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  1.  11
    Releasing Education Into the Wild: An Education in, and of, the Outdoors.Claire Skea & Amanda Fulford - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (1):74-90.
    ABSTRACT This paper considers the recent growth in different kinds of learning outside the classroom, especially Forest Schools. It shows how the activities associated with Forest Schools often involve mainstream curriculum content delivered in outdoor settings, with a focus on developing skills and attitudes that can be utilised when back in the classroom. Drawing on the works of Henry David Thoreau and Anna Shepherd, we suggest that there is an important distinction to be made between an education in the outdoors, (...)
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  2.  5
    Seeing Education on Film: A Conceptual Aesthetics.Claire Skea - 2021 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 40 (4):443-446.
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  3.  5
    Emerging Neoliberal Academic Identities: Looking Beyond Homo Economicus.Claire Skea - 2021 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 40 (4):399-414.
    In this article, I deal with the notion of ‘academic identity’ holistically, seeking to bring together the teacher and researcher roles of academics in the neoliberal university. The article begins from the perspective of early-career academics who occupy the majority of fixed-term, teaching-only contracts in Higher Education, arguing that such casualisation of academic labour entrenches the role of the academic as Homo economicus. Drawing on the work of Foucault, I demonstrate how a neoliberal governmentality is now not only exerted upon (...)
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  4.  15
    Student Satisfaction in Higher Education: Settling Up and Settling Down.Claire Skea - 2017 - Ethics and Education 12 (3):364-377.
    Student satisfaction measures serve to provide a measure of ‘quality’ in the current audit culture of universities. This paper argues that the form of satisfaction valued within contemporary Higher Education amounts to a form of settling, where the primary aim is to settle the students’ expectations, and meet their needs. Drawing initially on the etymology of ‘satisfaction’, the paper then turns to the work of Martin Heidegger and his notion of the ‘uncanny’, to discuss how we are ontologically unsettled. The (...)
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