Results for 'Cognitive neuroscience'

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  1. The Cognitive Neuroscience Revolution.Worth Boone & Gualtiero Piccinini - 2016 - Synthese 193 (5):1509-1534.
    We outline a framework of multilevel neurocognitive mechanisms that incorporates representation and computation. We argue that paradigmatic explanations in cognitive neuroscience fit this framework and thus that cognitive neuroscience constitutes a revolutionary break from traditional cognitive science. Whereas traditional cognitive scientific explanations were supposed to be distinct and autonomous from mechanistic explanations, neurocognitive explanations aim to be mechanistic through and through. Neurocognitive explanations aim to integrate computational and representational functions and structures across multiple levels (...)
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  2. The Cognitive Neurosciences.Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.) - 1995 - MIT Press.
  3.  11
    The Cognitive Neuroscience of Insight.John Kounios - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  4.  33
    The Cognitive Neuroscience of Working Memory.Naoyuki Osaka, Robert H. Logie & Mark D'Esposito (eds.) - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Working memory has been one of the most intensively studied systems in cognitive psychology. The Cognitive Neuroscience of Working Memory brings together world class researchers from around the world to summarise our current knowledge of this field, and directions for future research.
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  5.  21
    The Cognitive Neuroscience of Constructive Memory: Remembering the Past and Imagining the Future.Daniel L. Schacter & Donna Rose Addis - 2008 - In Jon Driver, Patrick Haggard & Tim Shallice (eds.), Mental Processes in the Human Brain. Oxford University Press.
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  6.  60
    Social Cognitive Neuroscience of Empathy: Concepts, Circuits, and Genes.Henrik Walter - 2012 - Emotion Review 4 (1):9-17.
    This article reviews concepts of, as well as neurocognitive and genetic studies on, empathy. Whereas cognitive empathy can be equated with affective theory of mind, that is, with mentalizing the emotions of others, affective empathy is about sharing emotions with others. The neural circuits underlying different forms of empathy do overlap but also involve rather specific brain areas for cognitive (ventromedial prefrontal cortex) and affective (anterior insula, midcingulate cortex, and possibly inferior frontal gyrus) empathy. Furthermore, behavioral and imaging (...)
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  7.  57
    The Cognitive Neuroscience of Vision.Martha J. Farah - 2000 - Blackwell.
    The Cognitive Neuroscience of Vision begins by introducing the reader to the anatomy of the eye and visual cortex and then proceeds to discuss image and...
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  8. Towards a Cognitive Neuroscience of Consciousness: Basic Evidence and a Workspace Framework.Stanislas Dehaene & Lionel Naccache - 2001 - Cognition 79 (1):1-37.
  9.  67
    The Cognitive Neurosciences III.Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.) - 2004 - MIT Press.
    "The Cognitive Neurosciences III is a magnificent accomplishment. It covers topics trom ions to consciousness, from reflexes to social psychology. ...
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  10.  68
    Cognitive Neuroscience of Self-Regulation Failure.Todd F. Heatherton & Dylan D. Wagner - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (3):132-139.
  11. Embodied Cognitive Neuroscience and its Consequences for Psychiatry.Thomas Fuchs - 2009 - Poiesis and Praxis 6 (3-4):219-233.
    Recent years have seen the emergence of a new interdisciplinary field called embodied or enactive cognitive science. Whereas traditional representationalism rests on a fixed inside–outside distinction, the embodied cognition perspective views mind and brain as a biological system that is rooted in body experience and interaction with other individuals. Embodiment refers to both the embedding of cognitive processes in brain circuitry and to the origin of these processes in an organism’s sensory–motor experience. Thus, action and perception are no (...)
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  12.  40
    Computational Cognitive Neuroscience.Carlos Zednik - forthcoming - In Mark Sprevak & Matteo Colombo (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of the Computational Mind. Routledge.
    This chapter provides an overview of the basic research strategies and analytic techniques deployed in computational cognitive neuroscience. On the one hand, “top-down” strategies are used to infer, from formal characterizations of behavior and cognition, the computational properties of underlying neural mechanisms. On the other hand, “bottom-up” research strategies are used to identify neural mechanisms and to reconstruct their computational capacities. Both of these strategies rely on experimental techniques familiar from other branches of neuroscience, including functional magnetic (...)
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  13.  45
    Cognitive Neuroscience of Emotion.Richard D. R. Lane, L. Nadel, G. L. Ahern, J. Allen & Alfred W. Kaszniak (eds.) - 2000 - Oxford University Press.
    This book, a member of the Series in Affective Science, is a unique interdisciplinary sequence of articles on the cognitive neuroscience of emotion by some of ...
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  14. Doing Cognitive Neuroscience: A Third Way.Frances Egan & Robert J. Matthews - 2006 - Synthese 153 (3):377-391.
    The “top-down” and “bottom-up” approaches have been thought to exhaust the possibilities for doing cognitive neuroscience. We argue that neither approach is likely to succeed in providing a theory that enables us to understand how cognition is achieved in biological creatures like ourselves. We consider a promising third way of doing cognitive neuroscience, what might be called the “neural dynamic systems” approach, that construes cognitive neuroscience as an autonomous explanatory endeavor, aiming to characterize in (...)
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  15.  26
    The Cognitive Neuroscience of Consciousness.Stanislas Dehaene (ed.) - 2001 - MIT Press.
    This book investigates the philosophical, empirical, and theoretical bases on which a cognitive neuroscience of consciousness can be founded.
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  16. The Cognitive Neuroscience of Sleep: Neuronal Systems, Consciousness and Learning.J. Allan Hobson & Edward F. Pace-Schott - 2002 - Nature Reviews Neuroscience 3:679-93.
  17. Cognitive Neuroscience: The Troubled Marriage of Cognitive Science and Neuroscience.Richard P. Cooper & Tim Shallice - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):398-406.
    We discuss the development of cognitive neuroscience in terms of the tension between the greater sophistication in cognitive concepts and methods of the cognitive sciences and the increasing power of more standard biological approaches to understanding brain structure and function. There have been major technological developments in brain imaging and advances in simulation, but there have also been shifts in emphasis, with topics such as thinking, consciousness, and social cognition becoming fashionable within the brain sciences. The (...)
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  18.  23
    Cognitive Neuroscience of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Its Clinical Translation.Katya Rubia - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  19. The Cognitive Neuroscience of Consciousness, Mysticism and Psi.B. L. Lancaster - forthcoming - International Journal of Transpersonal Studies.
    The greatest contemporary challenge in the arena of cognitive neuroscience concerns the relation between consciousness and the brain. Over recent years the focus of work in this area has switched from the analysis of diverse spatial regions of the brain to that of the timing of neural events. It appears that two conditions are necessary in order for neural events to become correlated with conscious experience. First, the firing of assemblies of neurones must achieve a degree of coherence, (...)
     
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  20.  40
    A Cognitive Neuroscience Hypothesis of Mood and Depression.Moshe Bar - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (11):456.
  21. Towards a Cognitive Neuroscience of Intentionality.Alex Morgan & Gualtiero Piccinini - 2018 - Minds and Machines 28 (1):119-139.
    We situate the debate on intentionality within the rise of cognitive neuroscience and argue that cognitive neuroscience can explain intentionality. We discuss the explanatory significance of ascribing intentionality to representations. At first, we focus on views that attempt to render such ascriptions naturalistic by construing them in a deflationary or merely pragmatic way. We then contrast these views with staunchly realist views that attempt to naturalize intentionality by developing theories of content for representations in terms of (...)
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  22. Model-Based Cognitive Neuroscience: Multifield Mechanistic Integration in Practice.Mark Povich - 2019 - Theory & Psychology 5 (29):640–656.
    Autonomist accounts of cognitive science suggest that cognitive model building and theory construction (can or should) proceed independently of findings in neuroscience. Common functionalist justifications of autonomy rely on there being relatively few constraints between neural structure and cognitive function (e.g., Weiskopf, 2011). In contrast, an integrative mechanistic perspective stresses the mutual constraining of structure and function (e.g., Piccinini & Craver, 2011; Povich, 2015). In this paper, I show how model-based cognitive neuroscience (MBCN) epitomizes (...)
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  23. Cognitive Neuroscience of Emotion.G. L. Clore & A. Ortony - 2000 - In Richard D. R. Lane, L. Nadel, G. L. Ahern, J. Allen & Alfred W. Kaszniak (eds.), Cognitive Neuroscience of Emotion. Oxford University Press. pp. 24--61.
  24. The Cognitive Neuroscience of Psychopathy and Implications for Judgments of Responsibility.R. James R. Blair - 2008 - Neuroethics 1 (3):149-157.
    Psychopathy is a developmental disorder associated with specific forms of emotional dysfunction and an increased risk for both frustration-based reactive aggression and goal-directed instrumental antisocial behavior. While the full behavioral manifestation of the disorder is under considerable social influence, the basis of this disorder appears to be genetic. At the neural level, individuals with psychopathy show atypical responding within the amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Moreover, the roles of the amygdala in stimulus-reinforcement learning and responding to emotional expressions and vmPFC (...)
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  25.  88
    Social Cognitive Neuroscience: Where Are We Heading?Sarah-Jayne Blakemore, Joel Winston & Uta Frith - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (5):216-222.
  26.  37
    Cognitive Neuroscience 2.0: Building a Cumulative Science of Human Brain Function.Tal Yarkoni, Russell A. Poldrack, David C. Van Essen & Tor D. Wager - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (11):489-496.
  27. The Cognitive Neurosciences.E. Tulving & Dans Ms Gazzaniga - 1995 - In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences. MIT Press.
     
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  28. A Cognitive Neuroscience Framework for Understanding Causal Reasoning and the Law.Jonathan A. Fugelsang & Kevin N. Dunbar - 2006 - In Semir Zeki & Oliver Goodenough (eds.), Law and the Brain. Oxford University Press. pp. 157--166.
  29.  20
    Cognitive Neuroscience of Human Counterfactual Reasoning.Nicole Van Hoeck - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  30.  88
    Connecting Education and Cognitive Neuroscience: Where Will the Journey Take Us?Daniel Ansari, Donna Coch & Bert De Smedt - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):37-42.
    In recent years there have been growing calls for forging greater connections between education and cognitive neuroscience. As a consequence great hopes for the application of empirical research on the human brain to educational problems have been raised. In this article we contend that the expectation that results from cognitive neuroscience research will have a direct and immediate impact on educational practice are shortsighted and unrealistic. Instead, we argue that an infrastructure needs to be created, principally (...)
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  31.  4
    Philosophy of Cognitive Neuroscience: Causal Explanations, Mechanisms and Experimental Manipulations.Lena Kästner - 2017 - De Gruyter.
    How do cognitive neuroscientists explain phenomena like memory or language processing? This book examines the different kinds of experiments and manipulative research strategies involved in understanding and eventually explaining such phenomena. Against this background, it evaluates contemporary accounts of scientific explanation, specifically the mechanistic and interventionist accounts, and finds them to be crucially incomplete. Besides, mechanisms and interventions cannot actually be combined in the way usually done in the literature. This book offers solutions to both these problems based on (...)
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  32.  23
    19 Cognitive Neuroscience and the Structure of the Moral Mind.Joshua Greene - 2005 - In Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence & Stephen P. Stich (eds.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents. Oxford University Press. pp. 1--338.
    This chapter discusses neurocognitive work relevant to moral psychology and the proposition that innate factors make important contributions to moral judgment. It reviews various sources of evidence for an innate moral faculty, before presenting brain-imaging data in support of the same conclusion. It is argued that our moral thought is the product of an interaction between some ‘gut-reaction’ moral emotions and our capacity for abstract reflection.
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  33.  38
    The Cognitive Neuroscience of Art: A Preliminary fMRI Observation.Robert L. Solso - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (8-9):8-9.
    The perception and cognition of art, a venture done effortlessly by all members of our species, is a complicated affair in which visual perception, brain structures, sensory reasoning, and aesthetic evaluation are made in less time that it takes to read this sentence. Only recently, through perceptual/brain studies, have we begun to understand the many neurological sub-routines involved in visual perception. The discoveries made in cognitive neuroscience laboratories have helped us better understand the perception of everyday visual phenomena, (...)
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  34.  86
    Can Cognitive Neuroscience Ground a Science of Learning?Anthony E. Kelly - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):17-23.
    In this article, I review recent findings in cognitive neuroscience in learning, particularly in the learning of mathematics and of reading. I argue that while cognitive neuroscience is in its infancy as a field, theories of learning will need to incorporate and account for this growing body of empirical data.
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  35.  40
    History of Cognitive Neuroscience.Maxwell R. Bennett & Peter M. S. Hacker - unknown
    History of Cognitive Neuroscience documents the major neuroscientific experiments and theories over the last century and a half in the domain of cognitive neuroscience, and evaluates the cogency of the conclusions that have been drawn from them. Provides a companion work to the highly acclaimed Philosophical Foundations of Neuroscience – combining scientific detail with philosophical insights Views the evolution of brain science through the lens of its principal figures and experiments Addresses philosophical criticism of Bennett (...)
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  36.  25
    Cognitive Neuroscience 2.0: Building a Cumulative Science of Human Brain Function.Tor D. Wager Tal Yarkoni, Russell A. Poldrack, David C. Van Essen - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (11):489.
  37.  60
    Cognitive Neuroscience and Moral Decision-Making: Guide or Set Aside?Derek Leben - 2011 - Neuroethics 4 (2):163-174.
    It is by now a well-supported hypothesis in cognitive neuroscience that there exists a functional network for the moral appraisal of situations. However, there is a surprising disagreement amongst researchers about the significance of this network for moral actions, decisions, and behavior. Some researchers suggest that we should uncover those ethics [that are built into our brains ], identify them, and live more fully by them, while others claim that we should often do the opposite, viewing the (...) neuroscience of morality more like a science of pathology. To analyze and evaluate the disagreement, this paper will investigate some of its possible sources. These may include theoretical confusions about levels of explanation in cognitive science, or different senses of ‘morality’ that researchers are looking to explain. Other causes of the debate may come from empirical assumptions about how possible or preferable it is to separate intuitive moral appraisal from moral decisions. Although we will tentatively favor the ‘Set Aside’ approach, the questions outlined here are open areas of ongoing research, and this paper will be confined to outlining the position space of the debate rather than definitively resolving it. (shrink)
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  38.  1
    Mental Mechanisms: Philosophical Perspectives on Cognitive Neuroscience.William Bechtel - 2007 - Psychology Press.
    A variety of scientific disciplines have set as their task explaining mental activities, recognizing that in some way these activities depend upon our brain. But, until recently, the opportunities to conduct experiments directly on our brains were limited. As a result, research efforts were split between disciplines such as cognitive psychology, linguistics, and artificial intelligence that investigated behavior, while disciplines such as neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and genetics experimented on the brains of non-human animals. In recent decades these disciplines integrated, and (...)
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  39.  38
    Cognitive Neuroscience of Deductive Reasoning.Vinod Goel - 2005 - In K. Holyoak & B. Morrison (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Thinking and Reasoning. Cambridge University Press. pp. 475--492.
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  40.  49
    Empathy and Instinct: Cognitive Neuroscience and Folk Psychology.Anne Jaap Jacobson - 2009 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 52 (5):467-482.
    Might we have an instinctive tendency to perform helpful actions? This paper explores a model under development in cognitive neuroscience that enables us to understand what instinctive, helpful actions might look like. The account that emerges puts some pressure on key concepts in the philosophical understanding of folk psychology. In developing the contrast, a notion of embodied beliefs is introduced; it arguably fits folk conceptions better than philosophical ones. One upshot is that Humean insights into the role of (...)
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  41.  23
    A Cognitive Neuroscience Approach to Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Social Phobia.Karina S. Blair & R. J. R. Blair - 2012 - Emotion Review 4 (2):133-138.
    Generalized anxiety disorder and social phobia are major anxiety disorders identified by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition. They are comorbid, overlap in symptoms, yet present with distinct features. Both have also been explained in terms of conditioning-based models. However, there is little reasoning currently to believe that GAD in adulthood reflects heightened conditionability or heightened threat processing—though patients with SP may show heightened processing of social threat stimuli. Moreover, the computational architectures that maintain these disorders (...)
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  42.  42
    Imitation: Is Cognitive Neuroscience Solving the Correspondence Problem?Marcel Brass & Cecilia Heyes - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (10):489-495.
  43.  41
    Experimental Knowledge in Cognitive Neuroscience.Emrah Aktunc - 2011 - Dissertation, Virginia Tech
    This is a work in the epistemology of functional neuroimaging (fNI) and it applies the error-statistical (ES) philosophy to inferential problems in fNI to formulate and address these problems. This gives us a clear, accurate, and more complete understanding of what we can learn from fNI and how we can learn it. I review the works in the epistemology of fNI which I group into two categories; the first category consists of discussions of the theoretical significance of fNI findings and (...)
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  44.  31
    Radical Embodied Cognitive Neuroscience: Addressing “Grand Challenges” of the Mind Sciences.Luis H. Favela - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8:01-10.
    It is becoming ever more accepted that investigations of mind span the brain, body, and environment. To broaden the scope of what is relevant in such investigations is to increase the amount of data scientists must reckon with. Thus, a major challenge facing scientists who study the mind is how to make big data intelligible both within and between fields. One way to face this challenge is to structure the data within a framework and to make it intelligible by means (...)
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  45. Experimentation in Cognitive Neuroscience and Cognitive Neurobiology.Jacqueline Anne Sullivan - 2015 - In Jens Clausen Neil Levy (ed.), Handbook on Neuroethics. Springer.
    Neuroscience is a laboratory-based science that spans multiple levels of analysis from molecular genetics to behavior. At every level of analysis experiments are designed in order to answer empirical questions about phenomena of interest. Understanding the nature and structure of experimentation in neuroscience is fundamental for assessing the quality of the evidence produced by such experiments and the kinds of claims that are warranted by the data. This article provides a general conceptual framework for thinking about evidence and (...)
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  46. Toward a Cognitive Neuroscience of Metacognition.Arthur P. Shimamura - 2000 - Consciousness and Cognition 9 (2):313-323.
    The relationship between metacognition and executive control is explored. According to an analysis by Fernandez-Duque, Baird, and Posner (this issue), metacognitive regulation involves attention, conflict resolution, error correction, inhibitory control, and emotional regulation. These aspects of metacognition are presumed to be mediated by a neural circuit involving midfrontal brain regions. An evaluation of the proposal by Fernandez-Duque et al. is made, and it is suggested that there is considerable convergence of issues associated with metacognition, executive control, working memory, and frontal (...)
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  47.  43
    Intentional Concepts in Cognitive Neuroscience.Samuli Pöyhönen - 2014 - Philosophical Explorations 17 (1):93-109.
    In this article, I develop an account of the use of intentional predicates in cognitive neuroscience explanations. As pointed out by Maxwell Bennett and Peter Hacker, intentional language abounds in neuroscience theories. According to Bennett and Hacker, the subpersonal use of intentional predicates results in conceptual confusion. I argue against this overly strong conclusion by evaluating the contested language use in light of its explanatory function. By employing conceptual resources from the contemporary philosophy of science, I show (...)
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  48. Model-Based Theorizing in Cognitive Neuroscience.Elizabeth Irvine - 2016 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 67 (1):143-168.
    Weisberg and Godfrey-Smith distinguish between two forms of theorising: data-driven ‘abstract direct representation’ and modeling. The key difference is that when using a data-driven approach, theories are intended to represent specific phenomena, so directly represent them, while models may not be intended to represent anything, so represent targets indirectly, if at all. The aim here is to compare and analyse these practices, in order to outline an account of model-based theorising that involves direct representational relationships. This is based on the (...)
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  49. Hypnotic Suggestion and Cognitive Neuroscience.David A. Oakley & Peter W. Halligan - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (6):264-270.
  50. Specifying the Self for Cognitive Neuroscience.Kalina Christoff, Diego Cosmelli, Dorothée Legrand & Evan Thompson - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (3):104-112.
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