31 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Cindy Holder [30]Cindy L. Holder [1]
See also
Cindy Holder
University of Victoria
  1. Who’s Sorry Now? Government Apologies, Truth Commissions, and Indigenous Self-Determination in Australia, Canada, Guatemala, and Peru.Jeff Corntassel & Cindy Holder - 2008 - Human Rights Review 9 (4):465-489.
    Official apologies and truth commissions are increasingly utilized as mechanisms to address human rights abuses. Both are intended to transform inter-group relations by marking an end point to a history of wrongdoing and providing the means for political and social relations to move beyond that history. However, state-dominated reconciliation mechanisms are inherently problematic for indigenous communities. In this paper, we examine the use of apologies, and truth and reconciliation commissions in four countries with significant indigenous populations: Canada, Australia, Peru, and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  2.  9
    Indigenous Peoples and Multicultural Citizenship: Bridging the Gap Between Collective and Individual Rights.Cindy Holder & Jeff Corntassel - 2002 - Human Rights Quarterly 1 (24 126-151):126-151.
    In what follows we present group rights as portrayed in contemporary theoretical debates; compare this portrayal with some of the claims actually advanced by various indigenous groups throughout the world; and give reasons for preferring the practical to the theoretical treatments. Our findings suggest that liberal-individualist and corporatist accounts of group rights actually agree on the kind of importance that group interests have for persons and on what it is that groups who claim rights are concerned about. Both liberal-individualists and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3.  38
    Devolving Power to Sub-State Groups: Some Worries About the Worries.Cindy Holder - 2012 - The Monist 95 (1):86-102.
    We live in a world of states: a world in which the dominant form of “persisting structure” for the wielding of political power is characterized by territorially concentrated power exercised through political institutions that exert sovereign control in the sense of being able to exclusively command compliance. Within such a world, calls for reorganization of the way these institutions are organized so as to devolve power to groups oppressed or marginalized within existing structures are inevitable. However, for proponents of liberal (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  8
    Whose Wrong Is It Anyway? Reflecting on the Public-Ness of Public Apologies.Cindy Holder - 2017 - C4E Journal: Perspectives on Ethics.
    Who constitutes the public on whose behalf such an official speaks and in whose name the apology is offered? In this paper I argue that in most cases, the “public” that the official offering an apology represents and on whose behalf the apology is offered is not the general public but the public sector: those who direct, control and populate the apparatus of the state. I argue that in most cases there is not a plausible model according to which public (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  26
    Self-Determination as a Basic Human Right: The Draft UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.Cindy Holder - 2005 - In Avigail Eisenberg & Jeff Spinner-Halev (eds.), Minorities Within Minorities: Equality, Rights and Diversity. Cambridge University Press. pp. 294.
    Conventional wisdom suggests that promoting self-determination for peoples and protecting the human rights of individuals are competing priorities. By this is meant that securing individuals in their human rights requires limits on the rights of their peoples, and vice versa. In contrast, the Draft UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (the Draft Declaration) treats the two as not only mutually supporting but mutually necessary. In the Draft Declaration, the right of peoples to self-determination is more than a principle (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6.  3
    Are Patriarchal Cultures Really a Problem? Rethinking Objections From Cultural Viciousness.Cindy Holder - 2002 - Journal of Contemporary Legal Issues 12:727-757.
    It seems undeniable that some cultures encourage individuals to act in ways that harm others, and/or to believe that there is nothing wrong when another acts in a way that harms them. And when this is the case it also seems undeniable that it would be better if the scope for such cultures to guide individuals' decision-making were minimized or even eliminated. From these observations a number of people have inferred that groups which exhibit bad cultures ought not to be (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  3
    Culture as an Activity and Human Right: An Important Advance for Indigenous Peoples and International Law.Cindy Holder - 2008 - Alternatives 33:7-28.
    Historically, culture has been treated as an object in international documents. One consequence of this is that cultural rights in international law have been understood as rights of access and consumption. Recently, an alternative conception of culture, and of what cultural rights protect, has emerged from international documents treating indigenous peoples. Within these documents culture is treated as an activity rather than a good. This activity is ascribed to peoples as well as persons, and protecting the capacity of both peoples (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  3
    Debating the Danish Cartoons: Civil Rights or Civil Power?Cindy Holder - 2006 - UNB Law Journal 55:179-185..
    The controversy that accompanied the publication and reprinting of cartoons depicting the Prophet Muhammed as part of a 2005 editorial in the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten has been widely interpreted as yet another illustration of an ineliminable tension between multiculturalism and liberalism. Such an interpretation would have us believe that what is at issue in defending the cartoons is our commitment to civil liberties as a mainstay of liberal democracy. But is this really what is at issue? A closer examination suggests (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  52
    Justice, Cosmopolitanism and Policy Prescription: Gillian Brock’s "Global Justice".Cindy Holder - 2012 - Diametros 31:138-145.
    In Global Justice: A Cosmopolitan Account Gillian Brock makes three important claims: that we have duties of justice to all human beings and not only those with whom we share a state; that our duties to those outside our states are of the same scope and normative weight as our duties to those with whom we share a state; and that the existing framework of international institutions affords us a number of straightforward and accessible means to act on our duties (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Culture as a Basic Human Right.Cindy Holder - 2006 - In Diversity and Equality: The Changing Framework of Freedom in Canada. Vancouver, BC, Canada: pp. 124-154..
    Most political philosophers are reluctant to treat cultural rights as basic. Instead, the predominant view is that cultural interests are only important derivatively, in virtue of their contribution to some other interest. In this chapter I argue that political philosophers ought to follow international human rights norms regarding the importance of culture. Not only do international human rights courts and committees come to the right conclusion about the significance of culture, but, as importantly, they come to this conclusion because they (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Comments on Robert Card's "Gender, Justice Within the Family, and the Commitments of Liberalism".Cindy Holder - 2011 - In Adrianne Leigh McEvoy (ed.), Sex, Love, and Friendship: Studies of the Society for the Philosophy of Sex and Love: 1993-2003. Rodopi. pp. 211-216.
    Robert Card argues that although Susan Okin’s analysis in Justice, Gender and the Family leads to the conclusion that justice within the family requires elimination of gendered roles within marriage, this conclusion is not compatible with a conception of justice in which neutrality between reasonable conceptions of the good, and protection of individuals’ contractual capabilities are taken to be fundamental values. Although Card is right that there is tension in Okin’s work between where the analysis of injustice within the gender-structured (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Human Rights. The Hard Questions, Cambridge University Press.Cindy Holder & David Reidy (eds.) - 2013
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  5
    Human Rights: The Hard Questions.Cindy Holder & David Reidy (eds.) - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    The United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948. A burgeoning human rights movement followed, yielding many treaties and new international institutions and shaping the constitutions and laws of many states. Yet human rights continue to be contested politically and legally and there is substantial philosophical and theoretical debate over their foundations and implications. In this volume, distinguished philosophers, political scientists, international lawyers, environmentalists and anthropologists discuss some of the most difficult questions of human rights (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Justification.Cindy Holder - 2012 - In Antonella Besussi (ed.), A Companion to Political Philosophy: Methods, Tools, Topics. pp. 99-110.
    In political philosophy and political theory justification is an important element of normative force – of rightful pull to compliance. To justify is to address a subject in a form or with a substantive content in virtue of which the subject is supposed to be bound. Theories of justification spell out how addresses are supposed to establish subjects as rightfully bound. All arguments that purport to establish that a practice, institution, requirement or legal regime rightfully exerts a pull to compliance (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Justice and Foreign Policy, Michael Blake, Oxford University Press: Oxford, 2013. [REVIEW]Cindy Holder - 2015 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews, 2015:2015.06.09.
    Review of Justice and Foreign Policy, Michael Blake, Oxford University Press: Oxford, 2013.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  2
    Rethinking Groups: Groups, Group Membership and Group Rights.Cindy L. Holder - 2001 - Dissertation, The University of Arizona
    Is there something special about group rights? Many would say "yes". For some, only certain kinds of groups---ones that are oppressed, or play a special role in well-being---may have rights. For others, the kind of group is not as important as the group's culture and internal structure. At the very least, many argue, group rights ought to be more restricted than individualistic ones. For these reasons, arguing the merits of a group right is often thought to require a theory of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Reasoning Like a State: Integration and the Limits of State Regret.Cindy Holder - 2014 - In Mihaela Mihai & Mathias Thaler (eds.), The Uses and Abuses of Apology. pp. 203-219.
    Are there wrongs for which states cannot apologise? In this chapter, I argue that the answer is 'Yes'. I begin with the simple observation that reasoning as a state official requires a conception of what officials do, and so a conception of what is - and is not - properly undertaken on behalf of the state. To act as an official, then, requires a theory of what happens in a well functioning state: it requires a 'normative theory of the state. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Truthfulness in Transition: The Value of Insisting on Experiential Adequacy.Cindy Holder - 2013 - In Larry May & Elizabeth Edenberg (eds.), Jus Post Bellum and Transitional Justice. pp. 244-261.
    It has come to be widely accepted that jus post bellum includes responsibilities to rebuild. Consequently, duties to establish a sustainable peace are increasingly defined in terms of duties to protect and promote international human rights, including duties to effectively investigate human rights violations, to ensure access to effective remedy, and to transform institutional and legal contexts that have facilitated or sustained human abuse. But what are investigations by transitional bodies seeking when they take on these tasks? Often, investigators present (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Human Rights: The Hard Questions.David Reidy & Cindy Holder (eds.) - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    The United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948. A burgeoning human rights movement followed, yielding many treaties and new international institutions and shaping the constitutions and laws of many states. Yet human rights continue to be contested politically and legally and there is substantial philosophical and theoretical debate over their foundations and implications. In this volume distinguished philosophers, political scientists, international lawyers, environmentalists and anthropologists discuss some of the most difficult questions of human rights (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  46
    Self-Determination as a Universal Human Right.Cindy Holder - 2006 - Human Rights Review 7 (4):5-18.
    Conventional wisdom suggests that promoting self-determination for peoples and protecting the human rights of individuals are competing priorities. However, many recent international human rights documents include rights of peoples in their lists of basic human rights. In this paper, I defend including at least one people’s right, the right to self-determination, in the list of basic rights. Recognizing that self-determination is a constitutive element of human dignity casts state sovereignty in a different light, with interesting consequences both for international law (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21. Global Justice Beyond Distribution: Poverty and Natural Resources.Cindy Holder - 2012 - Public Affairs Quarterly 26 (1):33-45.
    Chronic poverty comes in a variety of forms. It is multi-dimensional in its causes and multi-dimensional in its impacts . Although poverty "has an irreducible economic connotation," this connotation "does not necessarily imply the primacy of economic factors" . For example, violent conflict, access to land, and social relations of power are among the most important factors in food security . Integration into global economic markets is as likely to be a source of immiseration and impoverishment as it is a (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  1
    Human Rights Without Hierarchy: Why Theories of Global Justice Should Embrace the Indivisibility Principle.Cindy Holder - 2020 - In Johnny Antonio Davilà (ed.), Cuestiones de justicia global. Valencia: pp. 125-150.
    International human rights concepts and documents figure prominently within theories of global justice. Appeals to human rights often rely on theories and interpretations that rank human rights in relation to one another designating some as more important or more crucial than others such that they may or must be given priority. In this paper I argue that hierarchical ranking of human rights should be rejected by theorists of global justice because such ranking: (a) undermines the effectiveness with which human rights (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Responding to Humanitarian Crises.Cindy Holder - 2008 - In Larry May & Emily Crookston (eds.), War: Essays in Political Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 85-104.
    Everyone agrees that the international community must develop better mechanisms for responding to humanitarian crises. The best mechanism for responding is simply to intervene to prevent a crisis from developing in the first place. However, because the principle of sovereignty imposes strict constraints on action across state borders, international actors are often unwilling or unable to interpose themselves until after conditions have escalated into a full-blown crisis, by which time it has usually become a matter of managing human misery rather (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  32
    Groups, Rights, and Methodological Individualism: In Defense of Collectivist Rights.Cindy Holder - 2000 - Social Philosophy Today 15:305-320.
    Theories that recognize group rights face an important challenge from both friends of rights and friends of groups: that rights discourse cannot accord priority to the needs of group life over those of any individual person because the theory of moral value which underwrites rights language cannot recognize groups as having oveniding interests or importance. The full import of this objection has often been missed by those against whom it is levelled because they focus on claims by groups against non-group (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  19
    How Diasporic Peoples Maintain Their Identity in Multicultural Societies: Chinese, Africans, Jews, by Norman Vasu. Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen Press, 2008. Pp. Iii + 273. ISBN 13: 978-0-7734-4896-4; ISBN 10: 0-7734-4896-9. $109.05. [REVIEW]Cindy Holder - 2010 - Kantian Review 15 (2):160-161.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  13
    Commentary on Will Kymlicka’s Multicultural Odysseys.Cindy Holder - 2009 - Social Philosophy Today 25:265-270.
    Multicultural Odysseys by Will Kymlicka is a textbook example of how to effectively integrate empirical research and philosophical analysis. In it Kymlicka offers a measured and scrupulously honest assessment of what he takes to be both the potential and the limits of liberal multiculturalism as a model for democratization, seeking not to defend his views on multiculturalism in so much as try to understand them. In particular, he seeks to understand how his views on multiculturalism can be correct in the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  10
    Groups, Rights, and Methodological Individualism: In Defense of Collectivist Rights.Cindy Holder - 2000 - Social Philosophy Today 15:305-320.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  12
    Transition, Trust and Partial Legality: On Colleen Murphy’s A Moral Theory of Political Reconciliation.Cindy Holder - 2016 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 10 (1):153-164.
    In A Moral Theory of Political Reconciliation Colleen Murphy develops a rich and potentially transformative account of political reconciliation. The potential of this account is not fully realized because of limitations in how Murphy conceptualizes political relationships. For example, group-differentiated integration into states opens up important questions about partial legality and group-differentiated experiences of repression that Murphy does not address. Murphy’s framework is well-suited to take up these questions, once they are acknowledged. But doing so requires a revised understanding of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  34
    Rethinking Political Justification.Cindy Holder - 2004 - Journal of Value Inquiry 38 (4):511-529.
    A popular strategy for answering the question of why and how laws bind is to use the concept of political justification: to argue that laws bind when they can be justified in the political domain. Being defensible in the political domain is supposed to make laws emotionally compelling in virtue of their being justified for each member of the community, and intellectually compelling in virtue of their having emerged from a process that is subject to constraints of rationality such as (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30.  5
    Lomasky, Loren E., and Tesón, Fernando R. Justice at a Distance: Extending Freedom Globally.New York: Cambridge University Press, 2015. Pp. 285. $103.00 ; $33.99. [REVIEW]Cindy Holder - 2017 - Ethics 127 (3):788-792.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  4
    Democratic Authority From the Outside Looking In.Cindy Holder - 2011 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 5 (3):1-16.
    In THE CONSTITUTION OF EQUALITY, Thomas Christiano takes on the question of why decisions that have been democratically arrived at should be treated as authoritative even if we do not agree with them. A key element of that argument is the concept of a “common world”. Christiano takes the connections between people produced by subjection to the same state as the paradigmatic case of a common world, and seems to assume that state-based common worlds take normative priority over common-world-like connections (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark