Results for 'Cognitive inhibition'

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  1.  54
    Cognitive Inhibition and the Conscious Assent to Truth: A Newmanian Perspective.Javier Sánchez-Cañizares - 2016 - Newman Studies Journal 13 (2):40-52.
    When must a specific cognitive habit be called upon to solve a problem? In the subject’s learning process, “knowing-to” is connected with a conscious particular judgment of truth or “aha” moment enacting a new behavioral schema. This paper comments on recent experiments supporting the view that a shift from automatic to controlled forms of inhibition, involving conscious attention, is crucial for detecting errors and activating a new strategy in complex cognitive situations. The part that consciousness plays in (...)
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  2. Hypnotic Suggestibility, Cognitive Inhibition, and Dissociation.Zoltán Dienes, Elizabeth Brown, Sam Hutton, Irving Kirsch, Giuliana Mazzoni & Daniel B. Wright - 2009 - Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):837-847.
    We examined two potential correlates of hypnotic suggestibility: dissociation and cognitive inhibition. Dissociation is the foundation of two of the major theories of hypnosis and other theories commonly postulate that hypnotic responding is a result of attentional abilities . Participants were administered the Waterloo-Stanford Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form C. Under the guise of an unrelated study, 180 of these participants also completed: a version of the Dissociative Experiences Scale that is normally distributed in non-clinical populations; a (...)
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  3.  25
    Emotion Regulation in Depression: Relation to Cognitive Inhibition.Jutta Joormann & Ian H. Gotlib - 2010 - Cognition and Emotion 24 (2):281-298.
  4.  4
    High Schizotypal Individuals Are More Creative? The Mediation Roles of Overinclusive Thinking and Cognitive Inhibition.Lixia Wang, Haiying Long, Jonathan A. Plucker, Qing Wang, Xiaobo Xu & Weiguo Pang - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  5. The Color-Word Stroop Task Does Not Differentiate Cognitive Inhibition Ability Among Esports Gamers of Varying Expertise.Adam J. Toth, Magdalena Kowal & Mark J. Campbell - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  6.  69
    Cognitive Control: Componential and Yet Emergent.Ion Juvina - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):242-246.
    In this commentary, I will argue that the componential and emergent views of cognitive control as defined by Cooper (2010) do not necessarily oppose each other, and I will try to make a case for their interdependence. First, I will use the construct of cognitive inhibition—one of the main componential control functions mentioned in the target articles—to illustrate my line of reasoning. Then, I will comment on how some of the target articles, each from a different perspective, (...)
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  7. fMRI Reveals Reciprocal Inhibition Between Social and Physical Cognitive Domains.Anthony I. Jack, Abigail Dawson, Katelyn Begany, Regina Leckie, Kevin Barry, Angela Ciccia & Abraham Snyder - 2013 - NeuroImage.
  8.  7
    Prefrontal Cognitive Processes: Working Memory and Inhibition in the Antisaccade Task.Ralph J. Roberts, Lisa D. Hager & Christine Heron - 1994 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 123 (4):374-393.
  9.  7
    Roles of Activation and Inhibition in Sex Differences in Cognitive Abilities.Donald M. Broverman, Edward L. Klaiber & Yutaka Kobayashi - 1968 - Psychological Review 75 (1):23-50.
  10.  3
    Neural Correlates of Saccadic Inhibition in Healthy Elderly and Patients with Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment.K. K. Alichniewicz, F. Brunner, H. H. Klünemann & M. W. Greenlee - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4.
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  11.  4
    Lateral Inhibition and Cognitive Masking: A Neuropsychological Theory of Attention.Roc E. Walley & Theodore D. Weiden - 1973 - Psychological Review 80 (4):284-302.
  12.  23
    A Closer Look at Cognitive Control: Differences in Resource Allocation During Updating, Inhibition and Switching as Revealed by Pupillometry.Eefje W. M. Rondeel, Henk van Steenbergen, Rob W. Holland & Ad van Knippenberg - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  13.  5
    Linking Cognitive Measures of Response Inhibition and Reward Sensitivity to Trait Impulsivity.Ainara Jauregi, Klaus Kessler & Stefanie Hassel - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  14.  6
    Comments on "Roles of Activation and Inhibition in Sex Differences in Cognitive Abilities" by D. M. Broverman, E. L. Klaiber, Y. Kobayshi, and W. Vogel. [REVIEW]Mary B. Parlee - 1972 - Psychological Review 79 (2):180-184.
  15.  10
    Slow Walking on a Treadmill Desk Does Not Negatively Affect Executive Abilities: An Examination of Cognitive Control, Conflict Adaptation, Response Inhibition, and Post-Error Slowing.Michael J. Larson, James D. LeCheminant, Kaylie Carbine, Kyle R. Hill, Edward Christenson, Travis Masterson & Rick LeCheminant - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  16.  8
    "Roles of Activation and Inhibition in Sex Differences in Cognitive Abilities": Erratum.D. M. Broverman, E. L. Klaiber & Y. Kobayahi - 1968 - Psychological Review 75 (3):259-259.
  17.  6
    Comment on Roles of Activation and Inhibition in Sex Differences in Cognitive Abilities.G. Singer & R. B. Montgomery - 1969 - Psychological Review 76 (3):325-327.
  18.  4
    Reply to the "Comment" by Singer and Montgomery on "Roles of Activation and Inhibition in Sex Differences in Cognitive Abilities.".Donald M. Broverman, Edward L. Klaiber, Yutaka Kobayashi & William Vogel - 1969 - Psychological Review 76 (3):328-331.
  19. Cognitive Incompatibility-Automatic Mutual Exclusion or Mutual Inhibition.A. Irannejad - 1988 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 26 (6):492-492.
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  20. Cognitive Control: Componential or Emergent?Richard P. Cooper - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (4):598-613.
    The past 25 years have witnessed an increasing awareness of the importance of cognitive control in the regulation of complex behavior. It now sits alongside attention, memory, language, and thinking as a distinct domain within cognitive psychology. At the same time it permeates each of these sibling domains. This introduction reviews recent work on cognitive control in an attempt to provide a context for the fundamental question addressed within this topic: Is cognitive control to be understood (...)
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  21. Analogy as Relational Priming: A Developmental and Computational Perspective on the Origins of a Complex Cognitive Skill.Robert Leech, Denis Mareschal & Richard P. Cooper - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (4):357-378.
    The development of analogical reasoning has traditionally been understood in terms of theories of adult competence. This approach emphasizes structured representations and structure mapping. In contrast, we argue that by taking a developmental perspective, analogical reasoning can be viewed as the product of a substantially different cognitive ability – relational priming. To illustrate this, we present a computational (here connectionist) account where analogy arises gradually as a by-product of pattern completion in a recurrent network. Initial exposure to a situation (...)
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  22.  28
    The Multiple, Interacting Levels of Cognitive Systems Perspective on Group Cognition.Robert L. Goldstone & Georg Theiner - 2017 - Philosophical Psychology 30 (3):334-368.
    In approaching the question of whether groups of people can have cognitive capacities that are fundamentally different than the cognitive capacities of the individuals within the group, we lay out a Multiple, Interactive Levels of Cognitive Systems (MILCS) framework. The goal of MILCS is to explain the kinds of cognitive processes typically studied by cognitive scientists, such as perception, attention, memory, categorization, decision making, problem solving, and judgment. Rather than focusing on high-level constructs such as (...)
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  23.  28
    Factor Analysis and Validation of a Self-Report Measure of Impaired Fear Inhibition.Tom J. Barry, Helen M. Baker, Christine H. M. Chiu, Barbara C. Y. Lo & Jennifer Y. F. Lau - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (3):512-523.
    ABSTRACTDifficulties with inhibiting fear have been associated with the emergence of anxiety problems and poor response to cognitive–behavioural treatment. Fear inhibition problems measured using experimental paradigms involving aversive stimuli may be inappropriate for vulnerable samples and may not capture fear inhibition problems evident in everyday life. We present the Fear Inhibition Questionnaire, a self-report measure of fear inhibition abilities. We assess the FIQ’s factor structure across two cultures and how well it correlates with fear (...) indices derived experimentally. Adolescent participants from Hong Kong and England completed the FIQ, with the English participants also completing a conditioning and extinction task to assess fear inhibition problems. Across both cultures, the FIQ showed a single factor structure and low FIQ scores, or worse fear inhibition problems, were associated with self-reports of heightened anxiety. Correlation of FIQ scores with experimental indices, whi... (shrink)
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  24.  16
    The Development of Cognitive Control in Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.Heather M. Shapiro, Flora Tassone, Nimrah S. Choudhary & Tony J. Simon - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    © 2014 Shapiro, Tassone, Choudhary and Simon.Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome is caused by the most common human microdeletion, and it is associated with cognitive impairments across many domains. While impairments in cognitive control have been described in children with 22q11.2DS, the nature and development of these impairments are not clear. Children with 22q11.2DS and typically developing children were tested on four well-validated tasks aimed at measuring specific foundational components of cognitive control: response inhibition, cognitive flexibility, (...)
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  25.  22
    Cpu Or Self-Reference: Discerning Between Cognitive Science and Quantum Functionalist Models of Mentation.Kim Mccarthy & Amit Goswami - 1993 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 14 (1):13-26.
    The quantum functionalist model of mentation provides an explanation of conscious and unconscious perception without the postulation of a central processing unit . Based on Goswami's idealist interpretation of quantum mechanics, the quantum model posits a dual quantum/classical system for the mind-brain with which consciousness is linked via self-reference. A comparative analysis of word-sense disambiguation data is conducted with a cognitive science model derived from the Posner and Snyder facilitation and inhibition and the Rummelhart, McClelland, and PDP group's (...)
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  26.  7
    Enhancement of Executive Control Through Short-Term Cognitive Training: Far-Transfer Effects on General Fluid Intelligence.Edward Nęcka, Michał Nowak & Radosław Wujcik - 2017 - Polish Psychological Bulletin 48 (1):72-78.
    We predicted that short-term training of executive control would improve both cognitive control itself and general fluid intelligence. We randomly assigned 120 high school students to the experimental and control groups. The former underwent a 14-day training of four executive functions: interference resolution, response inhibition, task switching, and goal monitoring. The latter did not train anything. The training significantly improved cognitive control and IQ. The control group also improved their IQ scores but gained less than the experimental (...)
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  27.  17
    Saccadic Inhibition in Reading.Eyal M. Reingold & Dave M. Stampe - unknown
    In 5 experiments, participants read text that was briefly replaced by a transient image for 33 ms at random intervals. A decrease in saccadic frequency, referred to as saccadic inhibition, occurred as early as 60 –70 ms following the onset of abrupt changes in visual input. It was demonstrated that the saccadic inhibition was influenced by the saliency of the visual event (Experiment 3) and was not produced in response to abrupt but irrelevant auditory stimuli (Experiment 1). Display (...)
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  28.  7
    The Shared and Unique Genetic Relationship Between Mental Well-Being, Depression and Anxiety Symptoms and Cognitive Function in Healthy Twins.Kylie M. Routledge, Karen L. O. Burton, Leanne M. Williams, Anthony Harris, Peter R. Schofield, C. Richard Clark & Justine M. Gatt - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (7):1465-1479.
    Alterations to cognitive function are often reported with depression and anxiety symptoms, yet few studies have examined the same associations with mental well-being. This study examined the association between mental well-being, depression and anxiety symptoms and cognitive function in 1502 healthy adult monozygotic and dizygotic twins, and the shared/unique contribution of genetic and environmental variance. Using linear mixed models, mental well-being was positively associated with sustained attention, inhibition, cognitive flexibility, motor coordination and working memory, whereas depression (...)
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  29.  2
    When Affect Supports Cognitive Control – A Working Memory Perspective.Alina Kolańczyk - 2016 - Polish Psychological Bulletin 47 (1):29-42.
    The paper delineates a study of executive functions, construed as procedural working memory, from a motivational perspective. Since WM theories and motivation theories are both concerned with purposive activity, the role of implicit evaluations observed in goal pursuit can be anticipated to arise also in the context of cognitive control, e.g., during the performance of the Stroop task. The role of positive and negative affect in goal pursuit consists in controlling attention resources according to the goal and situational requirements. (...)
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  30.  65
    Inhibition and the Right Inferior Frontal Cortex.Adam R. Aron, Trevor W. Robbins & Russell A. Poldrack - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (4):170-177.
  31. Qualitative Differences Between Conscious and Nonconscious Processing? On Inverse Priming Induced by Masked Arrows.Rolf Verleger, Piotr Jaskowski, Aytaç Aydemir, Rob H. J. van der Lubbe & Margriet Groen - 2004 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 133 (4):494-515.
  32.  29
    Inhibition and the Right Inferior Frontal Cortex: One Decade On.Adam R. Aron, Trevor W. Robbins & Russell A. Poldrack - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (4):177-185.
  33.  71
    Inhibition of Return.Raymond M. Klein - 2000 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (4):138-147.
  34.  59
    Response Inhibition in the Stop-Signal Paradigm.Frederick Verbruggen & Gordon D. Logan - 2008 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (11):418-424.
  35.  66
    The Unified Theory of Repression.Matthew Hugh Erdelyi - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):499-511.
    Repression has become an empirical fact that is at once obvious and problematic. Fragmented clinical and laboratory traditions and disputed terminology have resulted in a Babel of misunderstandings in which false distinctions are imposed (e.g., between repression and suppression) and necessary distinctions not drawn (e.g., between the mechanism and the use to which it is put, defense being just one). “Repression” was introduced by Herbart to designate the (nondefensive) inhibition of ideas by other ideas in their struggle for consciousness. (...)
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  36.  14
    The Recruitment of Shifting and Inhibition in On‐Line Science and Mathematics Tasks.Stella Vosniadou, Dimitrios Pnevmatikos, Nikos Makris, Despina Lepenioti, Kalliopi Eikospentaki, Anna Chountala & Giorgos Kyrianakis - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (6):1860-1886.
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  37. Balancing Long-Term Reinforcement and Short-Term Inhibition.Christian Lebiere & Bradley J. Best - 2009 - In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society.
     
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  38. Modelling the Correlation Between Two Putative Inhibition Tasks: An Analytic Approach.Eddy J. Davelaar & Richard P. Cooper - 2010 - In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society.
  39. The Dynamic Developmental Theory of ADHD: Reflections From a Cognitive Energetic Model Standpoint.Joseph A. Sergeant - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):442-443.
    “A dynamic developmental theory of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) predominantly hyperactive/impulsive and combined subtypes” is a major contribution linking comparative psychology with clinical developmental neuropsychopathology. In this commentary, I place some critical remarks concerning the theory's explanation of sleep problems, inhibition, error monitoring, and motor control.
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  40.  29
    Inhibition, Disinhibition, and the Control of Action in Tourette Syndrome.Georgina M. Jackson, Amelia Draper, Katherine Dyke, Sophia E. Pépés & Stephen R. Jackson - 2015 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (11):655-665.
  41.  19
    The Influence of Cognitive and Emotional Suppression on Overgeneral Autobiographical Memory Retrieval.Sang Quang Phung & Richard A. Bryant - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (3):965-974.
    Over-general autobiographical memory retrieval is characterized by retrieval of categoric autobiographical memories. According to the CarFAX model, this tendency may result from avoidance which functions to protect the person against recalling details of upsetting memories. This study tested whether avoidance strategies impact on the ability to retrieve specific autobiographical memories. Healthy participants watched a negative video clip and were instructed to either suppress any thought , suppress any feeling , or think and feel naturally in response to the video. Participants (...)
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  42.  7
    The Role of Inhibition in Avoiding Distraction by Salient Stimuli.Nicholas Gaspelin & Steven J. Luck - 2018 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 22 (1):79-92.
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  43. Retrieval Inhibition in Episodic Recall: Effects on Feature Binding.Karl-Heinz Bauml - 2006 - In Hubert Zimmer, Axel Mecklinger & Ulman Lindenberger (eds.), Handbook of Binding and Memory: Perspectives From Cognitive Neuroscience. Oxford University Press.
     
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  44. Concepts: Where Cognitive Science Went Wrong.Jerry A. Fodor - 1998 - Oxford University Press.
    The renowned philosopher Jerry Fodor, a leading figure in the study of the mind for more than twenty years, presents a strikingly original theory on the basic constituents of thought. He suggests that the heart of cognitive science is its theory of concepts, and that cognitive scientists have gone badly wrong in many areas because their assumptions about concepts have been mistaken. Fodor argues compellingly for an atomistic theory of concepts, deals out witty and pugnacious demolitions of rival (...)
  45. Jaspers on Drives, Wants and Volitions.Ulrich Diehl - 2012 - Jahrbuch der Österreichischen Karl-Jaspers-Gesellschaft 25:101-125.
    In § 6 of his General Psychopathology (1st edition 1913) Jaspers distinguished between drives, wants and volitions as three different and irreducible kinds of motivational phenomena which are involved in human decision making and which may lead to successful actions. He has characterized the qualitative differences between volitions in comparison with basic vital drives and emotional wants such as being (a.) intentional, (b.) content-specific and (b.) directed towards concrete objects and actions as goals. Furthermore, Jaspers has presented and discussed three (...)
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  46.  44
    Marr's Levels Revisited: Understanding How Brains Break.Valerie G. Hardcastle & Kiah Hardcastle - 2015 - Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (2):259-273.
    While the research programs in early cognitive science and artificial intelligence aimed to articulate what cognition was in ideal terms, much research in contemporary computational neuroscience looks at how and why brains fail to function as they should ideally. This focus on impairment affects how we understand David Marr's hypothesized three levels of understanding. In this essay, we suggest some refinements to Marr's distinctions using a population activity model of cortico-striatal circuitry exploring impulsivity and behavioral inhibition as a (...)
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  47.  77
    Loops, Constitution and Cognitive Extension.S. Orestis Palermos - 2014 - Cognitive Systems Research 27:25-41.
    The ‘causal-constitution’ fallacy, the ‘cognitive bloat’ worry, and the persisting theoretical confusion about the fundamental difference between the hypotheses of embedded (HEMC) and extended (HEC) cognition are three interrelated worries, whose common point—and the problem they accentuate—is the lack of a principled criterion of constitution. Attempting to address the ‘causal-constitution’ fallacy, mathematically oriented philosophers of mind have previously suggested that the presence of non-linear relations between the inner and the outer contributions is sufficient for cognitive extension. The abstract (...)
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  48. Extended Mind and Cognitive Enhancement: Moral Aspects of Cognitive Artifacts.Richard Heersmink - 2017 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 16 (1):17-32.
    This article connects philosophical debates about cognitive enhancement and situated cognition. It does so by focusing on moral aspects of enhancing our cognitive abilities with the aid of external artifacts. Such artifacts have important moral dimensions that are addressed neither by the cognitive enhancement debate nor situated cognition theory. In order to fill this gap in the literature, three moral aspects of cognitive artifacts are singled out: their consequences for brains, cognition, and culture; their moral status; (...)
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  49. Cognitive Integration: Mind and Cognition Unbounded.Richard Menary - 2007 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    In Cognitive Integration: Attacking The Bounds of Cognition Richard Menary argues that the real pay-off from extended-mind-style arguments is not a new form of externalism in the philosophy of mind, but a view in which the 'internal' and 'external' aspects of cognition are integrated into a whole. Menary argues that the manipulation of external vehicles constitutes cognitive processes and that cognition is hybrid: internal and external processes and vehicles complement one another in the completion of cognitive tasks. (...)
     
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  50.  11
    Subliminal Food Images Compromise Superior Working Memory Performance in Women with Restricting Anorexia Nervosa.Samantha J. Brooks, Owen G. O’Daly, Rudolf Uher, Helgi B. Schiöth, Janet Treasure & Iain C. Campbell - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (2):751-763.
    Prefrontal cortex is dysregulated in women with restricting anorexia nervosa . It is not known whether appetitive non-conscious stimuli bias cognitive responses in those with RAN. Thirteen women with RAN and 20 healthy controls completed a dorsolateral PFC working memory task and an anterior cingulate cortex conflict task, while masked subliminal food, aversive and neutral images were presented. During the DLPFC task, accuracy was higher in the RAN compared to the HC group, but superior performance was compromised when subliminal (...)
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