Results for 'Claudine Fabre-Vassas'

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  1. Claudine Fabre-Vassas, The Singular Beast: Jews, Christians, and the Pig.S. Clark - 1998 - Thesis Eleven 54:137-139.
     
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  2.  10
    La fiancée d'Aleph.Claudine Fabre-Vassas - 1995 - Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History 2:7-7.
    L'avènement de l'imprimerie suscite dans le monde du judaïsme aschénaze un formidable élan de la langue yiddish. Simultanèment les grands textes sacrés sont traduits de l'hébreu et une production originale innerve tous les milieux. Pourtant, très vite, le yiddish est associé à l'émergence d'une littérature « religieuse » destinée aux femmes ou même écrite par elles, au point qu'un caractère typographique, le waybertaytch (« yiddish des femmes ») lui est réservé. C'est ce phénomène que l'auteur interroge dans l'éclairage d'une recherche (...)
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  3.  1
    La Fiancée d'Aleph.Claudine Fabre-Vassas - 1995 - Clio 2.
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  4. Éditorial.Claudine Vassas & Claudine Leduc - 2001 - Clio 14:5-16.
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    En Roumanie, L’Autre Moitié du Rite : Les Cuisinières des Morts.Claudine Vassas - 2001 - Clio 14:119-153.
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  6.  1
    Présences du féminin dans le judaïsme.Claudine Vassas - 2016 - Clio 44:201-228.
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  7. Présences du Féminin Dans le judaïsmeThe Feminine in Judaism.Claudine Vassas - 2016 - Clio 44:201-228.
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  8. Colette Collomb-Boureau (éd.), Les sœurs Grimké : de l’antiesclavagisme aux droits de la femme.Claudine Vassas - 2017 - Clio 46.
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  9.  94
    Distributive Justice and Freedom: Cohen on Money and Labour*: Cécile Fabre.Cécile Fabre - 2010 - Utilitas 22 (4):393-412.
    In his recent Rescuing Justice and Equality, G. A. Cohen mounts a sustained critique of coerced labour, against the background of a radical egalitarian conception of distributive justice. In this article, I argue that Cohenian egalitarians are committed to holding the talented under a moral duty to choose socially useful work for the sake of the less fortunate. As I also show, Cohen's arguments against coerced labour fail, particularly in the light of his commitment to coercive taxation. In the course (...)
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  10.  14
    Claudine COHEN, La femme des origines. Images de la femme dans la préhistoire occidentale, Paris, Belin-Herscher, 2003, 191 pages. [REVIEW]Claudine Leduc - 2006 - Clio 23:343-346.
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  11.  38
    Is the Body Special? Review of Cecile Fabre, Whose Body is It Anyway? Justice and the Integrity of the Person.Cécile Fabre - 2009 - Utilitas 21 (2).
  12.  40
    Whose Body is It Anyway?: Justice and the Integrity of the Person.Cécile Fabre - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    Do we have the right to deny others access to our body? What if this would harm those who need personal services or body parts from us? Ccile Fabre examines the impact that arguments for distributive justice have on the rights we have over ourselves, and on such contentious issues as organ sales, prostitution, and surrogate motherhood.
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  13.  43
    Cosmopolitan War.Cécile Fabre - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Introduction -- Cosmopolitanism -- Collective self-defense -- Subsistence wars -- Humanitarian intervention -- Commodified wars -- Asymmetrical wars -- Conclusion.
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  14. Semantic Normativity and Naturalism.Claudine Verheggen - 2011 - Logique Et Analyse 54 (216):553-567.
    I distinguish among three senses in which meaning may be said to be normative, one trivial, the other two more robust. According to the trivial sense, meaningful expressions have conditions of correct application. According to the first robust sense, these conditions are determined by norms. According to the second robust sense, statements about these conditions have normative implications. Normativity in one or the other of the robust senses, but not in the trivial sense, is commonly thought to pose a threat (...)
     
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  15.  75
    Towards a New Kind of Semantic Normativity.Claudine Verheggen - 2015 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 23 (3):410-424.
    Hannah Ginsborg has recently offered a new account of normativity, according to which normative attitudes are essential to the meaningful use of language. The kind of normativity she has in mind –– not semantic but ‘primitive’ — is supposed to help us to avoid the pitfalls of both non-reductionist and reductive dispositionalist theories of meaning. For, according to her, it enables us both to account for meaning in non-semantic terms, which non-reductionism cannot do, and to make room for the normativity (...)
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  16. Triangulating with Davidson.Claudine Verheggen - 2007 - Philosophical Quarterly 57 (226):96-103.
    According to Davidson, 'triangulation' is necessary both to fix the meanings of one's thoughts and utterances and to have the concept of objectivity, both of which are necessary for thinking and talking at all. Against these claims, it has been objected that neither meaning-determination nor possession of the concept of objectivity requires triangulation; nor does the ability to think and talk require possession of the concept of objectivity. But this overlooks the important connection between the tasks that triangulation is meant (...)
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  17. Davidson's Second Person.Claudine Verheggen - 1997 - Philosophical Quarterly 47 (188):361-369.
    According to Donald Davidson, language is social in that only a person who has interacted linguistically with another could have a language. This paper is a discussion of Davidson’s argument in defence of that claim. I argue that he has not succeeded in establishing it, but that he has provided many of the materials out of which a successful argument could be built. Chief among these are the claims that some version of externalism about meaning is true, that possession of (...)
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  18.  13
    Against Body Exceptionalism: A Reply to Eyal: Cécile Fabre.C. Écile Fabre - 2009 - Utilitas 21 (2):246-248.
    It is hard to do justice, in a short reply, to Eyal's excellent review. Accordingly, I will focus on what I take to be its central claim – namely that I fail to give proper consideration to the extent to which the forced extraction of body parts undermines individuals' opportunities for self-respect. According to Eyal, ‘body exceptionalism’ can be defended on the following grounds: ‘People usually see trespass into a person and into objects they associate with a person – especially (...)
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  19. How Social Must Language Be?Claudine Verheggen - 2006 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 36 (2):203-219.
    According to the communitarian view, often attributed to the later Wittgenstein, language is social in the sense that having a (first) language essentially depends on meaning by one's words what members of some community mean by them. According to the interpersonal view, defended by Davidson, language is social only in the sense that having a (first) language essentially depends on having used (at least some of) one's words, whatever one means by them, to communicate with others. Even though these views (...)
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  20. Wittgenstein's Rule-Following Paradox and the Objectivity of Meaning.Claudine Verheggen - 2003 - Philosophical Investigations 26 (4):285–310.
    Two readings of Wittgenstein's rule-following paradox dominate the literature: either his arguments lead to skepticism, and thus to the view that only a deflated account of meaning is available, or they lead to quietism, and thus to the view that no philosophical account of meaning is called for. I argue, against both these positions, that a proper diagnosis of the paradox points the way towards a constructive, non-sceptical account of meaning.
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  21.  47
    Wittgenstein and 'Solitary' Languages.Claudine Verheggen - 1995 - Philosophical Investigations 18 (4):329-347.
  22. Wittgenstein and Davidson on Language, Thought, and Action.Claudine Verheggen (ed.) - 2017 - Cambridge University Press.
    Wittgenstein and Davidson are two of the most influential and controversial figures of twentieth-century philosophy. However, whereas Wittgenstein is often regarded as a deflationary philosopher, Davidson is considered to be a theory builder and systematic philosopher par excellence. Consequently, little work has been devoted to comparing their philosophies with each other. In this volume of new essays, leading scholars show that in fact there is much that the two share. By focusing on the similarities between Wittgenstein and Davidson, their essays (...)
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  23.  15
    The Economy of Research and the Proper Defense of Knowledge and Intellectual Virtues.Claudine Tiercelin - 2018 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 54 (2):183.
    While Peirce presented himself as a "scholastic realist of a somewhat extreme stripe", merely adapting the virtues involved in Scotism to the requirements of modern science to erect a plain scientific realistic metaphysics, he was also eager to emphasize that "everybody ought to be a nominalist at first" because such an hypothesis is "simpler than realism" and because "the economy of research prescribes to try the simpler one first, and to continue in that opinion", until one "is driven out of (...)
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  24.  86
    Guns, Food, and Liability to Attack in War.Cécile Fabre - 2009 - Ethics 120 (1):36-63.
  25. The Meaningfulness of Meaning Questions.Claudine Verheggen - 2000 - Synthese 123 (2):195-216.
    Contra an expanding number of deflationary commentators onWittgenstein, I argue that philosophical questions about meaningare meaningful and that Wittgenstein gave us ample reason tobelieve so. Deflationists are right in claiming that Wittgensteinrejected the sceptical problem about meaning allegedly to befound in his later writings and also right in stressing Wittgenstein''s anti-reductionism. But they are wrong in taking these dismissals to entail the end of all constructive philosophizing about meaning. Rather, I argue, the rejection of the sceptical problem requires that we (...)
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  26. Triangulation.Claudine Verheggen - 2013 - In Ernie Lepore & Kirk Ludwig (eds.), A Companion to Donald Davidson (Blackwell Companions to Philosophy). Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 456-471.
    The chapter first provides a detailed exposition of Davidson's triangulation argument to the effect that only someone who has interacted simultaneously with another person and the world they share could have a language and thoughts. It then examines the core objections that have been made to the argument, namely, that triangulation is not needed either to fix the propositional contents of one's thoughts and utterances or to have the concept of objective truth; that one need not have the concept of (...)
     
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  27.  40
    The Morality of Defensive War.Cécile Fabre & Seth Lazar (eds.) - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    International law and conventional morality grant that states may stand ready to defend their borders with lethal force. But what grounds the permission to kill for the sake of political sovereignty and territorial integrity? In this book leading theorists address this vexed issue, and set the terms of future debate over national defence.
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  28.  7
    In Defense of a Critical Commonsensist Conception of Knowledge.Claudine Tiercelin - 2016 - International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 6 (2-3):182-202.
  29.  8
    Mandatory Rescue Killings &Ast.Cécile Fabre - 2007 - Journal of Political Philosophy 15 (4):363-384.
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  30.  35
    Peirce on Norms, Evolution and Knowledge.Claudine Tiercelin - 1997 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 33 (1):35 - 58.
    The aim of the text is to evaluate Peirce's evolutionary cosmology and to try to make sense of the mixture of idealistic and naturalistic elements that may be found in it, especially by focusing on Peirce's conception of logical norms and rationality, and on the links that may be drawn between such views and some evolutionary themes in the contemporary debates on norms, belief and knowledge.
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  31.  63
    Stroud on Wittgenstein, Meaning, and Community.Claudine Verheggen - 2005 - Dialogue 44 (1):67-85.
    According to Barry Stroud, Wittgenstein thought that language is social only in this minimal way: we cannot make sense of the idea of someone having a language unless we can describe her as using signs in conformity with the linguistic practices of some community. Since a solitary person could meet this condition, Stroud concludes that, for Wittgenstein, solitary languages are possible. I argue that Wittgenstein in fact thought that language is social in a much more robust way. Solitary languages are (...)
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  32.  24
    Peace, Self‐Determination and Reckoning with the Past: A Reply to Butt, Lippert‐Rasmussen, Pasternak, Wellman and Stemplowska.Cécile Fabre - 2019 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 36 (3):391-404.
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  33.  25
    Metaphysics Without Ontology?Claudine Tiercelin - 2006 - Contemporary Pragmatism 3 (2):55-66.
    This symposium contribution discusses some issues of ontology involved in the metaethics of Hilary Putnam's book Ethics without Ontology.
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  34.  35
    Philosophers and the Moral Life.Claudine Tiercelin - 2002 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 38 (1/2):307 - 326.
    Part of the obvious revival of pragmatism, at least in Europe is linked with the present success or "boom" of moral philosophy and the increasing tendency to identify the classical pragmatists as a common group of writers who, much better than any philosophers from other traditions, knew how to define scientific inquiry as an inquiry submitted to norms and principels, and realized that "what applies to investigation in general equally applies to ethical investigation ". The paper examines such claims and (...)
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  35.  44
    Peirce's Objective Idealism: A Defense.Claudine Tiercelin - 1998 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 34 (1):1 - 28.
  36.  12
    Abduction and the Semiotics of Perception.Claudine Tiercelin - 2005 - Semiotica 2005 (153 - 1/4):389-412.
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  37. Peirce's Realistic Approach to Mathematics: Or Can One Be a Realist Without Being a Platonist.Claudine Tiercelin - unknown
    Peirce's realism is a sophisticated realism inherited from the Avicennian Scotistic tradition, which may be briefly characterized by its opposition to metaphysical realism and various forms of nominalism. In this chapter, I consider how Peirce's realism fits his approach to mathematics, which is often presented as a somewhat incoherent mixture of Platonistic and conceptualistic elements. Without denying these, I claim that Peirce's subtle position not only helps to clear up some of these so-called inconsistencies but offers many insights for contemporary (...)
     
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  38.  19
    Social Rights Under the Constitution: Government and the Decent Life.Cécile Fabre - 2000 - Oxford University Press.
    The book theoretically examines the recent and topical debates over democracy and social rights, arguing that there are four fundamental rights that should be constitutionalized; minimum income; housing; healthcare; and education. The theoretical discussion is explored within an analysis of important legal cases.
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  39.  99
    VIII-Permissible Rescue Killings.Cécile Fabre - 2009 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 109 (1pt2):149-164.
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  40.  25
    Fabre’s Crusade for Justice: Why We Should Not Join. [REVIEW]Daniel Statman - 2014 - Law and Philosophy 33 (3):337-360.
    Cosmopolitan War is characterized by a tension between moral demandingness and moral permissiveness. On the one hand, Fabre is strongly committed to the value of each and all human beings as precious individuals whose value does not depend on their national or other affiliation. This commitment leads to serious constraints on what may be done to others in both individual and national self-defense. Yet the book is also unambiguously permissive. It opens the gate to far more wars than traditional (...)
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  41.  34
    The Fixation of Knowledge and the Question-Answer Process of Inquiry.Claudine Tiercelin - 2008 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 77 (1):23-44.
    The aim of the paper is to present some important insights of C. Hookway's pragmatist analysis of knowledge viewed less in the standard way, as justified true belief, than as a dynamic natural and normative question-answer process of inquiry, a reliable and successful agent-based enterprise, consisting in virtuous dispositions explaining how we can be held responsible for our beliefs and investigations. Despite the merits of such an approach, the paper shows that it may be inefficient in accounting for some challenges (...)
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  42.  60
    Mandatory Rescue Killings.Cécile Fabre - 2007 - Journal of Political Philosophy 15 (4):363–384.
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  43.  53
    Permissible Rescue Killings.Cécile Fabre - 2009 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 109 (1pt2):149-164.
    Many believe that agent-centred considerations, unlike agent-neutral reasons, cannot show that victims have the right to kill their attackers in self-defence, let alone establish that rescuers have the right to come to their help. In this paper, I argue that the right to kill in self- or other-defence is best supported by a hybrid set of reasons. In particular, agent-centred considerations account for the plausible intuition that victims have a special stake, which other parties lack, in being to thwart the (...)
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  44.  45
    Justice in a Changing World.Cecile Fabre - 2007 - Polity.
    Should governments give special rights to ethnic and cultural minorities? Should rich countries open their borders to economic immigrants or transfer resources to poor countries? When framing and implementing economic and environmental policies, should current generations take into account the interests of future generations? If our political community committed a wrong against another group a hundred years ago, do we owe reparations to current members of that group? These are just some of the pressing questions which are fully explored in (...)
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  45. Dispositions and Essences.Claudine Tiercelin - 2007 - In Gnassounou Bruno & Kistler Max (eds.), Dispositions and Causal Powers. Ashgate. pp. 81--101.
     
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  46.  64
    Davidson’s Answer to Kripke’s Sceptic.Olivia Sultanescu & Claudine Verheggen - 2019 - Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 7 (2):8-28.
    According to the sceptic Saul Kripke envisages in his celebrated book on Wittgenstein on rules and private language, there are no facts about an individual that determine what she means by any given expression. If there are no such facts, the question then is, what justifies the claim that she does use expressions meaningfully? Kripke’s answer, in a nutshell, is that she by and large uses her expressions in conformity with the linguistic standards of the community she belongs to. While (...)
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  47.  21
    War Exit.Cécile Fabre - 2015 - Ethics 125 (3):631-652.
    This article argues that we must sever the ethics of war termination from the ethics of war initiation: a belligerent who embarks on a just war at time t1 might be under a duty to sue for peace at t2 before it has achieved its just war aims; conversely, a belligerent who embarks on an unjust war at t1 might acquire a justification for continuing at t2. In the course of making that argument, the article evaluates the various ways in (...)
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  48.  7
    The Responders’ Gender Stereotypes Modulate the Strategic Decision-Making of Proposers Playing the Ultimatum Game.Eve F. Fabre, Mickael Causse, Francesca Pesciarelli & Cristina Cacciari - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
  49.  61
    Global Distributive Justice: An Egalitarian Perspective.Cécile Fabre - 2005 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 35 (sup1):139-164.
  50.  8
    How Can Respectfulness in Medical Professionals Be Increased? A Complex But Important Question.Claudine Clucas & Lindsay St Claire - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):123-133.
    Respectfulness is demanded of doctors and predicts more positive patient health-related outcomes, but research is scarce on ways to promote it. This study explores two ways to conceptualize unconditional respect from medical students, defined as respect paid to people on the basis of their humanity, in order to inform strategies to increase it. Unconditional respect conceptualized as an attitude suggests that unconditional respect and conditional respect are additive, whereas unconditional respect conceptualized as a personality trait suggests that people who are (...)
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