14 found
Order:
See also
Colin Johnston
University of Stirling
  1. Judgment and the Identity Theory of Truth.Colin Johnston - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 166 (2):381-397.
    The identity theory of truth takes on different forms depending on whether it is combined with a dual relation or a multiple relation theory of judgment. This paper argues that there are two significant problems for the dual relation identity theorist regarding thought’s answerability to reality, neither of which takes a grip on the multiple relation identity theory.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  2. Judgements, Facts and Propositions: Theories of Truth in Russell, Wittgenstein and Ramsey.Colin Johnston & Peter Sullivan - 2018 - In Michael Glanzberg (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Truth. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. pp. 150-192.
    In 'On the nature of truth and falsehood' Russell offers both a multiple relation theory of judgment and a correspondence theory of truth. It has been a prevailing understanding of the Tractatus that Wittgenstein rejects Russell’s multiple relation idea but endorses the correspondence theory. Ramsey took the opposite view. In his 'Facts and Propositions', Ramsey endorses Russell’s multiple relation idea, rejects the correspondence theory, and then asserts that these moves are both due to Wittgenstein. This chapter will argue that Ramsey’s (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3.  82
    The Unity of a Tractarian Fact.Colin Johnston - 2007 - Synthese 156 (2):231-251.
    It is not immediately clear from Wittgenstein’s Tractatus how to connect his idea there of an object with the logical ontologies of Frege and Russell. Toward clarification on this matter, this paper compares Russell’s and Wittgenstein’s versions of the thesis of an atomic fact that it is a complex composition. The claim arrived at is that whilst Russell (at times at least) has one particular of the elements of a fact – the relation – responsible for the unity of the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  4. Conflicting Rules and Paradox.Colin Johnston - 2014 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88 (2):410-433.
    First paragraph: This paper seeks to understand various paradoxes as cases of conflicting rules. In particular, the ambition is to outline a new perspective on and response to the Liar -- though it will take us a while to get that far. We begin in Section 1 with an account of simple rule confliction. Section 2 then brings this account to bear on a paradox, the Secretary Liberation Paradox, which is readily seen to involve conflicting rules. Finally in Section 3 (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  91
    Symbols in Wittgenstein's Tractatus.Colin Johnston - 2007 - European Journal of Philosophy 15 (3):367-394.
    This paper is concerned with the status of a symbol in Wittgenstein’s Tractatus. It is claimed in the first section that a Tractarian symbol, whilst essentially a syntactic entity to be distinguished from the mark or sound that is its sign, bears its semantic significance only inessentially. In the second and third sections I pursue this point of exegesis through the Tractarian discussions of nonsense and the context principle respectively. The final section of the paper places the forgoing work in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  6.  84
    Russell, Wittgenstein, and Synthesis in Thought.Colin Johnston - 2012 - In Jose L. Zalabardo (ed.), Wittgenstein's Early Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 15.
    Wittgenstein held that Russell’s multiple relation theory of judgment fails to explain an atomic judgment’s representation of entities as combined. He demonstrated this failure as follows. Under the multiple relation theory, an atomic judgment is a complex whose relating relation is judgment, the universal, and whose terms include the entities the judgment represents as combined. Taking such a complex we may arrive through the substitution of constituents at a complex whose relating relation is again judgment but whose terms do not (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  7.  88
    Tractarian Objects and Logical Categories.Colin Johnston - 2009 - Synthese 167 (1):145 - 161.
    It has been much debated whether Tractarian objects are what Russell would have called particulars or whether they include also properties and relations. This paper claims that the debate is misguided: there is no logical category such that Wittgenstein intended the reader of the Tractatus to understand his objects either as providing examples of or as not providing examples of that category. This is not to say that Wittgenstein set himself against the very idea of a logical category: quite the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8.  57
    Assertion, Saying, and Propositional Complexity in Wittgenstein's Tractatus.Colin Johnston - 2011 - In Marie McGinn & Oskari Kuusela (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Wittgenstein. Oxford University Press.
    Wittgenstein responds in his Notes on Logic to a discussion of Russell's Principles of Mathematics concerning assertion. Russell writes: "It is plain that, if I may be allowed to use the word assertion in a non-psychological sense, the proposition "p implies q" asserts an implication, though it does not assert p or q. The p and the q which enter into this proposition are not strictly the same as the p or the q which are separate propositions." (PoM p35) Wittgenstein (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  6
    Zalabardo on Semantic Unity and Metaphysical Unity.Colin Johnston - 2018 - Australasian Philosophical Review 2 (3):321-326.
    ABSTRACTZalabardo argues that the Tractatus makes an important contribution towards explaining how a representation doesn¹t merely introduce various objects, but furthermore represents them as comb...
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  28
    Frege on Syntax, Ontology, and Truth's Pride of Place.Colin Johnston - 2018 - European Journal of Philosophy 26 (1):569-588.
    Frege's strict alignment between his syntactic and ontological categories is not, as is commonly assumed, some kind of a philosophical thesis. There is no thesis that proper names refer only to objects, say, or that what refers to an object is a proper name. Rather, the alignment of categories is internal to Frege's conception of what syntax and ontology are. To understand this, we need to recognise the pride of place Frege assigns within his theorising to the notion of truth. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  29
    The Determination of Form by Syntactic Employment: A Model and a Difficulty.Colin Johnston - 2008 - Contributions of the Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society 16:156-158.
    This paper develops a model for understanding the Tractarian doctrine that a sign insyntactic use determines a form. This doctrine is found to be in tension withWittgenstein's agnosticism with regard to forms of reality.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  27
    Objectivity and the Parochial. By Charles Travis. (Oxford UP, 2011. Pp. 361. Price £45.00.). [REVIEW]Colin Johnston - 2012 - Philosophical Quarterly 62 (247):418-420.
    Objectivity and the Parochial, Charles Travis, Oxford: OUP, 2011, 361pp. ISBN 9780199596218.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  26
    Review of Rupert Read, Laura Cook (Ed.), Applying Wittgenstein[REVIEW]Colin Johnston - 2008 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (7).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Wittgenstein on Representability and Possibility.Colin Johnston - 2017 - In Christopher Pincock & Sandra Lapointe (eds.), Innovations in the History of Analytical Philosophy. pp. 127-147.
    It is a central commitment of the Tractatus that “it is impossible to judge a nonsense” (§5.5422). This essay seeks to understand the ground of this commitment in Wittgenstein’s thought. To this end, various interpretations of the Tractatus on ‘the relation between language and reality’ are considered, with each position assessed for the understanding it provides of the stance against nonsense. Having rejected as inadequate various realist readings, and then also an idealist reading, the essay recommends a view on which (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark