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Profile: Clinton Golding (University of Otago)
  1.  9
    Epistemic Progress: A Construct for Understanding and Evaluating Inquiry.Clinton Golding - 2012 - Educational Theory 62 (6):677-693.
    In this essay Clinton Golding introduces a new construct and area of research — epistemic progress — and argues that it can shed new light on educational inquiry. By clearly distinguishing progress through developing better ideas from progress through developing better inquiry skills , teachers and students can better understand, participate in, and evaluate inquiry. In addition, epistemic progress complements other epistemic constructs, such as “knowledge,” and could provide new insights about different kinds of inquiry or research, as well as (...)
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  2.  11
    The Teacher as Guide: A Conception of the Inquiry Teacher.Clinton Golding - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (1):91-110.
    This article explains how teachers might navigate inquiry learning despite the experience of a constant tension between abandoning their students and controlling them. They do this by conceiving of themselves as guides who decide the path with students, not for them. I build on a conception of teaching as guiding from Burbules, and argue that inquiry teachers should take the particular stance of an expedition-educator (rather than the stance of either a tour-leader or an expedition-leader). They should guide students to (...)
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  3.  14
    We Made Progress: Collective Epistemic Progress in Dialogue Without Consensus.Clinton Golding - 2013 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (3):423-440.
    Class discussions about ethical, social, philosophical and other controversial issues frequently result in disagreement. This leaves a problem: has there been any progress? This article introduces and analyses the concept ‘collective epistemic progress’ in order to resolve this problem. The analysis results in four main ways of understanding, guiding and judging collective epistemic progress in the face of seemingly irreconcilable differences. Although it might seem plausible to analyse and judge collective epistemic progress by the increasing vigour of the dialogue community, (...)
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  4.  18
    A Conception of Philosophical Progress.Clinton Golding - 2011 - Essays in Philosophy 12 (2):200-223.
    There is no consensus about appropriate philosophical method that can be relied on to settle philosophical questions and instead of established findings, there are multiple conflicting arguments and positions, and widespread disagreement and debate. Given this feature of philosophy, it might seem that philosophy has proven to be a worthless endeavour, with no possibility of philosophical progress. The challenge then is to develop a conception of philosophy that reconciles the lack of general or lasting agreement with the possibility of philosophical (...)
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  5.  4
    For Example? A Philosophical Case Study of Some Problems When Abstract Educational Theory Ignores Concrete Practice.Clinton Golding - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (2):476-490.
    In Philosophy of Education we frequently argue for or against different educational theories. Yet, as I illustrate in this analysis of two articles, in order to maintain the abstract theoretical distinctions, we are liable to ignore the concrete details of practice, caricature the theories we reject and make false distinctions. The two articles that I analyse, one from Golding and one from Boghossian, grapple with the pedagogical theories of transmission teaching, constructivism, pragmatism and Socratic pedagogy, in the context of dialogical (...)
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  6.  26
    The Community of Inquiry: Blending Philosophical and Empirical Research.Clinton Golding - 2015 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (2):205-216.
    Philosophical research tends to be done separately from empirical research, but this makes it difficult to tackle questions which require both. To make it easier to address these hybrid research questions, I argue that we should sometimes combine philosophical and empirical investigations. I start by describing a continuum of research methods from data collecting and analysing to philosophical arguing and conceptualising. Then, I outline one possible middle-ground position where research is equally philosophical and empirical: the Community of Inquiry reconceived as (...)
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  7.  52
    The Many Faces of Constructivist Discussion.Clinton Golding - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):467-483.
    Although constructivist discussions in the classroom are often treated as if they were all of the same kind, in this paper I argue that there are subtle but important distinctions that need to be made. An analysis of these distinctions shows that there is a continuum of different constructivist discussions. At one extreme are teacher-directed discussions where students are led to construct the ‘correct’ understanding of a pre-decided conclusion; at the other extreme are unstructured discussions where students are free to (...)
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  8.  42
    Ethics and the Community of Inquiry: Education for Deliberative Democracy - by Burgh, G., Field, T., & Freakley, M.Clinton Golding - 2008 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (3):460–462.
  9.  38
    Making Sense.Clinton Golding - 2009 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (7):814-817.
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  10.  12
    The Philosophy Teacher as Guide.Clinton Golding - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 27:29-37.
    Central to Philosophy for Children is the commitment that children follow their inquiry where it leads. Teacher interventions that introduce questions and problems from the philosophical tradition are problematic for this commitment. They seem to be necessary to scaffold a rigorous inquiry, but they also threaten todirect the inquiry down the teacher’s chosen path rather than the students’. This paper suggests a way to balance following student inquiry where it leads with introducing knowledge from the philosophical tradition. It will be (...)
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  11.  2
    For Example? A Philosophical Case Study of Some Problems When Abstract Educational Theory Ignores Concrete Practice.Clinton Golding - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (4).
    In Philosophy of Education we frequently argue for or against different educational theories. Yet, as I illustrate in this analysis of two articles, in order to maintain the abstract theoretical distinctions, we are liable to ignore the concrete details of practice, caricature the theories we reject and make false distinctions. The two articles that I analyse, one from Golding and one from Boghossian, grapple with the pedagogical theories of transmission teaching, constructivism, pragmatism and Socratic pedagogy, in the context of dialogical (...)
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  12.  21
    Educating Philosophically: The Educational Theory of Philosophy for Children.Clinton Golding - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):413-414.
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  13. Book Review: Textbook of Healthcare Ethics. Erich H. Loewy. Plenum Press, NY, 1996. 309 Pp. ISBN 0‐306‐45240‐5 US$49.50. [REVIEW]Clinton Golding - 1997 - Health Care Analysis 5 (3):249-249.