Results for 'Codou Bop'

12 found
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  1.  3
    Islam and Women's Sexual Health and Rights in Senegal.Codou Bop - 2005 - Muslim World Journal of Human Rights 2 (1).
  2.  2
    ‘Business Unusual’: Building BoP 3.0.Danielle A. Chmielewski, Krzysztof Dembek & Jennifer R. Beckett - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-19.
    With over three billion people currently living below the poverty line, finding better ways to lift people out of poverty is a concern of scholars from a range of disciplines. Within Management Studies, the focus is on developing market-based solutions to poverty alleviation through Bottom/Base-of-the-Pyramid initiatives. To date, these have enjoyed limited success, sometimes even exacerbating the problems they attempt to solve. As a result, there is a growing academic and practitioner push for a third iteration—BoP 3.0—that moves closer to (...)
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  3.  5
    The Dark Side of Fairtrade© in BOP Markets.Linda M. Sama & R. Mitch Casselman - 2013 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 24:112-123.
    Fairtrade-certified products are sold through retailers to consumers who are willing to pay a premium in exchange for assurances that products were produced under acceptable working and environmental conditions, and that farmers were paid a fair market price. While touted as a positive social innovation, the Fairtrade movement has invited critical scrutiny and in its wake, suggestions for improvements in terms of sustainability, transparency, and tangible benefits for producers subsisting in Base of Pyramid markets. In this paper, we uncover the (...)
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  4. Hard Bop: Jazz and Black Music, 1955-1965.David H. Rosenthal - 1994 - Science and Society 58 (2):228-231.
     
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  5.  9
    The “Integrative Justice Model” as Transformative Justice for Base-of-the-Pyramid Marketing.Nicholas Jc Santos, Gene R. Laczniak & Tina M. Facca-Miess - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (4):1-11.
    Writing in the Business and Politics, Santos and Laczniak (Business and Politics 14(1) 2012) formulated a normative, ethical approach to be followed when marketers e ngage impoverished market segments. It is labeled the integrative justice model (IJM). As noted below, that approach called for authentic engagement, co-creation, and customer interest representation, among other elements, when transacting with vulnerable market segments. Basically, the IJM derived certain operational virtues, implied by moral philosophy, to be used when marketing to the poor. But this (...)
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  6.  45
    Foreign Investment and Ethics: How to Contribute to Social Responsibility by Doing Business in Less-Developed Countries. [REVIEW]Roland Bardy, Stephen Drew & Tumenta F. Kennedy - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 106 (3):267-282.
    Do foreign direct investment (FDI) and international business ventures promote positive social and economic development in emerging nations? This question will always prove contentious. First, the impacts differ according to context. Second, the social consequences and spillover effects of knowledge diffusion and technology-sharing may be limited and hard to measure. Third, contributions to enhancing social responsibility and improving living standards in host countries are delayed in effect, causally complex, and also hard to measure. Outcomes often critically depend on collaboration of (...)
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  7.  26
    The Poor as Suppliers of Intellectual Property.Sridevi Shivarajan & Aravind Srinivasan - 2013 - Business Ethics Quarterly 23 (3):381-406.
    We extend the Base of the Pyramid (BoP) poverty-alleviation approach by recognizing the poor as valuable suppliers—specifically of intellectual property. Although the poor possess huge reserves of intellectual property, they are unable to participate in global knowledge networks owing to their illiteracy and poverty. This is a crippling form of social exclusion in today’s growing knowledge economy because it adversely affects their capabilities for advancement at several levels. Providing the poor access to global knowledge networks as rightful participants—as suppliers of (...)
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  8.  7
    The “Integrative Justice Model” as Transformative Justice for Base-of-the-Pyramid Marketing.Tina Facca-Miess, Gene Laczniak & Nicholas Santos - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (4):697-707.
    Writing in the Business and Politics, Santos and Laczniak 2012) formulated a normative, ethical approach to be followed when marketers e ngage impoverished market segments. It is labeled the integrative justice model. As noted below, that approach called for authentic engagement, co-creation, and customer interest representation, among other elements, when transacting with vulnerable market segments. Basically, the IJM derived certain operational virtues, implied by moral philosophy, to be used when marketing to the poor. But this well-intentioned approach raises a significant (...)
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  9.  22
    Evaluating the Social Impact of Bottom of the Pyramid Businesses.R. Bruce Paton - 2007 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:463-466.
    The bottom of the pyramid (BOP) concept suggests that business has a vital role to play in meeting the unmet needs of the 4 billion poorest people on the planet. Serious advances in research on bottom of the pyramid business will require effective evaluation of the social impacts these businesses are having on the people they are supposed to benefit. Evaluation will allow us to identify conditions in which specific business interventions can address unmet needs fairly and effectively. Theory-driven evaluation (...)
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  10.  20
    Corporate Social Responsibility: Linking Bottom of the Pyramid to Market Development?Ramendra Singh, Madhupa Bakshi & Prashant Mishra - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 131 (2):361-373.
    In this article, we develop theoretical and empirical linkages between corporate social responsibility initiatives of business organizations and their market development efforts at the bottom of the pyramid. We use qualitative in-depth interviews of 21 CSR heads of business organizations and its CSR partner organizations in India to explore, develop, and explain plausible theoretical linkages between CSR initiatives of the organizations and its market development efforts at BOP using theory of market separations. Using theoretical frameworks from CSR literature and sub-theory (...)
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  11.  13
    Using the Bass Model to Analyze the Diffusion of Innovations at the Base of the Pyramid.Kokila Doshi & Ryan Ratcliff - 2016 - Business and Society 55 (2):271-298.
    This research note proposes the Bass Model as an empirical tool for analyzing the diffusion of new product and service innovations in Base of the Pyramid markets. This approach allows researchers to test whether factors that seem theoretically relevant to the speed and trajectory of adoption actually matter empirically. The authors model the growth of three BoP success stories using the Bass Model: Patrimonio Hoy, e-Choupal, and Grameen’s Village Phone. In two of the three cases considered, the Bass Model estimates (...)
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  12.  2
    Multinational Firm Strategy and Global Poverty Alleviation.S. R. Chatterjee - 2009 - Journal of Human Values 15 (2):133-152.
    Bottom of the Pyramid strategies recognize for the first time that global companies can contribute to the alleviation of worldwide poverty by adopting non-traditional and mostly non-Western models of business involvement. It is now widely accepted that poverty and hunger arise not because there are no goods or food, but because billions of people lack income to purchase them. It is also a common belief that the private sector can play a significant role in lifting the poor from the margins (...)
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