Results for 'Christy McConnell Moroye'

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  1.  24
    Aesthetic, Spiritual, and Flow Experiences: Contrasts and Educational Implications.P. Bruce Uhrmacher, Christy McConnell Moroye & Bradley Conrad - 2016 - Education and Culture 32 (1):131.
    The idea for our paper began with a practical problem. As curricularists dedicated to an aesthetic approach to teaching, curriculum, and learning, we regularly provide workshops on this topic for teachers in K–12 schools. Our own work is based on Dewey’s aesthetic ideas1 and we have developed a theory called CRISPA2 that teachers may employ to create what we might call “wow” experiences in their own classrooms.3 That is, they can set up the conditions for students to have aesthetic experiences (...)
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  2.  13
    Experience-Based Objectives.Benjamin C. Ingman & Christy McConnell Moroye - 2019 - Educational Studies 55 (3):346-367.
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  3. Cultivating Curious and Creative Minds: The Role of Teachers and Teacher Educators, Part I.Annette D. Digby, Gadi Alexander, Carole G. Basile, Kevin Cloninger, F. Michael Connelly, Jessica T. DeCuir-Gunby, John P. Gaa, Herbert P. Ginsburg, Angela McNeal Haynes, Ming Fang He, Terri R. Hebert, Sharon Johnson, Patricia L. Marshall, Joan V. Mast, Allison W. McCulloch, Christina Mengert, Christy M. Moroye, F. Richard Olenchak, Wynnetta Scott-Simmons, Merrie Snow, Derrick M. Tennial, P. Bruce Uhrmacher, Shijing Xu & JeongAe You (eds.) - 2010 - R&L Education.
    Presents a plethora of approaches to developing human potential in areas not conventionally addressed. Organized in two parts, this international collection of essays provides viable educational alternatives to those currently holding sway in an era of high-stakes accountability.
     
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  4.  35
    Pragmatics.Sally McConnell-Ginet - 1986 - Philosophical Review 95 (1):123-127.
  5.  51
    Mapping Our Practice? Some Conceptual “Bumps” for Us to Consider.Christy Simpson - 2012 - HEC Forum 24 (3):219-226.
    There are several important conceptual issues and questions about the practice of healthcare ethics that can, and should, inform the development of any practice standards. This paper provides a relatively short overview of seven of these issues, with the invitation for further critical reflection and examination of their relevance to and implications for practice standards. The seven issues described include: diversity (from the perspective of training and experience); moral expertise and authority/influence; being an insider or outsider; flexibility and adaptability (for (...)
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  6.  42
    Inalienable Rights: The Limits of Consent in Medicine and Law.Terrance McConnell - 2000 - Oup Usa.
    McConnell presents the unusual and distinctive argument that inalienable rights differ from other types of rights in that, rather than restraining the behaviour of others, inalienable rights seem to put limits on the possessors themselves, because even the possessor's consent does not justify others in encroaching on them. He offers a full account of what it means for a right to be inalienable, distinguishing them from other kinds of rights in the contexts of moral and political issues in medicine (...)
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  7.  27
    Getting Engaged: Exploring Professionalization in Canada: Introduction to This Issue. [REVIEW]Christy Simpson - 2012 - HEC Forum 24 (3):149-151.
  8. Moral Dilemmas.Terrance McConnell - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  9.  58
    When Hope Makes Us Vulnerable: A Discussion of Patient–Healthcare Provider Interactions in the Context of Hope.Christy Simpson - 2004 - Bioethics 18 (5):428–447.
  10.  27
    Balancing the Duty to Treat with the Duty to Family in the Context of the COVID-19 Pandemic.Doug McConnell - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (6):360-363.
    Healthcare systems around the world are struggling to maintain a sufficient workforce to provide adequate care during the COVID-19 pandemic. Staffing problems have been exacerbated by healthcare workers refusing to work out of concern for their families. I sketch a deontological framework for assessing when it is morally permissible for HCWs to abstain from work to protect their families from infection and when it is a dereliction of duty to patients. I argue that it is morally permissible for HCWs to (...)
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  11.  19
    Legalism, Countertransference, and Clinical Moral Perception.Christy A. Rentmeester & Constance George - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (10):20-28.
    This target article focuses on dynamics that arise in three typical ethically complex cases in which psychiatric consultations are requested by physicians: a dying patient refuses life-prolonging treatment, an uncooperative patient demands to be allowed to go outside and smoke, and an angry patient demands to be admitted to the hospital. The discussion canvasses what is at stake morally and clinically in each of these cases and explores clinician–patient interactions, dynamics in relationships between consulting physicians and consultant psychiatrists, patient transference, (...)
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  12.  23
    Language and Other Abstract Objects. [REVIEW]Sally McConnell-Ginet - 1985 - Philosophical Review 94 (4):590.
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  13.  15
    Public Reason in Justifications of Conscientious Objection in Health Care.Doug McConnell & Robert F. Card - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (5):625-632.
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  14.  54
    Moral Relativity.Terrance McConnell - 1986 - Noûs 20 (4):559-562.
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  15. Moral Dilemmas and Consistency in Ethics.Terrance C. McConnell - 1978 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 8 (2):269 - 287.
    A moral dilemma is a situation in which an agent ought to do each of two actions, Both of which he cannot do. If there are genuine moral dilemmas, The ethical theorist is presented with a problem: he must reject several very plausible principles of standard deontic logic. The main reasons usually given to show that there are moral dilemmas are examined, And it is argued that they are not sufficient. Several positive arguments are then presented, Arguments which try to (...)
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  16.  8
    When Hope Makes Us Vulnerable: A Discussion of Patient–Healthcare Provider Interactions in The.Christy Simpson - 2004 - Bioethics 18 (5):428-447.
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  17. Gratitude.Terrance Mcconnell - 1995 - Ethics 105 (3):657-659.
     
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  18.  9
    Should a Good Healthcare Professional Be (at Least a Little) Callous?Christy A. Rentmeester - 2007 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (1):43 – 64.
    The term "callous" has not, to this point, been studied empirically or considered philosophically in the context of healthcare professionalism. It should be, however, because its uses seem peculiar. Sometimes "callous" is used to suggest that becoming callous confers a benefit of some protection against emotional distress, which might be considered expedient in the healthcare work environment. But, "callous" also refers to a person's unappealing demeanor of hardened insensitivity. The tension between these different moral connotations of "callous" prompts several empirical, (...)
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  19. Narrative Self-Constitution and Recovery From Addiction.Doug McConnell - 2016 - American Philosophical Quarterly 53 (3):307-322.
    Why do some addicted people chronically fail in their goal to recover, while others succeed? On one established view, recovery depends, in part, on efforts of intentional planning agency. This seems right, however, firsthand accounts of addiction suggest that the agent’s self-narrative also has an influence. This paper presents arguments for the view that self-narratives have independent, self-fulfilling momentum that can support or undermine self-governance. The self-narrative structures of addicted persons can entrench addiction and alienate the agent from practically feasible (...)
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  20. Art Concept Pluralism.Christy Mag Uidhir & P. D. Magnus - 2011 - Metaphilosophy 42 (1-2):83-97.
    Abstract: There is a long tradition of trying to analyze art either by providing a definition (essentialism) or by tracing its contours as an indefinable, open concept (anti-essentialism). Both art essentialists and art anti-essentialists share an implicit assumption of art concept monism. This article argues that this assumption is a mistake. Species concept pluralism—a well-explored position in philosophy of biology—provides a model for art concept pluralism. The article explores the conditions under which concept pluralism is appropriate, and argues that they (...)
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  21.  5
    Hope, Fantasy, and Communication in the ICU: Translating Frameworks Into Clinical Practice.Christy L. Cummings - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (1):21-23.
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  22.  37
    Postcolonial Bioethics.Christy A. Rentmeester - 2012 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (3):366-374.
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  23. Meaning and Grammar: An Introduction to Semantics.Gennaro Chierchia & Sally McConnell-Ginet - 2000 - MIT Press.
     
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  24.  57
    How Kant Might Explain Ugliness.Sean McConnell - 2008 - British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (2):205-228.
    A number of recent studies have claimed to explain how Kant can or cannot accommodate pure judgements of ugliness in his aesthetic theory. In this paper I critically review the arguments on each side of the debate and then develop a new account of how Kant might explain the pure judgement of the ugly, namely, by appeal to the quickening of the faculties in their harmonious free play. Some implications and applications of such an explanation are then explored, including a (...)
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  25. Genetic Enhancement, Human Nature, and Rights.T. Mcconnell - 2010 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (4):415-428.
    Authors such as Francis Fukuyama, the President's Council on Bioethics, and George Annas have argued that biotechnological interventions that aim to promote genetic enhancement pose a threat to human nature. This paper clarifies what conclusions these critics seek to establish, and then shows that there is no plausible account of human nature that will meet the conditions necessary to support this position. Appeals to human nature cannot establish a prohibition against the pursuit of genetic enhancement.
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  26.  25
    Conscientious Objection in Healthcare: How Much Discretionary Space Best Supports Good Medicine?Doug McConnell - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (1):154-161.
    Daniel Sulmasy has recently argued that good medicine depends on physicians having a wide discretionary space in which they can act on their consciences. The only constraints Sulmasy believes we should place on physicians’ discretionary space are those defined by a form of tolerance he derives from Locke whereby people can publicly act in accordance with their personal religious and moral beliefs as long as their actions are not destructive to society. Sulmasy also claims that those who would reject physicians’ (...)
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  27.  8
    Compensation and Hazard Pay for Key Workers During an Epidemic: An Argument From Analogy.Doug McConnell & Dominic Wilkinson - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2020-106389.
    The COVID-19 pandemic has created unusually challenging and dangerous workplace conditions for key workers. This has prompted calls for key workers to receive a variety of special benefits over and above their normal pay. Here, we consider whether two such benefits are justified: a no-fault compensation scheme for harm caused by an epidemic and hazard pay for the risks and burdens of working during an epidemic. Both forms of benefit are often made available to members of the armed forces for (...)
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  28. Why Pornography Can't Be Art.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2009 - Philosophy and Literature 33 (1):193-203.
    Claims that pornography cannot be art typically depend on controversial claims about essential value differences (moral, aesthetic) between pornography and art. In this paper, I offer a value-neutral exclusionary claim, showing pornography to be descriptively at odds with art. I then show how my view is an improvement on similar claims made by Jerrold Levinson. Finally I draw parallels between art and pornography and art and advertising as well as show that my view is consistent with our typical usage of (...)
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  29. “Moral Residue and Dilemmas” En Mason, 1996. Ed.Terrance C. McConnell - 1996 - In H. E. Mason (ed.), Moral Dilemmas and Moral Theory. Oxford University Press. pp. 36--47.
     
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  30.  38
    Value Neutrality in Genetic Counseling: An Unattained Ideal.Christy A. Rentmeester - 2001 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (1):47-51.
    Beginning with a discussion of why value neutrality on the part of the genetics counselor does not necessarily preserve autonomy of the counselee, the idea that social values unavoidably underlie the articulation of risks and benefits of genetic testing is made explicit. Despite the best efforts of a counselor to convey value neutral facts, risk assessment by the counselee and family is done according to normative analysis, experience with illness, and definitions of health. Each of these factors must be known (...)
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  31. The Nature and Basis of Inalienable Rights.Terrance McConnell - 1984 - Law and Philosophy 3 (1):25 - 59.
    This paper has two purposes. One is primarily (but not exclusively) conceptual and the other is normative. The first aim is to say what inalienable rights are. To explain this, inalienable rights are contrasted with the notions of forfeitable rights and absolute rights. A recent novel analysis of inalienable rights by Feinberg is explained and criticized. The first task is concluded by discussing what duties inalienable rights imply. The second aim is to see what moral principles, if any, justify designating (...)
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  32.  20
    The Inalienable Right to Withdraw From Research.Terrance McConnell - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (4):840-846.
    Most codes of research ethics and the practice of Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) allow human subjects to withdraw from research at any time. Consent forms invariably make a statement to this effect. So understood, a subject's right to withdraw from research is inalienable; she cannot, through her consent, surrender this right. Recently critics have argued that in selected circumstances the right to withdraw from research is alienable; subjects have the moral authority, through their consent, to obligate themselves not to withdraw. (...)
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  33.  2
    Conscientious Objection in Health Care: Pinning Down the Reasonability View.Doug McConnell - 2021 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 46 (1):37-57.
    Robert Card’s “Reasonability View” is a significant contribution to the debate over the place of conscientious objection in health care. In his view, conscientious objections can only be accommodated if the grounds for the objection meet a reasonability standard. I identify inconsistencies in Card’s description of the reasonability standard and argue that each version he specifies is unsatisfactory. The criteria for reasonability that Card sets out most frequently have no clear underpinning principle and are too permissive of immoral objections. Card (...)
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  34.  19
    Upbeat and Happy: Arousal as an Important Factor in Studying Attention.Meghan M. McConnell & David I. Shore - 2011 - Cognition and Emotion 25 (7):1184-1195.
  35. The Ambiguity About Death in Japan: An Ethical Implication for Organ Procurement.J. R. McConnell - 1999 - Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (4):322-324.
    In the latter half of the twentieth century, developed countries of the world have made tremendous strides in organ donation and transplantation. However, in this area of medicine, Japan has been slow to follow. Japanese ethics, deeply rooted in religion and tradition, have affected their outlook on life and death. Because the Japanese have only recently started to acknowledge the concept of brain death, transplantation of major organs has been hindered in that country. Currently, there is a dual definition of (...)
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  36. Unrealistic Fictions.Allan Hazlett & Christy Mag Uidhir - 2011 - American Philosophical Quarterly 48 (1):33--46.
    In this paper, we develop an analysis of unrealistic fiction that captures the everyday sense of ‘unrealistic’. On our view, unrealistic fictions are a species of inconsistent fictions, but fictions for which such inconsistency, given the supporting role we claim played by genre, needn’t be a critical defect. We first consider and reject an analysis of unrealistic fiction as fiction that depicts or describes unlikely events; we then develop our own account and make an initial statement of it: unrealistic fictions (...)
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  37.  9
    The Inalienable Right to Withdraw From Research.Terrance McConnell - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (4):840-846.
    Consent forms given to potential subjects in research protocols typically contain a sentence like this: “You have a right to withdraw from this study at any time without penalty.” If you have ever served on an institutional review board or a research ethics committee, you have no doubt read such a sentence often. Moreover, codes of ethics governing medical research endorse such a right. For example, paragraph 24 of the Declaration of Helsinki says, “The subject should be informed of the (...)
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  38.  31
    Organizational Ethics and Social Justice in Practice: Choices and Challenges in a Rural-Urban Health Region. [REVIEW]Christy Simpson & Jeff Kirby - 2004 - HEC Forum 16 (4):274-283.
  39.  99
    “‘Ought’ Implies ‘Can’” and the Scope of Moral Requirements.Terrance McConnell - 1989 - Philosophia 19 (4):437-454.
    This paper examines two contexts in ethical theory that some have thought support the claim that attempts, rather than actions, are what are morally required of agents. In each context there is an appeal to the principle that 'ought' implies 'can'. I begin by explaining how I think appeals to this principle typically work. I conclude that not only do the contexts in question not demonstrate that moral requirements range over attempts, but also that any argument in support of that (...)
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  40.  45
    Social Sustainability, Farm Labor, and Organic Agriculture: Findings From an Exploratory Analysis. [REVIEW]Aimee Shreck, Christy Getz & Gail Feenstra - 2006 - Agriculture and Human Values 23 (4):439-449.
    Much of the attention by social scientists to the rapidly growing organic agriculture sector focuses on the benefits it provides to consumers (in the form of pesticide-free foods) and to farmers (in the form of price premiums). By contrast, there has been little discussion or research about the implications of the boom in organic agriculture for farmworkers on organic farms. In this paper, we ask the question: From the perspective of organic farmers, does “certified organic” agriculture encompass a commitment to (...)
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  41.  21
    Power, Status and Expectations: How Narcissism Manifests Among Women CEOs.Alicia R. Ingersoll, Christy Glass, Alison Cook & Kari Joseph Olsen - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 158 (4):893-907.
    Firms face mounting pressure to appoint ethical leaders who will avoid unnecessary risk, scandal and crisis. Alongside mounting evidence that narcissistic leaders place organizations at risk, there is a growing consensus that women are more ethical, transparent and risk-averse than men. We seek to interrogate these claims by analyzing whether narcissism is as prevalent among women CEOs as it is among men CEOs. We further analyze whether narcissistic women CEOs take the same types of risk as narcissistic men CEOs. Drawing (...)
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  42.  8
    Res Cogitans: An Essay in Rational Psychology.Sally McConnell-Ginet - 1976 - Philosophical Review 85 (2):216.
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  43.  46
    Objectivity and Moral Expertise.Terrance C. McConnell - 1984 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 14 (2):193 - 216.
    Recently a well-known magazine published an article entitled ‘Moral Specialist.’ This article recounts the activities of Russell McIntyre, described by the authors as a theologian and philosopher who specializes in bioethics. McIntyre is routinely consulted by physicians for help in solving ethical problems. He is asked for moral advice on such matters as abortion, euthanasia, and sterilization for teenagers. McIntyre even wears an electronic ‘beeper’ so that when untimely moral quandaries arise he can easily be reached. McIntyre says that ultimately (...)
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  44.  94
    In Defense of the Knowledge Argument.Jeff Mcconnell - 1994 - Philosophical Topics 22 (1-2):157-187.
  45.  14
    What's Legal? What's Moral? What's the Difference? A Guide for Teaching Residents.Christy A. Rentmeester - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (4):31 – 33.
  46.  42
    Gratitude, Rights, and Moral Standouts.Terrance McConnell - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (2):279-293.
    Many maintain that if a beneficiary has a right to a benefit provided by his benefactor, then the former cannot owe the latter gratitude for that benefit. In this paper I argue against that view. I provide examples in which benefactors provide others with benefits to which they have a right even though most others are denying them that right. These benefactors are moral standouts; they do what is right when most similarly situated agents fail to do so. I then (...)
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  47. The Epicurean Virtue of ΜΕΓΑΛΟΨΥΧΙΑ.Sean McConnell - 2017 - Classical Philology 112:175–199.
  48.  18
    Challenges for Health Regions—Meeting Both Rural and Urban Ethics Needs: A Canadian Perspective.Christy Simpson - 2004 - HEC Forum 16 (4):219-221.
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  49.  19
    Do Proposed Facial Expressions of Contempt, Shame, Embarrassment, and Compassion Communicate the Predicted Emotion?Sherri C. Widen, Anita M. Christy, Kristen Hewett & James A. Russell - 2011 - Cognition and Emotion 25 (5):898-906.
  50.  5
    Counselling Variation Among Physicians Regarding Intestinal Transplant for Short Bowel Syndrome.Christy L. Cummings, Karen A. Diefenbach & Mark R. Mercurio - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (10):665-670.
    Background Intestinal transplant in infants with severe short bowel syndrome (SBS) is an emerging therapy, yet without sufficient long-term data or established guidelines, resulting in possible variation in practice. Objectives To assess current attitudes and counselling practices among physicians regarding intestinal transplant in infants with SBS, and to determine whether counselling and management vary between subspecialists or centres. Methods A national sample of practicing paediatric surgeons and neonatologists was surveyed via the American Academy of Paediatrics listserves. Results were analysed by (...)
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