zurich and New York: Georg Olms, 1988. Paper, DM 98. - Malcolm M. Brennan : Risus Anglicanus; John Hacket, Loiola. Pp. iv + 203. Hildesheim, Zürich and New York: Georg Olms, 1988. Paper, DM 98. - Christopher Upton : John Christopherson, Iephte; William Goldingham, Herodes. Pp. iv + 125. Hildesheim, Zürich and New York: Georg Olms, 1989. Paper, DM 74. - E. F. J. Tucker : Edward Forsett, Pedantius. Pp. iv + 196. Hildesheim, Zürich and New York: George Olms, 1989. Paper, DM 98. - Margaret J. Arnold : Pastor Fidus; Parthenia; Clytophon. Pp. ii + 160. Hildesheim, Zürich and New York: Georg Olms, 1990. Paper. [REVIEW]G. Eatough - 1991 - The Classical Review 41 (1):270-271.
  6.  1
    Thresholds of existence.Upton Clary Ewing - 1956 - New York,: Philosophical Library.
  7.  69
    The system of Antichrist: truth & falsehood in postmodernism and the New Age.Charles Upton - 2001 - Ghent, NY: Sophia Perennis.
    Postmodernism, globalism & the New Age -- Who are the traditionalists? -- What is the New Age? -- New Age authorities : a divided house -- The shadows of God -- The war against love -- Ufos & traditional metaphysics : a postmodern demonology -- Vigilance at the eleventh hour : a refutation of The only tradition -- Comparative eschatology -- Facing apocalypse.
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  8.  34
    Epistola de Tolerantia.Hugh Upton - 1968 - Wiley-Blackwell.
  9.  9
    Realm of Reason.Christopher Peacocke - 2003 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press UK.
    The Realm of Reason develops a new, general theory of what it is for a thinker to be entitled to form a given belief. The theory locates entitlement in the nexus of relations between truth, content, and understanding. Peacocke formulates three principles of rationalism that articulate this conception. The principles imply that all entitlement has a component that is justificationally independent of experience. The resulting position is thus a form of rationalism, generalized to all kinds of content.To show how these (...)
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  10.  77
    Peirce.Christopher Hookway - 1985 - New York: Routledge. Edited by Ted Honderich.
    This book is available either individually, or as part of the specially-priced Arguments of the Philosphers Collection.
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  11. The Alteration Thesis: Forgiveness as a Normative Power.Christopher Bennett - 2006 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 46 (2):207-233.
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  12.  49
    The Think Aloud Method in Descriptive Research.Christopher M. Aanstoos - 1983 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 14 (1-2):243-266.
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  13. Temporal actualism and singular foreknowledge.Christopher Menzel - 1991 - Philosophical Perspectives 5:475-507.
    Suppose we believe that God created the world. Then surely we want it to be the case that he intended, in some sense at least, to create THIS world. Moreover, most theists want to hold that God didn't just guess or hope that the world would take one course or another; rather, he KNEW precisely what was going to take place in the world he planned to create. In particular, of each person P, God knew that P was to exist. (...)
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  14.  13
    Care, uncertainty and intergenerational ethics.Christopher Groves - 2014 - Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave-Macmillan.
    In an age where issues like climate change and the unintended consequences of technological innovation are high on the ethical and political agenda, questions about the nature and extent of our responsibilities to future generations have never been more important, yet simultaneously so difficult to answer. This book takes a unique approach to the problem by drawing on diverse traditions of thinking about care (including developmental psychology, phenomenology and feminist ethics) to explore the nature and meaning of our relationship with (...)
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  15.  21
    Hypoactive error-related activity associated with failure to learn from errors in substance dependent individuals.Upton Daniel, O'Connor David, Charles-Walsh Kathleen, Rossiter Sarah, Moore Jennifer & Hester Robert - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  16.  2
    Knowings: in the arts of metaphysics, cosmology, and the spiritual path.Charles Upton - 2008 - San Rafael: Sophia Perennis.
    As the poet T.S. Eliot said, 'Where is the wisdom lost in knowledge? Where is the knowledge lost in information?' Our postmodern 'information culture' forces us to be over-cerebral, but it doesn't teach us to think; consequently it becomes nearly impossible for us to imagine a knowledge that is beyond information, much less a Wisdom that is beyond knowledge. We all know what it is to uselessly 'spin our wheels' in barren thought and fantasy; certain valid contemplative disciplines even have (...)
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  17.  61
    Does Kenny G play bad jazz? : A case study.Christopher Washburne - 2004 - In Christopher Washburne & Maiken Derno (eds.), Bad music: the music we love to hate. New York: Routledge. pp. 123.
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  18. Trivial music (trivialmusik) : "Preface" and "trivial music and aesthetic judgment".Christopher Washburne & Maiken Derno - 2004 - In Christopher Washburne & Maiken Derno (eds.), Bad music: the music we love to hate. New York: Routledge.
     
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  19.  18
    Caesar, Lucretius and the Dates of De Rerum Natura_ and the _Commentarii.Christopher B. Krebs - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (2):772-779.
    In February 54b.c. Cicero concludes a missive to his brother with a passing and – for us – tantalizing remark:Lucreti poemata ut scribis ita sunt, multis luminibus ingeni, multae tamen artis. sed cum veneris. virum te putabo si Sallusti Empedoclea legeris; hominem non putabo. Quintus had, it seems, readDe rerum natura, or at least parts thereof, just before he left Rome for an undisclosed location nearby, and he shared his enthusiasm with his brotherper codicillos. Meanwhile, he was corresponding with Julius (...)
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  20.  12
    Order in Multiplicity: Homonymy in the Philosophy of Aristotle.Christopher John Shields - 1998 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press UK.
    Aristotle attaches particular significance to the homonymy of many central concepts in philosophy and science: that is, to the diversity of ways of being common to a single general concept. His preoccupation with homonymy influences his approach to almost every subject that he considers, and it clearly structures the philosophical methodology that he employs both when criticizing others and when advancing his own positive theories. Where there is homonymy there is multiplicity: Aristotle aims to find the order within this multiplicity, (...)
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  21. Meditation and the Scope of Mental Action.Michael Brent & Candace Upton - 2019 - Philosophical Psychology 32 (1):52-71.
    While philosophers of mind have devoted abundant time and attention to questions of content and consciousness, philosophical questions about the nature and scope of mental action have been relatively neglected. Galen Strawson’s account of mental action, arguably the most well-known extant account, holds that cognitive mental action consists in triggering the delivery of content to one’s field of consciousness. However, Strawson fails to recognize several distinct types of mental action that might not reduce to triggering content delivery. In this paper, (...)
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  22. The expressive dimension.Christopher Potts - 2007 - Theoretical Linguistics 33 (2):165-198.
    Expressives like damn and bastard have, when uttered, an immediate and powerful impact on the context. They are performative, often destructively so. They are revealing of the perspective from which the utterance is made, and they can have a dramatic impact on how current and future utterances are perceived. This, despite the fact that speakers are invariably hard-pressed to articulate what they mean. I develop a general theory of these volatile, indispensable meanings. The theory is built around a class of (...)
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  23. Moral and Semantic Innocence.Christopher Hom & Robert May - 2013 - Analytic Philosophy 54 (3):293-313.
  24. Moral dilemmas.Christopher W. Gowans (ed.) - 1987 - New York: Oxford Uiversity Press.
    The essays in this volume illuminate a central topic in ethical theory: moral dilemmas. Some contemporary philosophers dispute the traditional view that a true moral dilemma -- a situation in which a person has two irreconcilable moral duties -- cannot exist. This collection provides the historical background to the ongoing debate with selections from Kant, Mill, Bradley, and Ross. The best recent work on the question is represented in essays by Donagan, Foot, Hare, Marcus, Nagel, van Fraassen, Williams, and others.
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  25. Pejoratives.Christopher Hom - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (2):164-185.
    The norms surrounding pejorative language, such as racial slurs and swear words, are deeply prohibitive. Pejoratives are typically a means for speakers to express their derogatory attitudes. As these attitudes vary along many dimensions and magnitudes, they initially appear to be resistant to a truth-conditional, semantic analysis. The goal of the paper is to clarify the essential linguistic phenomena surrounding pejoratives, survey the logical space of explanatory theories, evaluate each with respect to the phenomena and provide a preliminary assessment of (...)
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  26. Good News for Moral Error Theorists: A Master Argument Against Companions in Guilt Strategies.Christopher Cowie - 2016 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 94 (1):115-130.
    Moral error theories are often rejected by appeal to ‘companions in guilt’ arguments. The most popular form of companions in guilt argument takes epistemic reasons for belief as a ‘companion’ and proceeds by analogy. I show that this strategy fails. I claim that the companions in guilt theorist must understand epistemic reasons as evidential support relations if her argument is to be dialectically effective. I then present a dilemma. Either epistemic reasons are evidential support relations or they are not. If (...)
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  27.  16
    Book-Reviews.Hugh Upton - 1986 - Mind 95 (379):398-400.
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  28.  4
    Discussions.Hugh Upton - 1987 - Mind 96 (383):381-385.
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  29.  25
    On Applying Moral Theories.Hugh Upton - 1993 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 10 (2):189-199.
    ABSTRACT This paper takes issue with the idea that there is a variety of moral theories available which can in some way usefully be applied to problems in ethics. The idea is reflected in the common view that those favouring a systematic approach would do well to abandon consequentialist thinking and turn to some alternative theory. It is argued here that this is not an option, since each of the usual supposed alternatives lacks the independent resources to meet the minimal (...)
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  30.  17
    Personal identity.Hugh Upton - 2005 - Nursing Philosophy 6 (1):77-79.
  31.  97
    Scarre on Evil Pleasures.Hugh Upton - 2000 - Utilitas 12 (1):97.
    Utilitarianism faces a difficulty in that what are typically regarded as natural goods seem to have possible occurrences that strike most people as morally reprehensible, yet which according to the theory must be taken to add to the good in the world. Thus, totake a recent treatment of the problem by Geoffrey Scarre, it would seem that even sadistic pleasures must contribute to human happiness and thus morally offset the concomitant suffering of the victim. Scarre has offered a defence of (...)
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  32.  10
    Ethics in medicine.H. Upton - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (3):185-185.
    What makes for a good book on ethics in medicine? Given that no one can do another’s moral thinking for them, this much at least: it should stimulate in the reader an inclination to critical reflection that will persist when the book goes back on the shelf. And, since no one can do another’s philosophical thinking for them either, this requirement is doubly true when the basis of the work lies in moral philosophy. In addition, where the book is likely (...)
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  33.  6
    The book of life.Upton Sinclair - 1922 - London,: T. W. Laurie.
    Upton Sinclair, one of America's foremost and most prolific authors, addresses the cultivation of the mind and the body in this 1922 volume. Sinclair's goal was to attempt to tell the reader how to live, how to find health, happiness and success, and how to develop fully both the mind and the body. Part One: The Book of the Mind covers such subjects as faith, reason, morality, and the subconscious. Part Two: The Book of the Body develops such subjects (...)
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  34. Rational risk‐aversion: Good things come to those who weight.Christopher Bottomley & Timothy Luke Williamson - 2023 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 108 (3):697-725.
    No existing normative decision theory adequately handles risk. Expected Utility Theory is overly restrictive in prohibiting a range of reasonable preferences. And theories designed to accommodate such preferences (for example, Buchak's (2013) Risk‐Weighted Expected Utility Theory) violate the Betweenness axiom, which requires that you are indifferent to randomizing over two options between which you are already indifferent. Betweenness has been overlooked by philosophers, and we argue that it is a compelling normative constraint. Furthermore, neither Expected nor Risk‐Weighted Expected Utility Theory (...)
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  35. Between instrumentalism and brain-writing.Christopher Peacocke - 1983 - In Sense and Content. Oxford University Press.
     
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  36. Fallacies and Argument Appraisal.Christopher W. Tindale - 2007 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Fallacies and Argument Appraisal presents an introduction to the nature, identification, and causes of fallacious reasoning, along with key questions for evaluation. Drawing from the latest work on fallacies as well as some of the standard ideas that have remained relevant since Aristotle, Christopher Tindale investigates central cases of major fallacies in order to understand what has gone wrong and how this has occurred. Dispensing with the approach that simply assigns labels and brief descriptions of fallacies, Tindale provides fuller (...)
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  37.  3
    Cos'è Dio per me: un tentativo di porre le basi di una religione razionale.Upton Sinclair - 1949 - Verona,: Casa editrice Europa.
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  38. Gendaijin no seikatsu senjutsu.Upton Sinclair - 1930 - [S. l.: [S.N.].
     
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  39. What God Means to Me.Upton Sinclair - 1936 - New York: Farrar & Rinehart.
  40.  60
    Derrida.Christopher Norris - 1987 - Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
    Discusses Derrida's writings on Plato, Kant, Hegel, Rousseau, Nietzsche, and Freud.
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  41. Presupposition and implicature.Christopher Potts - 1996 - In Shalom Lappin & Chris Fox (eds.), Handbook of Contemporary Semantic Theory. Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  42.  78
    Truth, rationality, and pragmatism: themes from Peirce.Christopher Hookway (ed.) - 2000 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Christopher Hookway presents a series of studies of themes from the work of the great American philosopher and pragmatist, Charles S. Peirce (1839-1913). These themes center on the question of how we are to investigate the world rationally. Hookway shows how Peirce's ideas about this continue to play an important role in contemporary philosophy.
  43.  17
    Three Temples in Libanius and the Theodosian Code.Christopher P. Jones - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (2):860-865.
    In Libanius' speechFor the Temples(Or. 30), sometimes regarded as the crowning work of his career, he refers to an unnamed city in which a great pagan temple had recently been destroyed; the date of the speech is disputed, but must be in the 380 s or early 390 s, near the end of the speaker's life. After deploring the actions of a governor appointed by Theodosius, often identified with the praetorian prefect Maternus Cynegius, Libanius continues (30.44–5):Let no-one think that all (...)
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  44. What is Understanding? An Overview of Recent Debates in Epistemology and Philosophy of Science.Christoph Baumberger, Claus Beisbart & Georg Brun - 2016 - In Stephen Grimm Christoph Baumberger & Sabine Ammon (eds.), Explaining Understanding: New Perspectives from Epistemolgy and Philosophy of Science. Routledge. pp. 1-34.
    The paper provides a systematic overview of recent debates in epistemology and philosophy of science on the nature of understanding. We explain why philosophers have turned their attention to understanding and discuss conditions for “explanatory” understanding of why something is the case and for “objectual” understanding of a whole subject matter. The most debated conditions for these types of understanding roughly resemble the three traditional conditions for knowledge: truth, justification and belief. We discuss prominent views about how to construe these (...)
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  45. Understanding phenomena.Christoph Kelp - unknown
    The literature on the nature of understanding can be divided into two broad camps. Explanationists believe that it is knowledge of explanations that is key to understanding. In contrast, their manipulationist rivals maintain that understanding essentially involves an ability to manipulate certain representations. The aim of this paper is to provide a novel knowledge based account of understanding. More specifically, it proposes an account of maximal understanding of a given phenomenon in terms of fully comprehensive and maximally well-connected knowledge of (...)
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  46. Attention and consciousness.Christopher Mole - 2008 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (4):86-104.
    According to commonsense psychology, one is conscious of everything that one pays attention to, but one does not pay attention to all the things that one is conscious of. Recent lines of research purport to show that commonsense is mistaken on both of these points: Mack and Rock (1998) tell us that attention is necessary for consciousness, while Kentridge and Heywood (2001) claim that consciousness is not necessary for attention. If these lines of research were successful they would have important (...)
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  47. Plato's utopia recast: his later ethics and politics.Christopher Bobonich - 2002 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Plato's Utopia Recast is an illuminating reappraisal of Plato's later works, which reveals radical changes in his ethical and political theory. Christopher Bobonich examines later dialogues, with a special emphasis upon the Laws, and argues that in these late works, Plato both rethinks and revises the basic ethical and poltical positions that he held in his better-known earlier works, such as the Republic. This book will change our understanding of Plato. His controversial moral and political theory, so influential in (...)
  48. Some Varieties of Epistemic Injustice: Reflections on Fricker.Christopher Hookway - 2010 - Episteme 7 (2):151-163.
    Miranda Fricker's important study of epistemic injustice is focussed primarily on testimonial injustice and hermeneutic injustice. It explores how agents' capacities to make assertions and provide testimony can be impaired in ways that can involve forms of distinctively epistemic injustice. My paper identifies a wider range of forms of epistemic injustice that do not all involve the ability to make assertions or offer testimony. The paper considers some examples of some other ways in which injustice can prevent someone from participating (...)
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  49. The Development of Schopenhauer's Philosophy.Christopher Janaway - 1989 - In Self and world in Schopenhauer's philosophy. New York: Oxford University Press.
    Schopenhauer's philosophy was formed during the years 1810–18. This chapter looks at the influences that shaped it, principally Kant, but also Plato, and the Upanishads. Schopenhauer aimed at a synthesis of these influences. Although indebted to Kant for the framework of his thought, he developed a conception of metaphysics and a ‘better consciousness’ of objective reality that would be free from the limitations imposed by Kant. Schopenhauer's antagonistic relationship with Fichte, Schelling, and Hegel is also mentioned.
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  50. Refugees and the Right to Control Immigration.Christopher Heath Wellman - 2021 - In Russ Shafer Landau (ed.), The Ethical Life: Fundamental Readings in Ethics and Moral Problems. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 286-300.
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