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Colin J. Lewis [6]Colin Lewis [3]Colin Joseph Lewis [1]
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Colin Lewis
University of Colorado, Colorado Springs
  1.  66
    Ritual Education and Moral Development: A Comparison of Xunzi and Vygotsky.Colin Lewis - 2018 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 17 (1):81-98.
    Xunzi’s 荀子 advocacy for moral education is well-documented; precisely how his program bolsters moral development, and why a program touting study of ritual could be effective, remain subjects of debate. I argue that these matters can be clarified by appealing to the theory of learning and development offered by Lev Vygotsky. Vygotsky posited that development depends primarily on social interactions mediated by sociocultural tools that modify learners’ cognitive architecture, enabling increasingly sophisticated thought. Vygotsky’s theory is remarkably similar to Xunzi’s account (...)
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  2.  9
    Social and Political “Statutes of Limitations”: Mo' Approaches, Mo' Problems.Jennifer Kling & Colin J. Lewis - 2022 - In Court D. Lewis (ed.), Forgiveness Confronts Race, Relationships, and the Social. Wilmington, DE, USA: pp. 91-111.
    Recent events have directed public attention to the issue of whether there should be so-called “statutes of limitations” on oppressive transgressions committed in the past. We ask: in such cases, is sociopolitical forgiveness (or “forgetfulness”) owed to transgressors? We detail two moral-political narratives that might help address this issue: one constructed around the values and perspectives of justice, rights, and autonomy-based views (the JRA approach), and another oriented around the values and perspectives of care ethics, virtue ethics, and relationality, drawing (...)
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  3. Moral Anger in Classical Confucianism.Colin Lewis - 2020 - In Court Lewis & Gregory L. Bock (eds.), The Ethics of Anger. Lexington Books. pp. 131-154.
    Philosophical discussions of the moralization of anger have not, to date, substantively engaged classical Chinese thought. This is unfortunate, given the abundance of appeals to moral anger in the classical literature, especially among the Confucians, and the suppression, expression, and functionalization of anger. Accordingly, this essay engages in two general projects: one interpretive, one applied. The interpretive project examines the manner in which classical Confucian thought regards anger as having both destructive and constructive aspects, how these aspects are unavoidable human (...)
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  4.  53
    Getting Clarity by Defining Artificial Intelligence—A Survey.Colin Lewis & Dagmar Monett - 2017 - In Vincent C. Müller (ed.), Philosophy and Theory of Artificial Intelligence 2017. Springer.
    Intelligence remains ill-defined. Theories of intelligence and the goal of Artificial Intelligence have been the source of much confusion both within the field and among the general public. Studies that contribute to a well-defined goal of the discipline and spread a stronger, more coherent message, to the mainstream media, policy-makers, investors, and the general public to help dispel myths about A.I. are needed. We present the preliminary results of our research survey “Defining Intelligence.” Opinions, from a cross sector of professionals, (...)
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  5.  35
    Yu in the Xunzi: Toward a Precise Understanding.Colin J. Lewis - 2018 - Asian Philosophy 28 (2):157-169.
    An ongoing dialogue in Xunzi scholarship addresses the role of yu (欲), often rendered as ‘desire,’ in motivation, but little has been said about what yu actually is, or whether the translation of ‘desire’ accurately reflects Xunzi’s use of the term. Employing textual analysis alongside research in cognitive science, most notably work on the so-called ‘wanting-liking’ distinction, I work toward a more precise understanding of Xunzi’s notion of yu and its functions. I suggest that yu be construed as a kind (...)
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  6.  35
    Vygotsky and Moral Education: A Response to and Expansion of Tappan.Colin J. Lewis - 2019 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (1):41-50.
    Despite increasing studies and applications of Vygotsky’s theory of learning and development, little has been written connecting Vygotsky specifically to moral education. The most comprehensive attempt at formulating such an account is given by Mark Tappan. I critically evaluate Tappan’s account before raising several problems for his approach. I then offer suggestions for resolving these issues by turning to research in socialization theory and recommending additional sociocultural artifacts that can supplement moral education.
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  7. Justified Revolution in Contemporary American Democracy: A Confucian-Inspired Account.Jennifer Kling & Colin J. Lewis - 2022 - In LeLand Harper (ed.), The Crisis of American Democracy: Essays on a Failing Institution. New York, NY, USA: pp. 167-192.
    How much injustice and oppression must be tolerated before a revolution is justified? In theory, the United States’ political structure, by design, makes the question of revolution obsolete: by putting political power into the hands of the people via democratic mechanisms such as voting, the division of power among separate branches of government, and representative influence and control, there should be no need for revolution because everything the government does either has the consent of the people or is (relatively swiftly) (...)
     
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  8.  3
    Confucian Ritual and Moral Education.Colin J. Lewis - 2020 - Lexington Books.
    The ancient Confucians developed a particular notion of ritual and placed it at the center of their moral cultivation program. This book examines the Confucian ritual method through the lens of modern developmental theory and creates a theoretical framework for deploying ritual as an invaluable tool in contemporary moral education pursuits.
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