Results for 'Classicism History'

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  1.  11
    Turner's Classicism and the Problem of Periodization in the History of Art.Philipp Fehl - 1976 - Critical Inquiry 3 (1):93-129.
    It was the general practice until not at all long ago to look at Turner as one of the moderns, if not as one of the founding fathers of modern art. He was a man straddling the fence between two periods, but he was looking forward. In a history of art that marches through time, forever endorsing what is about to be forgotten, wrapping up, as it were, one style to open eagerly the package of the next, such a (...)
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  2.  37
    Things Old and New - A. M. Kinneging: Aristocracy, Antiquity and History: Classicism in Political Thought. Pp. Xii + 348. New Brunswick, NJ and London: Transaction Publishers, 1996. $39.95. ISBN: 1-56000-222-0. [REVIEW]Robin Osborne - 1998 - The Classical Review 48 (1):158-160.
  3. "Classicism and Romanticism, with Other Studies in Art History": Frederick Antal. [REVIEW]Michael Eastham - 1967 - British Journal of Aesthetics 7 (3):295.
     
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  4. Aristocracy, Antiquity & History: Classicism in Political Thought. By Andreas AM Kinneging.J. E. Phillips - 1998 - The European Legacy 3:137-137.
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  5.  89
    Classicism and Romanticism, with Other Studies in Art History.Frederick Antal - 1968 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 27 (1):112-113.
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  6.  24
    Friedrich Nietzsche and Weimar Classicism.Paul Bishop - 2005 - Camden House.
    Die Geburt der Tragödie and Weimar classicism -- The formative influence of Weimar classicism in the genesis of Zarathustra -- The aesthetic gospel of Nietzsche's Zarathustra -- From Leucippus to Cassirer : toward a genealogy of "sincere semblance".
  7. A History of Political Experience. [REVIEW]Leslie Marsh - 2006 - European Journal of Political Theory 5 (4):504-510.
    This book survives superficial but fails deeper scrutiny. A facile, undiscerning criticism of Lectures in the History of Political Thought (LHPT) is that on Oakeshott’s own account these are lectures on a non-subject: ‘I cannot detect anything which could properly correspond to the expression “the history of political thought”’ (p. 32). This is an entirely typical Oakeshottian swipe – elegant and oblique – at the title of the lecture course he inherited from Harold Laski. If title and quotation (...)
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  8.  19
    Probability and Literary Form: Philosophic Theory and Literary Practice in the Augustan Age.Douglas Lane Patey - 1984 - Cambridge University Press.
    By examining in particular Augustan notions of probability and the way they provided a framework for thinking about and organising experience, Dr Patey ...
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  9. From Classic to Romantic.Walter Jackson Bate - 1946 - Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
     
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  10.  3
    Pathos, Ausdruck Und Bewegung: Zur Ästhetik des Weimarer Klassizismus 1796-1806.Martin Dönike - 2005 - De Gruyter.
    Ziel und Anliegen der Arbeit ist es, einen neuen Blick auf die Kunsttheorie der "Weimarer Klassik" zu werfen, um hinter dem Klischee einer in "edler Einfalt und stiller Größe" versteinerten Kunstlehre eine flexible und dynamische ...
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  11. Two Augustans: John Locke, Jonathan Swift.Ricardo Quintana - 1978 - University of Wisconsin Press.
  12.  77
    Elective Affinities: Musical Essays on the History of Aesthetic Theory.Lydia Goehr - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    As illustrated in Goethe's famous novel of the same name, elective affinities are powerful relationships that crystallize under changing conditions. In this new book, Lydia Goehr focuses on the history of elective affinities between philosophy and music from German classicism, romanticism, and idealism to the modernist aesthetic theory of Theodor W. Adorno and Arthur C. Danto. Aesthetic theory, she argues, depends on a dynamic philosophy of history centered on tendencies, yearnings, needs, and potentialities. With this in mind, (...)
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  13.  19
    The Barbarian as Agent of History.Mădălin Onu - 2016 - Cultura 13 (1):69-88.
    Herder, the German humanist from the end of the 18th century, a representative of Weimar classicism and of the Sturm und Drang movement, man of letters, philosopher of history, defender of popular cultures, advocate of the uniqueness and importance of every civilization. The ways in which one may summarize his legacy extend even further. The present paper will focus on the philosophy of history. We will prove that his writings reveal a complex and solid theory of barbarianism, (...)
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  14.  8
    The Classic Is the Baroque: On the Principle of Wölfflin's Art History.Marshall Brown - 1982 - Critical Inquiry 9 (2):379-404.
    In the chapter on multiplicity and unity, the affective or anthropological motifs are both more complex and more interesting. Wölfflin’s initial distinction is between “the articulated system of forms of classic art and the flow of the baroque” . Imagery of fluidity pervades the chapter, for water, according to Wölfflin, “was the period’s favourite element” . “Now, and now only,” he says, “the greatness of the sea could find its representation”, and as if to inculcate this affinity he places the (...)
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  15.  6
    The Safe Haven of a New Classicism: The Quest for a New Aesthetics in Hungary 1904–1912.Éva Forgács - 2008 - Studies in East European Thought 60 (1-2):75-95.
    Seen through the quest for a new metaphysics, the visual arts were interpreted in the framework of the particular sense of progress that the generation of György Lukács developed in the first decade of the twentieth century. They saw Impressionism as the veritable symptom of the deficiencies of their age and dreamed of a great, solid, lasting new Hungarian culture which would transcend the fragmentariness, sociological interests, and ethereality of Impressionism. Although exhibitions of contemporary modernist art were organized in Budapest (...)
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  16.  13
    Cultural Pluralism and the Limitations of the Classicist Conception of Culture.Paul St Amour - 2003 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 77:259-271.
    Bernard Lonergan has attempted to clarify a major theoretical transition from a classicist conception of culture, which was operative for over two millennia,to a contemporary notion of culture which is empirical, historicist, and pluralist. I argue that this transition has significant implications for apprehending boththe difficulty and the possibility of intercultural understanding. While the need for intercultural understanding is timely and obvious, its actual achievement hasproven elusive. One major impediment, I argue, has been the effective persistence of classicist assumptions which (...)
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  17. L'homme En Action: La Représentation Littéraire d'Aristote à Zola.Paolo Tortonese - 2013 - Classiques Garnier.
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  18.  22
    Friedrich Nietzsche and Weimar Classicism.Anthony Jensen - 2007 - New Nietzsche Studies 7 (3-4):168-171.
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  19. Winckelmann's 'Philosophy of Art': A Prelude to German Classicism.John Harry North - 2012 - Cambridge Scholars Press.
     
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  20.  13
    Humanistic and Political Literature in Florence and Venice at the Beginning of the Quattrocento: Studies in Criticism and ChronologyThe Crisis of the Early Italian Renaissance: Civic Humanism and Republican Liberty in an Age of Classicism and Tyranny.Charles Trinkaus & Hans Baron - 1956 - Journal of the History of Ideas 17 (3):426.
  21.  9
    Malaria and the Decline of Ancient Greece: Revisiting the Jones Hypothesis in an Era of Interdisciplinarity.Christopher Baron & Christopher Hamlin - 2015 - Minerva 53 (4):327-358.
    Between 1906 and 1909 the biologist Ronald Ross and the classicist W.H.S. Jones pioneered interdisciplinary research in biology and history in advancing the claim that malaria had been crucial in the decline of golden-age Greece. The idea had originated with Ross, winner of the Nobel Prize for demonstrating the importance of mosquitoes in the spread of the disease. Jones assembled what, today, we would call an interdisciplinary network of collaborators in the sciences and humanities. But early negative reviews of (...)
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  22. Globality and Classicism: The Moralists Encounter the Self.Eric Méchoulan - 2010 - In Christie McDonald & Susan Rubin Suleiman (eds.), French Global: A New Approach to Literary History. Columbia University Press.
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  23.  5
    Pasquier's Recherches de la France: The Exemplarity of His Medieval Sources.Nancy S. Struever - 1988 - History and Theory 27 (1):51-59.
    An analysis of the exemplary strategy of Pasquier reveals an intriguing shift in the premises, procedures, and goals of his history, arising from the superimposition of an internalized medieval task on a very different humanist, or classicist, task. Machiavelli's classicizing exempla undermine his theory, while Pasquier's medieval exempla make sense of the Machiavellian project, and can be seen to disconnect the reader from the exemplary. Pasquier retains the Machiavellian analysis of efficiency while subverting the duty of heroic imitation. The (...)
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  24. History and Scientific Practice in the Construction of an Adequate Philosophy of Science: Revisiting a Whewell/Mill Debate.Aaron D. Cobb - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):85-93.
    William Whewell raised a series of objections concerning John Stuart Mill’s philosophy of science which suggested that Mill’s views were not properly informed by the history of science or by adequate reflection on scientific practices. The aim of this paper is to revisit and evaluate this incisive Whewellian criticism of Mill’s views by assessing Mill’s account of Michael Faraday’s discovery of electrical induction. The historical evidence demonstrates that Mill’s reconstruction is an inadequate reconstruction of this historical episode and the (...)
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  25. The Benefit to Philosophy of the Study of its History.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (1):161-184.
    This paper advances the view that the history of philosophy is both a kind of history and a kind of philosophy. Through a discussion of some examples from epistemology, metaphysics, and the historiography of philosophy, it explores the benefit to philosophy of a deep and broad engagement with its history. It comes to the conclusion that doing history of philosophy is a way to think outside the box of the current philosophical orthodoxies. Somewhat paradoxically, far from (...)
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  26.  58
    The End of History and the Last Man.Francis FUKUYAMA - 1992 - Free Press ;.
    Ever since its first publication in 1992, The End of History and the Last Man has provoked controversy and debate. Francis Fukuyama's prescient analysis of religious fundamentalism, politics, scientific progress, ethical codes, and war is as essential for a world fighting fundamentalist terrorists as it was for the end of the Cold War. Now updated with a new afterword, The End of History and the Last Man is a modern classic.
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  27. The Possibilities of History.Daniel Nolan - 2016 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 10 (3):441-456.
    _ Source: _Volume 10, Issue 3, pp 441 - 456 Several kinds of historical alternatives are distinguished. Different kinds of historical alternatives are valuable to the practice of history for different reasons. Important uses for historical alternatives include representing different sides of historical disputes; distributing chances of different outcomes over alternatives; and offering explanations of why various alternatives did _not_ in fact happen. Consideration of counterfactuals about what would have happened had things been different in particular ways plays particularly (...)
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  28.  66
    Conceptual History and the Philosophy of the Later Wittgenstein: A Critique of Quentin Skinner’s Contextualism.Tony Burns - 2011 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (1):54-83.
    Although first published in 1969, the methodological views advanced in Quentin Skinner's “Meaning and Understanding in the History of Ideas” remain relevant today. In his article Skinner suggests that it would be inappropriate to even attempt to write the history of any idea or concept. In support of this view, Skinner advances two arguments, one derived from the philosophy of the later Wittgenstein and the other from that of J. L. Austin. In this paper I focus on the (...)
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  29.  28
    History in the Gene: Negotiations Between Molecular and Organismal Anthropology.Marianne Sommer - 2008 - Journal of the History of Biology 41 (3):473-528.
    In the advertising discourse of human genetic database projects, of genetic ancestry tracing companies, and in popular books on anthropological genetics, what I refer to as the anthropological gene and genome appear as documents of human history, by far surpassing the written record and oral history in scope and accuracy as archives of our past. How did macromolecules become "documents of human evolutionary history"? Historically, molecular anthropology, a term introduced by Emile Zuckerkandl in 1962 to characterize the (...)
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  30. The Role of Oral History in Surviving a Eugenic Past.Robert A. Wilson - 2015 - In Steven High (ed.), Beyond Testimony and Trauma: Oral History in the Aftermath of Mass Violence. pp. 119-138.
    Despite the fact that the history of eugenics in Canada is necessarily part of the larger history of eugenics, there is a special role for oral history to play in the telling of this story, a role that promises to shift us from the muddled middle of the story. Not only has the testimony of eugenics survivors already played perhaps the most important role in revealing much about the practice of eugenics in Canada, but the willingness and (...)
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  31.  32
    Suppressing Synonymy with a Homonym: The Emergence of the Nomenclatural Type Concept in Nineteenth Century Natural History.Joeri Witteveen - 2016 - Journal of the History of Biology 49 (1):135-189.
    ‘Type’ in biology is a polysemous term. In a landmark article, Paul Farber (Journal of the History of Biology 9(1): 93–119, 1976) argued that this deceptively plain term had acquired three different meanings in early nineteenth century natural history alone. ‘Type’ was used in relation to three distinct type concepts, each of them associated with a different set of practices. Important as Farber’s analysis has been for the historiography of natural history, his account conceals an important dimension (...)
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  32. Kant, History, and the Idea of Moral Development.Pauline Kleingeld - 1999 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 16 (1):59-80.
    I examine the consistency of Kant's notion of moral progress as found in his philosophy of history. To many commentators, Kant's very idea of moral development has seemed inconsistent with basic tenets of his critical philosophy. This idea has seemed incompatible with his claims that the moral law is unconditionally and universally valid, that moral agency is noumenal and atemporal, and that all humans are equally free. Against these charges, I argue not only that Kant's notion of moral development (...)
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  33.  99
    The History of Philosophy as Philosophy.Gary Hatfield - 2005 - In Tom Sorell & G. A. J. Rogers (eds.), Analytic Philosophy and History of Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 82-128.
    The chapter begins with an initial survey of ups and downs of contextualist history of philosophy during the twentieth century in Britain and America, which finds that historically serious history of philosophy has been on the rise. It then considers ways in which the study of past philosophy has been used and is used in philosophy, and makes a case for the philosophical value and necessity of a contextually oriented approach. It examines some uses of past texts and (...)
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  34. The History of Philosophy and the Persona of the Philosopher.Ian Hunter - 2007 - Modern Intellectual History 4 (3):571-600.
    Although history is the pre-eminent part of the gallant sciences, philosophers advise against it from fear that it might completely destroy the kingdom of darkness—that is, scholastic philosophy—which previously has been wrongly held to be a necessary instrument of theology.
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  35.  52
    Ethology, Natural History, the Life Sciences, and the Problem of Place.Richard W. Burkhardt - 1999 - Journal of the History of Biology 32 (3):489 - 508.
    Investigators of animal behavior since the eighteenth century have sought to make their work integral to the enterprises of natural history and/or the life sciences. In their efforts to do so, they have frequently based their claims of authority on the advantages offered by the special places where they have conducted their research. The zoo, the laboratory, and the field have been major settings for animal behavior studies. The issue of the relative advantages of these different sites has been (...)
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  36.  39
    The History of Emotions: An Interview with William Reddy, Barbara Rosenwein, and Peter Stearns.Jan Plamper - 2010 - History and Theory 49 (2):237-265.
    The history of emotions is a burgeoning field—so much so, that some are invoking an “emotional turn.” As a way of charting this development, I have interviewed three of the leading practitioners of the history of emotions: William Reddy, Barbara Rosenwein, and Peter Stearns. The interviews retrace each historian’s intellectual-biographical path to the history of emotions, recapitulate key concepts, and critically discuss the limitations of the available analytical tools. In doing so, they touch on Reddy’s concepts of (...)
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  37.  18
    Production Revolutions and Periodization of History: A Comparative and Theoretic-Mathematical Approach.Leonid Grinin - 2007 - Social Evolution and History 6 (2).
    There is no doubt that periodization is a rather effective method of data ordering and analysis, but it deals with exceptionally complex types of processual and temporal phenomena and thus it simplifies historical reality. Many scholars emphasize the great importance of periodization for the study of history. In fact, any periodization suffers from one-sidedness and certain deviations from reality. However, the number and significance of such deviations can be radically diminished as the effectiveness of periodization is directly connected with (...)
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  38. The Subject of History: Historical Subjectivity and Historical Science.Ericka Tucker - 2013 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (2):205-229.
    In this paper, I show how the phenomenological and hermeneutic traditions and method converge on their treatment of the historical subject. Thinkers from both traditions claim that subjectivity is shaped by a historical worldview. Each tradition provides an account of how these worldviews are shaped, and thus how essentially historical subjective experience is molded. I argue that both traditions, although offering helpful ways of understanding the way history shapes subjectivity, go too far in their epistemic claims for the superiority (...)
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  39. Dewey: A Pragmatist View of History.Serge Grigoriev - 2012 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (2):173-194.
    Despite the centrality of the idea of history to Dewey's overall philosophical outlook, his brief treatment of philosophical issues in history has never attracted much attention, partly because of the dearth of the available material. Nonetheless, as argued in this essay, what we do have provides for the outlines of a comprehensive pragmatist view of history distinguished by an emphasis on methodological pluralism and a principled opposition to thinking of historical knowledge in correspondence terms. The key conceptions (...)
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  40.  31
    Historical Explanations Always Involve Counterfactual History.Cass R. Sunstein - 2016 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 10 (3):433-440.
    _ Source: _Volume 10, Issue 3, pp 433 - 440 Historical explanations are a form of counterfactual history. To offer an explanation of what happened, historians have to identify causes, and whenever they identify causes, they immediately conjure up a counterfactual history, a parallel world. No one doubts that there is a great deal of distance between science fiction novelists and the world’s great historians, but along an important dimension, they are playing the same game.
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  41. Four Problems of Abduction: A Brief History.Anya Plutynski - 2011 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 1 (2):227-248.
    Debates concerning the character, scope, and warrant of abductive inference have been active since Peirce first proposed that there was a third form of inference, distinct from induction and deduction. Abductive reasoning has been dubbed weak, incoherent, and even nonexistent. Part, at least, of the problem of articulating a clear sense of abductive inference is due to difficulty in interpreting Peirce. Part of the fault must lie with his critics, however. While this article will argue that Peirce indeed left a (...)
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  42.  22
    Performing History: How Historical Scholarship is Shaped by Epistemic Virtues.Herman Paul - 2011 - History and Theory 50 (1):1-19.
    Philosophers of history in the past few decades have been predominantly interested in issues of explanation and narrative discourse. Consequently, they have focused consistently and almost exclusively on the historian’s output, thereby ignoring that historical scholarship is a practice of reading, thinking, discussing, and writing, in which successful performance requires active cultivation of certain skills, attitudes, and virtues. This paper, then, suggests a new agenda for philosophy of history. Inspired by a “performative turn” in the history and (...)
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  43. The Necessity of History for Philosophy – Even Analytic Philosophy.Paul Redding - 2013 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (3):299-325.
    Analytic philosophers are often said to be indifferent or even hostile to the history of philosophy – that is, not to the idea of history of philosophy as such, but regarded as a species of the genus philosophy rather than the genus history. Here it is argued that such an attitude is actually inconsistent with approaches within the philosophies of mind that are typical within analytic philosophy. It is suggested that the common “argument rather than pedigree” claim (...)
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  44.  68
    The Implications of Robert Brandom's Inferentialism for Intellectual History.David L. Marshall - 2013 - History and Theory 52 (1):1-31.
    Quentin Skinner’s appropriation of speech act theory for intellectual history has been extremely influential. Even as the model continues to be important for historians, however, philosophers now regard the original speech act theory paradigm as dated. Are there more recent initiatives that might reignite theoretical work in this area? This article argues that the inferentialism of Robert Brandom is one of the most interesting contemporary philosophical projects with historical implications. It shows how Brandom’s work emerged out of the broad (...)
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  45.  40
    Simone Weil’s Philosophy of History.Bennett Gilbert - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 13 (1):66-85.
    The philosophical and religious ideas of Simone Weil bear on theory of history and historiography in ways not previously explored. They amount to a view of history as a consequence of the original creation, but they also exclude theodicy. By examining these ideas we see some of the ways in which to develop a theory history centered on a conception of moral understanding that is impartialist and universal. For Weil such understanding is both inside of and outside (...)
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  46.  23
    “Big History” Old and New: Presuppositions, Limits, Alternatives.Allan Megill - 2015 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (2):306-326.
    _ Source: _Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 306 - 326 In recent years David Christian and others have promoted “Big History” as an innovative approach to the study of the past. The present paper juxtaposes to Big History an old Big History, namely, the tradition of “universal history” that flourished in Europe from the mid-sixteenth century until well into the nineteenth century. The claim to universality of works in that tradition depended on the assumed truth of (...)
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  47.  12
    Gombrich’s Critique of Hauser’s Social History of Art.Jim Berryman - 2017 - History of European Ideas 43 (5):494-506.
    This article examines E.H. Gombrich’s critical appraisal of Arnold Hauser’s book, The Social History of Art. Hauser’s Social History of Art was published in 1951, a year after Gombrich’s bestseller, The Story of Art. Although written in Britain for an English-speaking public, both books had their origins in the intellectual history of Central Europe: Gombrich was an Austrian art historian and Hauser was Hungarian. Gombrich’s critique, published in The Art Bulletin in 1953, attacked Hauser’s dialectical materialism and (...)
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  48.  65
    Introduction. Big History's Big Potential.Leonid Grinin, David Baker, Esther Quaedackers & Andrey V. Korotayev - 2014 - In Leonid Grinin, David Baker, Esther Quaedackers & Andrey V. Korotayev (eds.), Teaching & Researching Big History: Exploring a New Scholarly Field. Volgograd: Uchitel Publishing House. pp. 7-18.
    Big History has been developing very fast indeed. We are currently observing a ‘Cambrian explosion’ in terms of its popularity and diffusion. Big History courses are taught in the schools and universities of several dozen countries, including China, Korea, the Netherlands, the USA, India, Russia, Japan, Australia, Great Britain, Germany, and many more. The International Big History Association (IBHA) is gaining momentum in its projects and membership. Conferences are beginning to be held regularly (this edited volume has (...)
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  49.  23
    Teaching Energy Informed by the History and Epistemology of the Concept with Implications for Teacher Education.Manuel Bächtold & Muriel Guedj - 2014 - In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. pp. 211-243.
    In this article, we put forward a new strategy for teaching the concept of energy. In the first section, we discuss how the concept is currently treated in educational programmes at primary and secondary level (taking the case of France), the learning difficulties that arise as well as the main teaching strategies presented in science education literature. In the second section, we argue that due to the complexity of the concept of energy, rethinking how it is taught should involve teacher (...)
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  50. Philosophy of History as the History of Philosophy in Schelling’s System of Transcendental Idealism.Jeffrey Bernstein - 2004 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 8 (2):233-254.
    Schelling’s System of Transcendental Idealism is usually considered to be either an early Fichtean-influenced work that gives little insight into Schelling’s philosophy or a text focusing on self-consciousness and aesthetics. I argue that Schelling’s System develops a subtle conception of history which originates in a dialogue with Kant and Hegel and concludes in proximity to an Idealist version of Spinoza. In this way, Schelling develops a philosophy of history which is, simultaneously, a dialectical engagement with the history (...)
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