11 found
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  1.  39
    The Morality of Harm.Paulo Sousa, Colin Holbrook & Jared Piazza - 2009 - Cognition 113 (1):80-92.
  2. Folk Concepts of Intentional Action in the Contexts of Amoral and Immoral Luck.Paulo Sousa & Colin Holbrook - 2010 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (3):351-370.
    This paper concerns a recently discovered, puzzling asymmetry in judgments of whether an action is intentional or not (Knobe, Philosophical Psychology 16:309–324, 2003a ; Analysis 63:190–193, b ). We report new data replicating the asymmetry in the context of scenarios wherein an agent achieves an amoral or immoral goal due to luck. Participants’ justifications of their judgments of the intentionality of the agent’s action indicate that two distinct folk concepts of intentional action played a role in their judgments. When viewed (...)
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  3.  20
    May God Guide Our Guns.Jeremy Pollack, Colin Holbrook, Daniel M. T. Fessler, Adam Maxwell Sparks & James G. Zerbe - 2018 - Human Nature 29 (3):311-327.
    The perceived support of supernatural agents has been historically, ethnographically, and theoretically linked with confidence in engaging in violent intergroup conflict. However, scant experimental investigations of such links have been reported to date, and the extant evidence derives largely from indirect laboratory methods of limited ecological validity. Here, we experimentally tested the hypothesis that perceived supernatural aid would heighten inclinations toward coalitional aggression using a realistic simulated coalitional combat paradigm: competitive team paintball. In a between-subjects design, US paintball players recruited (...)
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  4.  50
    Authority Dependence and Judgments of Utilitarian Harm.Jared Piazza, Paulo Sousa & Colin Holbrook - 2013 - Cognition 128 (3):261-270.
    Three studies tested the conditions under which people judge utilitarian harm to be authority dependent (i.e., whether its right or wrongness depends on the ruling of an authority). In Study 1, participants judged the right or wrongness of physical abuse when used as an interrogation method anticipated to yield useful information for preventing future terrorist attacks. The ruling of the military authority towards the harm was manipulated (prohibited vs. prescribed) and found to significantly influence judgments of the right or wrongness (...)
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  5.  11
    Sizing Up the Threat: The Envisioned Physical Formidability of Terrorists Tracks Their Leaders' Failures and Successes.Colin Holbrook & Daniel Mt Fessler - 2013 - Cognition 127 (1):46-56.
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  6.  13
    With God on Our Side: Religious Primes Reduce the Envisioned Physical Formidability of a Menacing Adversary.Colin Holbrook, Daniel M. T. Fessler & Jeremy Pollack - 2016 - Cognition 146:387-392.
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  7.  22
    Moral Asymmetries in Judgments of Agency Withstand Ludicrous Causal Deviance.Paulo Sousa, Colin Holbrook & Lauren Swiney - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  8.  12
    Supernatural Beliefs, Unconscious Threat and Judgment Bias in Tibetan Buddhists.Colin Holbrook & Paulo Sousa - 2013 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 13 (1-2):33-56.
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  9.  6
    Men’s Physical Strength Moderates Conceptualizations of Prospective Foes in Two Disparate Societies.Daniel M. T. Fessler, Colin Holbrook & Matthew M. Gervais - 2014 - Human Nature 25 (3):393-409.
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  10.  16
    Baumard Et Al.'S Moral Markets Lack Market Dynamics.Daniel Mt Fessler & Colin Holbrook - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (1):89 - 90.
    Market models are indeed indispensable to understanding the evolution of cooperation and its emotional substrates. Unfortunately, Baumard et al. eschew market thinking in stressing the supposed invariance of moral/cooperative behavior across circumstances. To the contrary, humans display contingent morality/cooperation, and these shifts are best accounted for by market models of partner choice for mutually beneficial collaboration.
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  11.  6
    Revenge Without Redundancy: Functional Outcomes Do Not Require Discrete Adaptations for Vengeance or Forgiveness.Colin Holbrook, Daniel Mt Fessler & Matthew M. Gervais - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (1):22-23.
    We question whether the postulated revenge and forgiveness systems constitute true adaptations. Revenge and forgiveness are the products of multiple motivational systems and capacities, many of which did not exclusively evolve to support deterrence. Anger is more aptly construed as an adaptation that organizes independent mechanisms to deter transgressors than as the mediator of a distinct revenge adaptation.
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