Results for 'Chrysippus'

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  1. Chrysippus' Dog as a Case Study in Non-Linguistic Cognition.Michael Rescorla - 2009 - In Robert W. Lurz (ed.), The Philosophy of Animal Minds. Cambridge University Press. pp. 52--71.
    I critique an ancient argument for the possibility of non-linguistic deductive inference. The argument, attributed to Chrysippus, describes a dog whose behavior supposedly reflects disjunctive syllogistic reasoning. Drawing on contemporary robotics, I urge that we can equally well explain the dog's behavior by citing probabilistic reasoning over cognitive maps. I then critique various experimentally-based arguments from scientific psychology that echo Chrysippus's anecdotal presentation.
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  2.  30
    Chrysippuson Affections: Reconstruction and Interpretation.Teun Tieleman (ed.) - 2003 - Brill.
    This book reconstructs and interprets the theory of the emotions as expounded by the Stoic philosopher Chrysippus in his 'On Affections', only fragments of which remain. Given its contextual approach, sources such as Galen and Cicero receive ample attention.
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  3.  10
    Chrysippus on Imagination in Aetius 4.12.Pavle Stojanović - 2020 - Classical Quarterly 70 (1):332-346.
    According to Diogenes Laertius, the concept of ‘appearance’ played a central role in Stoic philosophy. As staunch corporealists, the Stoics believed that appearances are physical structures in our corporeal soul which provide the foundation for all our thoughts. One of the crucial features of appearance is that it is a representational mental state that has the ability to provide us with accurate awareness of the world through causal interaction between our senses and external objects, and thus supply the means for (...)
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  4.  30
    The Philosophy of Chrysippus.J. B. Gould - 1970 - Leiden: Brill.
    The Philosophy of Chrysippus is a reconstruction of the philosophy of an eminent Stoic philosopher, based upon the fragmentary remains of his voluminous writings. Chrysippus of Cilicia, who lived in a period that covers roughly the last three-quarters of the third century B.C., studied philosophy in Athens and upon Cleanthes’ death became the third head of the Stoa, one of the four great schools of philosophy of the Hellenistic period. Chrysippus wrote a number of treatises in each (...)
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  5. Chrysippus and the Epistemic Theory of Vagueness.Susanne Bobzien - 2002 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 102 (1):217-238.
    ABSTRACT: Recently a bold and admirable interpretation of Chrysippus’ position on the Sorites has been presented, suggesting that Chrysippus offered a solution to the Sorites by (i) taking an epistemicist position1 which (ii) made allowances for higher-order vagueness. In this paper I argue (i) that Chrysippus did not take an epistemicist position, but − if any − a non-epistemic one which denies truth-values to some cases in a Sorites-series, and (ii) that it is uncertain whether and how (...)
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  6. Chrysippus' Theory of Causes.Susanne Bobzien - 1999 - In Katerina Ierodiakonou (ed.), Topics in Stoic Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    ABSTRACT: A systematic reconstruction of Chrysippus’ theory of causes, grounded on the Stoic tenets that causes are bodies, that they are relative, and that all causation can ultimately be traced back to the one ‘active principle’ which pervades all things. I argue that Chrysippus neither developed a finished taxonomy of causes, nor intended to do so, and that he did not have a set of technical terms for mutually exclusive classes of causes. Rather, the various adjectives which he (...)
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  7.  76
    Did Chrysippus Understand Medea?Christopher Gill - 1983 - Phronesis 28 (2):136-149.
  8. Chrysippus' Modal Logic and Its Relation to Philo and Diodorus.Susanne Bobzien - 1993 - In K. Doering & Th Ebert (eds.), Dialektiker und Stoiker. Franz Steiner. pp. 63--84.
    ABSTRACT: The modal systems of the Stoic logician Chrysippus and the two Hellenistic logicians Philo and Diodorus Cronus have survived in a fragmentary state in several sources. From these it is clear that Chrysippus was acquainted with Philo’s and Diodorus’ modal notions, and also that he developed his own in contrast of Diodorus’ and in some way incorporated Philo’s. The goal of this paper is to reconstruct the three modal systems, including their modal definitions and modal theorems, and (...)
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  9.  9
    Chrysippus’ Indemonstrables and the Semantic Mental Models.Miguel López-Astorga - 2017 - Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 26:302-325.
    Resumen Atendiendo a la lógica estándar, solo uno de los cinco indemostrables propuestos por Crisipo de Solos es realmente indemostrable. Sus otros cuatro esquemas son demostrables en tal lógica. La pregunta, por tanto, es: si cuatro de ellos no son verdaderamente indemostrables, por qué Crisipo consideró que sí lo eran. López-Astorga mostró que si ignoramos el cálculo proposicional estándar y asumimos que una teoría cognitiva contemporánea, la teoría de la lógica mental, describe correctamente el razonamiento humano, se puede entender por (...)
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  10.  87
    Chrysippus's Response to Diodorus's Master Argument.Harry Ide - 1992 - History and Philosophy of Logic 13 (2):133-148.
    Chrysippus claims that some propositions perish. including some true conditionals whose consequent is impossible and antecedent is possible, to which he appeals against Diodorus?s Master Argument. On the standard interpretation. perished propositions lack truth values. and these conditionals are true at the same time as their antecedents arc possible and consequents impossible. But perished propositions are false, and Chrysippus?s conditionals are true when their antecedent and consequent arc possible, and false when their antecedent is possible and consequent impossible. (...)
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  11.  48
    Chrysippus Confronts the Liar: The Case for Stoic Cassationism.Michael Papazian - 2012 - History and Philosophy of Logic 33 (3):197-214.
    The Stoic philosopher Chrysippus wrote extensively on the liar paradox, but unfortunately the extant testimony on his response to the paradox is meager and mainly hostile. Modern scholars, beginning with Alexander Rüstow in the first decade of the twentieth century, have attempted to reconstruct Chrysippus? solution. Rüstow argued that Chrysippus advanced a cassationist solution, that is, one in which sentences such as ?I am speaking falsely? do not express propositions. Two more recent scholars, Walter Cavini and Mario (...)
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  12.  99
    The Chrysippus Intuition and Contextual Theories of Truth.Jay Newhard - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 142 (3):345-352.
    Contextual theories of truth are motivated primarily by the resolution they provide to paradoxical reasoning about truth. The principal argument for contextual theories of truth relies on a key intuition about the truth value of the proposition expressed by a particular utterance made during paradoxical reasoning, which Anil Gupta calls “the Chrysippus intuition.” In this paper, I argue that the principal argument for contextual theories of truth is circular, and that the Chrysippus intuition is false. I conclude that (...)
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  13.  44
    Chrysippus on Mathematical Objects.David G. Robertson - 2004 - Ancient Philosophy 24 (1):169-191.
  14.  38
    Chrysippus: On the Criteria for the Truth of a Conditional Proposition.Josiah B. Gould - 1967 - Phronesis 12 (1):152-161.
  15.  26
    Chrysippus and the Destruction of Propositions: A Defence of the Standard Interpretation.Michael B. Papazian - 2001 - History and Philosophy of Logic 22 (1):1-12.
    One of the most intriguing claims of Stoic logic is Chrysippus's denial of the modal principle that the impossible does not follow from the possible. Chrysippus's argument against this principle involves the idea that some propositions are ?destroyed? or ?perish?. According to the standard interpretation of Chrysippus's argument, propositions cease to exist when they are destroyed. Ide has presented an alternative interpretation according to which destroyed propositions persist after destruction and are false. I argue that Ide's alternative (...)
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  16.  10
    Chrysippus’ Counterargument Against the Master Argument: A Reappraisal.Mauro Nasti De Vincentis - 2018 - SATS 19 (2):139-159.
    Journal Name: SATS Issue: Ahead of print.
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  17. Chrysippus on Extension and the Void.B. Inwood - 1991 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 45 (178):245-266.
     
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  18.  16
    Chrysippus' Solution to the Democritean Dilemma of the Cone.David E. Hahm - 1972 - Isis 63 (2):205-220.
  19.  4
    Chrysippus on Infinite Divisibility.Robert B. Todd - 1973 - Apeiron 7 (1):21.
  20.  1
    Galen and Chrysippus on the Soul: Argument and Refutation in the De Placitis, Books Ii-Iii.Teun Tieleman (ed.) - 1996 - E.J. Brill.
    In this work, new light is thrown on the philosophical method of the great Stoic Chrysippus on the basis of the fragments preserved by Galen in his De Placitis books II-III. Included is a study of Galen's aims and methodologies.
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  21.  45
    Stoic Virtues: Chrysippus and the Religious Character of Stoic Ethics.Christoph Jedan - 2009 - Continuum.
    The book argues that the theological motifs in Stoic philosophy are pivotal to our understanding of Stoic ethics. Part One offers an introductory overview of the religious world view of the Stoics. Part Two examines the Stoic characterizations of virtue and the virtues. Part Three deals with Stoic theories of how human beings can become virtuous. Part Four studies the practices of Stoic ethics. It shows inter alia how the Chrysippean table of virtues is still an (unacknowledged) influence behind Panaetius’ (...)
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  22.  27
    Chrysippus on Nature and Soul in Animals.Anna Eunyoung Ju - 2007 - Classical Quarterly 57 (01):97-.
  23.  19
    Chrysippus' Definition of Cause in Arius Didymus.Jaap Mansfeld - 2001 - Elenchos 22 (1):99-110.
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  24.  13
    Chrysippus on Infinite Divisibility (Diogenes Laertius VII. 150).Robert B. Todd - 1973 - Apeiron 7 (1):21 - 29.
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  25.  10
    Chrysippus on Retribution and Rehabilitation.Paulo Fernando Tadeu Ferreira - 2013 - Doispontos 10 (2):109-34.
    The present article argues that Chrysippus' reply to the objection that Fate does away with that which is up to us (and therefore with justice in honor and punishments) consists in shifting the notion of that which is up to us from one in terms of ultimate origination to one in terms of self-sufficient causation—and thus in shifting the very notion of justice in honor and punishments from one in retributive terms to one in rehabilitative terms.
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  26. Chrysippus' Puzzle About Identity.John Bowin - 2003 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 24:239-251.
    In 'Chrysippus' Puzzle about Identity', John Bowin (thereafter JB) cogently strengthens David Sedley's reading of the puzzle of Chrysippus as a reductio ad absurdum of the Growing Argument. For Sedley, Chrysippus reduces to absurdity the assumption that matter is the sole principle of identity by refuting its presupposition that the two protagonists of the puzzle, namely Theon and Dion, are related as part to the whole. According to Plutarch's Comm. not. 1083 a8-c1, however, the Growing Argument concludes (...)
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  27.  5
    The Philosophy of Chrysippus.Gerard Watson - 1972 - Philosophical Quarterly 22 (88):268-269.
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  28.  22
    Chrysippus and the Placita.Jaap Mansfeld - 1989 - Phronesis 34 (1):311-342.
  29.  91
    Scepticism and Animal Rationality: The Fortune of Chrysippus' Dog in the History of Western Thought.Luciano Floridi - 1997 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 79 (1):27-57.
    This paper employs the metaphor of hunting to discuss intellectual investigation. Drawing on the example of Chrysippus’ dog, an animal whose behaviour supposedly reflects disjunctive syllogistic reasoning, the article traces the history of thought. It concludes by summarizing the contribution of Chrysippus’ dog to the fields of literature, philosophy and the visual arts. -/- .
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  30. Aristotle and Chrysippus on the Psychology of Human Action: Criteria for Responsibility.Priscilla K. Sakezles - 2007 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):225 – 252.
    This Article doDespite obvious differences in the Aristotelian and Stoic theories of responsibility, there is surprisingly a deeper structural similarity between the two. The most obvious difference is that Aristotle is (apparently) a libertarian and the Stoics are determinists. Aristotle holds adults responsible for all our "voluntary" actions, which are defined by two criteria: the "origin" or cause of the action must be "in us" and we must be aware of what we are doing. An "involuntary" action, for which we (...)
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  31. Œuvre Philosophique.Chrysippus - 2004 - Belles Lettres.
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  32.  7
    Reconstructing Chrysippus’ Cosmological Hypothesis. On Plut. Stoic. Rep. 1054c–D.Michele Alessandrelli - 2019 - Elenchos 40 (1):67-98.
    Two literal quotations from Chrysippus’ On Possibles, preserved in Plutarch’s On the Contradictions of the Stoics, seem to contradict the Stoic thesis of the isotropy of the void. According to this thesis the void is an infinite undifferentiated expanse whose center is marked by, and coincides with, the position of the world. Since there is nothing else outside the world, the cohesive force that pervades it is sufficient on its own to guarantee the quasi–indestructibility of the trans–cyclical διακόσμησις and (...)
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  33.  7
    Chrysippus on P. 9» C/Top/Iysical Causality.David Sedley - 1993 - In Jacques Brunschwig & Martha Craven Nussbaum (eds.), Passions & Perceptions: Studies in Hellenistic Philosophy of Mind: Proceedings of the Fifth Symposium Hellenisticum. Cambridge University Press. pp. 2--313.
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  34.  38
    Chrysippus on Virtuous Abstention From Ugly Old Women (Plutarch, Sr 1038E–1039A).Keimpe Algra - 1990 - Classical Quarterly 40 (02):450-.
    Plutarch, at De Stoicorum repugnantiis 1038e–1039a , quotes and briefly discusses a fragment from Chrysippus' On Zeus . This quotation is to some extent paralleled by the scrap, taken from Chrysippus' On the Gods , which immediately follows at SR 1039a . Both quotations are again referred to by Plutarch at De communibus notitiis 1061a . Although the correct constitution of the text is controversial, it is at least clear that the fragment from the On Zeus deals with (...)
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  35.  8
    Chrysippus on Virtuous Abstention From Ugly Old Women.Keimpe Algra - 1990 - Classical Quarterly 40 (2):450-458.
    Plutarch, at De Stoicorum repugnantiis 1038e–1039a, quotes and briefly discusses a fragment from Chrysippus' On Zeus. This quotation is to some extent paralleled by the scrap, taken from Chrysippus' On the Gods, which immediately follows at SR 1039a. Both quotations are again referred to by Plutarch at De communibus notitiis 1061a. Although the correct constitution of the text is controversial, it is at least clear that the fragment from the On Zeus deals with the fact that not all (...)
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  36. Chrysippus.Author unknown - 2001 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
     
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  37. Chrysippus on Physical Elements.John M. Cooper - 2009 - In Ricardo Salles (ed.), God and Cosmos in Stoicism. Oxford University Press.
     
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  38.  18
    Chrysippus on Achilles: The Evidence of Galen de Placitis Hippocratis Et Platonis 4.6–7.Helen Cullyer - 2008 - Classical Quarterly 58 (2):537-.
  39.  15
    Aristotle and Chrysippus on the Physiology of Human Action.Priscilla K. Sakezles - 1998 - Apeiron 31 (2):127 - 165.
  40. Chrysippus' Solution to the Democritean Dilemma of the Cone.David Hahm - 1972 - Isis 63:205-220.
     
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  41. Chrysippus.Jeremy Kirby - 2011 - In James Fieser & Bradley Dowden (eds.), Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  42.  36
    Galen & Chrysippus on the Soul: Argument and Refutation in the De Placitis, Books II-III. [REVIEW]Gretchen J. Reydams-Schils - 2004 - Ancient Philosophy 24 (2):510-519.
  43.  35
    Chrysippus on Psychology T. Tieleman: Chrysippus' On Affections. Reconstruction and Interpretation . (Philosophia Antiqua 94.) Pp. Xii + 346. Leiden: Brill, 2003. Cased. ISBN: 90-04-12998-. [REVIEW]Christopher Gill - 2005 - The Classical Review 55 (02):449-.
  44.  4
    Chrysippus on Psychology. [REVIEW]Christopher Gill - 2005 - The Classical Review 55 (2):449-450.
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  45.  25
    Chrysippus’s Elemental Theory.Ian Hensley - 2017 - Ancient Philosophy 37 (2):361-385.
  46.  13
    Chrysippus' Dog as a Case Study In.M. Iehael Reseorla - 2009 - In Robert W. Lurz (ed.), The Philosophy of Animal Minds. Cambridge University Press.
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  47.  18
    Chrysippus.A. A. Long - 1973 - The Classical Review 23 (02):214-.
  48.  3
    Chrysippus[REVIEW]A. A. Long - 1973 - The Classical Review 23 (2):214-216.
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  49.  35
    Chrysippus Josiah B. Gould: The Philosophy of Chrysippus. (Philosophia Antiqua, Xvii.) Pp. Vi+222. Leiden: Brill, 1970. Paper, Fl. 32. [REVIEW]A. A. Long - 1973 - The Classical Review 23 (02):214-216.
  50. Chrysippus' Puzzle About Identity.John Bowin - 2003 - In David Sedley (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy, Volume Xxiv: Summer 2003. Oxford University Press.
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