Results for 'Collaboration'

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  1. Power, Bargaining, and Collaboration.Justin Bruner & Cailin O'Connor - 2016 - In T. Boyer, C. Mayo-Wilson & M. Weisberg (eds.), Scientific Collaboration and Collective Knowledge.
    Collaboration is increasingly popular across academia. Collaborative work raises certain ethical questions, however. How will the fruits of collaboration be divided? How will the work for the collaborative project be split? In this paper, we consider the following question in particular. Are there ways in which these divisions systematically disadvantage certain groups? -/- We use evolutionary game theoretic models to address this question. First, we discuss results from O'Connor and Bruner (unpublished). In this paper, we show that underrepresented (...)
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  2. Skill and Collaboration in the Evolution of Human Cognition.John Sutton - 2013 - Biological Theory 8 (1):28-36.
    I start with a brief assessment of the implications of Sterelny’s anti-individualist, anti-internalist apprentice learning model for a more historical and interdisciplinary cognitive science. In a selective response I then focus on two core features of his constructive account: collaboration and skill. While affirming the centrality of joint action and decision making, I raise some concerns about the fragility of the conditions under which collaborative cognition brings benefits. I then assess Sterelny’s view of skill acquisition and performance, which runs (...)
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  3.  95
    A Virtue-Ethics Analysis of Supply Chain Collaboration.Matthew J. Drake & John Teepen Schlachter - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (4):851-864.
    Technological advancements in information systems over the past few decades have enabled firms to work with the major suppliers and customers in their supply chain in order to improve the performance of the entire channel. Tremendous benefits for all parties can be realized by sharing information and coordinating operations to reduce inventory requirements, improve quality, and increase customer satisfaction; but the companies must collaborate effectively to bring these gains to fruition. We consider two alternative methods of managing these interfirm supply (...)
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  4. Scientific Collaboration: Do Two Heads Need to Be More Than Twice Better Than One?Thomas Boyer-Kassem & Cyrille Imbert - 2015 - Philosophy of Science 82 (4):667-688.
    Epistemic accounts of scientific collaboration usually assume that, one way or another, two heads really are more than twice better than one. We show that this hypothesis is unduly strong. We present a deliberately crude model with unfavorable hypotheses. We show that, even then, when the priority rule is applied, large differences in successfulness can emerge from small differences in efficiency, with sometimes increasing marginal returns. We emphasize that success is sensitive to the structure of competing communities. Our results (...)
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  5.  21
    Different Paths to Collaboration Between Businesses and Civil Society and the Role of Third Parties.Daniel Arenas, Pablo Sanchez & Matthew Murphy - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (4):723-739.
    In this article, we suggest that one of the unexplored paths toward collaboration between firms and civil society organizations starts with confrontation or potential conflict, and that the transition toward collaboration can be further understood if one focuses on triadic relationships rather than dyadic ones. We analyze the presence of third parties and their different roles to explain how collaboration is facilitated. The article aims at bringing together the bodies of research on business–civil society confrontation and on (...)
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  6.  60
    Moral Trust & Scientific Collaboration.Karen Frost-Arnold - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (3):301-310.
    Modern scientific knowledge is increasingly collaborative. Much analysis in social epistemology models scientists as self-interested agents motivated by external inducements and sanctions. However, less research exists on the epistemic import of scientists’ moral concern for their colleagues. I argue that scientists’ trust in their colleagues’ moral motivations is a key component of the rationality of collaboration. On the prevailing account, trust is a matter of mere reliance on the self-interest of one’s colleagues. That is, scientists merely rely on external (...)
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  7.  20
    Creating Time: Social Collaboration in Music Improvisation.Ashley E. Walton, Auriel Washburn, Peter Langland‐Hassan, Anthony Chemero, Heidi Kloos & Michael J. Richardson - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 10 (1):95-119.
    Musical collaboration emerges from the complex interaction of environmental and informational constraints, including those of the instruments and the performance context. Music improvisation in particular is more like everyday interaction in that dynamics emerge spontaneously without a rehearsed score or script. We examined how the structure of the musical context affords and shapes interactions between improvising musicians. Six pairs of professional piano players improvised with two different backing tracks while we recorded both the music produced and the movements of (...)
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  8. Introduction to the Special Section: Interdisciplinary Collaboration Multi-Level Perspectives on Interdisciplinary Cognition and Team Collaboration: Challenges and Opportunities.Machiel Keestra - 2017 - Issues in Interdisciplinary Studies 35:113-120.
    What can insights from psychological science contribute to interdisciplinary research, conducted by individuals or by interdisciplinary teams? Three articles shed light on this by focusing on the micro- (personal), meso- (inter-personal), and macro- (team) level. This Introduction (and Table of Contents) to the 'Special Section on Interdisciplinary Collaborations' offers a brief description of the conference session that was the point of departure for two of the three articles. Frank Kessel and Machiel Keestra organized a panel session for the March 2015 (...)
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  9. Embodied Collaboration in Small Groups.Kellie Williamson & John Sutton - 2014 - In C. T. Wolfe (ed.), Brain Theory: Essays in Critical Neurophilosophy. Springer. pp. 107-133.
    Being social creatures in a complex world, we do things together. We act jointly. While cooperation, in its broadest sense, can involve merely getting out of each other’s way, or refusing to deceive other people, it is also essential to human nature that it involves more active forms of collaboration and coordination (Tomasello 2009; Sterelny 2012). We collaborate with others in many ordinary activities which, though at times similar to those of other animals, take unique and diverse cultural and (...)
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  10.  12
    Nanoethics—A Collaboration Across Disciplines.Anna Julie Rasmussen, Mette Ebbesen & Svend Andersen - 2012 - NanoEthics 6 (3):185-193.
    The field of nanoscience and nanotechnology is expanding rapidly, promising great benefits for society in the form of better medicine, more efficient energy production, new types of materials, etc. Naturally, in order for the science and technology to live up to these promises, it is important to continue scientific research and development, but equally important is the ethical dimension. Giving attention to the social, ethical and legal aspects of the field, among others, will help in developing a fully responsible—and thereby (...)
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  11.  5
    Scientific Collaboration and Collective Knowledge.Thomas Boyer-Kassem, Conor Mayo-Wilson & Michael Weisberg (eds.) - 2017 - New York, USA: Oxford University Press.
    Current scientific research almost always requires collaboration among several (if not several hundred) specialized researchers. When scientists co-author a journal article, who deserves credit for discoveries or blame for errors? How should scientific institutions promote fruitful collaborations among scientists? In this book, leading philosophers of science address these critical questions.
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  12.  44
    The Collaboration Between Anatomists and Mathematicians in the Mid-Seventeenth Century with a Study of Images as Experiments and Galileo's Role in Steno's Myology.Domenico Bertoloni Meli - 2008 - Early Science and Medicine 13 (6):665-709.
    Moving from Paris, Pisa, and Oxford to London, Amsterdam, and Cambridge, this essay documents extensive collaborations between anatomists and mathematicians. At a time when no standard way to acknowledge collaboration existed, it is remarkable that in all the cases I discuss anatomists expressed in print their debt to mathematicians. The cases I analyze document an extraordinarily fertile period in the history of anatomy and science and call into question historiographic divisions among historians of science and medicine. I focus on (...)
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  13.  29
    The WALL: Participatory Design Workspace in Support of Creativity, Collaboration, and Socialization. [REVIEW]Renate Fruchter & Petra Bosch-Sijtsema - 2011 - AI and Society 26 (3):221-232.
    A key challenge faced by organizations is to provide project teams with workspaces, information, and collaboration technologies that fosters creativity and high-performance team productivity. This requires understanding the relation between and impacts of (1) workspace, (2) activity and content that is created, and (3) social, behavioral, and cognitive aspects of work. This paper describes an exploratory study of everyday activities in the context of knowledge work in a shared workspace used by a high-tech global design team that explores future (...)
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  14.  22
    Dance, Music and Dramaturgy: Collaboration Plan and Dramaturgical Apparatus.João Paulo Lucas & César Lignelli - 2017 - Revista Brasileira de Estudos de Presença 7 (1):19-44.
    Dance, Music and Dramaturgy: collaboration plan and dramaturgical apparatus – The unfolding of the concept of dramaturgy and the problematics of contemporary choreography are, today, a vast and diverse field of research, bearing numerous disclosures that lead to their reciprocal implication. Apart from that, dance and music share significant complementary ties allowing for the consideration of a common compositional inquiry. Reflecting on the compositional processes of dance and music, this article cross-examines the collaboration between choreographers and composers, integrating (...)
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  15.  34
    Innovation Systems in Malaysia: A Perspective of University—Industry R&D Collaboration[REVIEW]V. G. R. Chandran, Veera Pandiyan Kaliani Sundram & Sinnappan Santhidran - 2014 - AI and Society 29 (3):435-444.
    Collaborative research and development (R&D) activities between public universities and industry are of importance for the sustainable development of the innovation ecosystem. However, policymakers especially in developing countries show little knowledge on the issues. In this paper, we analyse the level of university–industry collaboration in Malaysia. We further examine the fundamental conditions that hinder university–industry collaboration despite the government’s initiatives to improve such linkages. We show that the low collaboration is a result of an R&D gap between (...)
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  16.  22
    Core/Periphery Scientific Collaboration Networks Among Very Similar Researchers.Antoni Rubí-Barceló - 2012 - Theory and Decision 72 (4):463-483.
    Empirical studies such as Goyal et al. (J Polit Econ 114(2):403–412, 2006) or Newman (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 101(Suppl. 1):5200–5205, 2004) show that scientific collaboration networks present a highly unequal and hierarchical distribution of links. This implies that some researchers can be much more active and productive than others and, consequently, they can enjoy a much better scientific reputation. One may think that big intrinsical differences among researchers can constitute the main driving force behind these inequalities. Nevertheless, this (...)
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  17.  21
    Validating Teacher Performativity Through Lifelong School-University Collaboration.Theodore Lewis - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (10):1028-1039.
    The main point of this article is that more credence should be given in teacher education to performative dimensions of teaching. I agree with David Carr that the requisite capabilities are probably best learned in actual schools. I employ Turnbull’s conception of performativity, which speaks of tacit cultural learning. Following Wilfred Carr I go back to Aristotle, and to debate between Gadamer and Habermas, before arriving at the view that expert teaching practice should be in the spirit of phronesis. The (...)
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  18.  20
    Ethics as Functional Collaboration.James Duffy - 2012 - Journal of Macrodynamic Analysis 7:123-150.
    “What are we to do next?” is a question that spontaneously emerges in our daily lives, for example, in planning a family vacation, and the question is permeated by a mood of adventure. Ethics as functional collaboration envisions an adventure-anticipating team of individuals who are reaching for better vacations for one and all. Collectively the team is to reach both for a serious understanding of the concrete and particular, be it the local high school or local economy, and for (...)
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  19.  19
    The Ontogeny and Evolution of Human Collaboration.Brian McLoone & Rory Smead - 2014 - Biology and Philosophy 29 (4):559-576.
    How is the human tendency and ability to collaborate acquired and how did it evolve? This paper explores the ontogeny and evolution of human collaboration using a combination of theoretical and empirical resources. We present a game theoretic model of the evolution of learning in the Stag Hunt game, which predicts the evolution of a built-in cooperative bias. We then survey recent empirical results on the ontogeny of collaboration in humans, which suggest the ability to collaborate is developmentally (...)
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  20.  23
    Cognitive and Social Structure of the Elite Collaboration Network of Astrophysics: A Case Study on Shifting Network Structures. [REVIEW]Richard Heidler - 2011 - Minerva 49 (4):461-488.
    Scientific collaboration can only be understood along the epistemic and cognitive grounding of scientific disciplines. New scientific discoveries in astrophysics led to a major restructuring of the elite network of astrophysics. To study the interplay of the epistemic grounding and the social network structure of a discipline, a mixed-methods approach is necessary. It combines scientometrics, quantitative network analysis and visualization tools with a qualitative network analysis approach. The centre of the international collaboration network of astrophysics is demarcated by (...)
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  21.  12
    How Do Groups Work? Age Differences in Performance and the Social Outcomes of Peer Collaboration.Patrick J. Leman - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (4):804-820.
    Do children derive different benefits from group collaboration at different ages? In the present study, 183 children from two age groups took part in a class quiz as members of a group, or individually. In some groups, cohesiveness was made salient by awarding prizes to the top performing groups. In other groups, prizes were awarded to the best performing individuals. Findings, both in terms of social outcomes and performance in the quiz, indicated that the 8-year olds viewed the benefits (...)
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  22.  5
    Information Exchange in Business Collaboration Using Grid Technologies.Fotis Aisopos, Konstantinos Tserpes, Magdalini Kardara, George Panousopoulos, Stephen Phillips & Spyridon Salamouras - 2009 - Identity in the Information Society 2 (2):189-204.
    With the emergence of service provisioning environments and new networking capabilities, antagonistic businesses have been able to collaborate securely by sharing information in order to have a beneficial result for all. This collaboration has sometimes been imposed by state legislation and sometimes been desirable by the firms themselves so as to resolve frequently occurring abnormalities. In any case, as information exchange takes place between antagonistic firms, security and privacy issues arise. In the context of this paper, a collaborative environment (...)
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  23.  52
    Collaboration, Interdisciplinarity, and the Epistemology of Contemporary Science.Hanne Andersen - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 56:1-10.
    Over the last decades, science has grown increasingly collaborative and interdisciplinary and has come to depart in important ways from the classical analyses of the development of science that were developed by historically inclined philosophers of science half a century ago. In this paper, I shall provide a new account of the structure and development of contemporary science based on analyses of, first, cognitive resources and their relations to domains, and second of the distribution of cognitive resources among collaborators and (...)
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  24.  24
    Philosophy of Digital Art as Collaboration.Andrew J. Corsa - 2019 - Hyperrhiz: New Media Cultures 19.
    How can artists create works of computer art or Internet art in which audience members become genuine artists and collaborate with the original artists on the self-same work that they began? To answer this question, this essay will reflect on the work of philosophers who focus on questions concerning art completion and the ontology of computer art. This essay will also reflect on the artistic work of the trio LaBeouf, Rönkkö & Turner, whose artwork can serve as a model for (...)
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  25.  7
    Problem‐Solving Phase Transitions During Team Collaboration.Travis J. Wiltshire, Jonathan E. Butner & Stephen M. Fiore - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (1):129-167.
    Multiple theories of problem-solving hypothesize that there are distinct qualitative phases exhibited during effective problem-solving. However, limited research has attempted to identify when transitions between phases occur. We integrate theory on collaborative problem-solving with dynamical systems theory suggesting that when a system is undergoing a phase transition it should exhibit a peak in entropy and that entropy levels should also relate to team performance. Communications from 40 teams that collaborated on a complex problem were coded for occurrence of problem-solving processes. (...)
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  26.  33
    The Experience of the Tacit in Multi- and Interdisciplinary Collaboration.David A. Stone - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):289-308.
    In exploring his concept of interactional expertise in the context of managers of big science projects, Collins identifies the development and deployment tacit knowledge as central, but acknowledges that sociologically, he cannot probe the concept further in developmental or pedagogical directions. In using the term tacit knowledge, Collins relies on the concept as articulated by Michael Polanyi. In coining the term, Polanyi acknowledges his reliance on Heidegger’s concept of being-in-the-world. This paper explores how Polanyi, and so Collins, fails to adequately (...)
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  27.  11
    Building Community Capacity Through Enhanced Collaboration in the Farmers Market Nutrition Program.Jamie S. Dollahite, Janet A. Nelson, Edward A. Frongillo & Matthew R. Griffin - 2005 - Agriculture and Human Values 22 (3):339-354.
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  28.  42
    Invitation to Functional Collaboration: Dynamics of Progress in the Sciences, Technologies, and Arts.Terry Quinn - 2012 - Journal of Macrodynamic Analysis 7:94-122.
    In all disciplines there is the question of how to promote progress and offset decline. But, what are progress and decline ? For this short article, the main discussion centers on biology. A solution called functional specialization begins to emerge as relevant to all of the sciences, technologies and arts. This introductory article ends with some heuristics on various follow-up issues.
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  29.  15
    Effects of a Nationwide Programme: Interventions to Reduce Perceived Barriers to Collaboration and to Increase Structural One‐on‐One Contact.Jantien Heideman, Miranda Laurant, Peter Verhaak, Michel Wensing & Richard Grol - 2007 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (6):860-866.
  30.  14
    Ethical Considerations for a Better Collaboration Between Architects and Structural Engineers: Design of Buildings with Reinforced Concrete Frame Systems in Earthquake Zones. [REVIEW]Yonca Hurol - 2014 - Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (2):597-612.
    Architects design building structures, although structural design is the profession of structural engineers. Thus, it is better for architects and structural engineers to collaborate starting from the initial phases of the architectural design. However, this is not very common because of the contradictory design processes and value systems held within the two professions. This article provides a platform upon which architects and structural engineers can resolve the value conflicts between them by analysing phases of the structural design of reinforced concrete (...)
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  31.  10
    The Objective Assessment of International Collaboration Between Pathology Laboratories.R. E. Holliman, J. D. Johnson & O. Adjei - 2006 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (1):1-7.
  32.  9
    Consensus on Interprofessional Collaboration in Hospitals: Statistical Agreement of Ratings From Ethnographic Fieldwork and Measurement Scales.Chris Kenaszchuk, Lesley Gotlib Conn, Katie Dainty, Colleen McCarthy, Scott Reeves & Merrick Zwarenstein - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (1):93-99.
  33.  52
    Empirical Research in Medical Ethics: How Conceptual Accounts on Normative-Empirical Collaboration May Improve Research Practice.Sabine Salloch, Jan Schildmann & Jochen Vollmann - 2012 - BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):5.
    BackgroundThe methodology of medical ethics during the last few decades has shifted from a predominant use of normative-philosophical analyses to an increasing involvement of empirical methods. The articles which have been published in the course of this so-called 'empirical turn' can be divided into conceptual accounts of empirical-normative collaboration and studies which use socio-empirical methods to investigate ethically relevant issues in concrete social contexts.DiscussionA considered reference to normative research questions can be expected from good quality empirical research in medical (...)
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  34.  3
    Value Creation in Inter-Organizational Collaboration: An Empirical Study.Emmanuel Raufflet & Morgane Pennec - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (4):817-834.
    Over the last decade, businesses, policymakers, and researchers alike have advocated the need for value creation through inter-organizational collaboration. Researchers have widely argued that organizations that are engaged in collaborative processes create value. Because researchers have tended to focus on the identification of organizational motivations and on key success factors for collaboration, however, both the nature and processes of value creation in inter-organizational collaboration have yet to be examined. A recent theory by Austin and Seitanidi :726–758, 2012a; (...)
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  35.  87
    Values in Science: The Case of Scientific Collaboration.Kristina Rolin - 2015 - Philosophy of Science 82 (2):157-177.
    Much of the literature on values in science is limited in its perspective because it focuses on the role of values in individual scientists’ decision making, thereby ignoring the context of scientific collaboration. I examine the epistemic structure of scientific collaboration and argue that it gives rise to two arguments showing that moral and social values can legitimately play a role in scientists’ decision to accept something as scientific knowledge. In the case of scientific collaboration some moral (...)
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  36. Consensus Collaboration Enhances Group and Individual Recall Accuracy.Celia Harris, Amanda Barnier & John Sutton - 2012 - Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 65 (1):v.
    We often remember in groups, yet research on collaborative recall finds “collaborative inhibition”: Recalling with others has costs compared to recalling alone. In related paradigms, remembering with others introduces errors into recall. We compared costs and benefits of two collaboration procedures—turn taking and consensus. First, 135 individuals learned a word list and recalled it alone (Recall 1). Then, 45 participants in three-member groups took turns to recall, 45 participants in three-member groups reached a consensus, and 45 participants recalled alone (...)
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  37.  60
    Interacting to Remember at Multiple Timescales: Coordination, Collaboration, Cooperation and Culture in Joint Remembering.Lucas M. Bietti & John Sutton - 2015 - Interaction Studies 16 (3):419-450.
    Everyday joint remembering, from family remembering around the dinner table to team remembering in the operating theatre, relies on the successful interweaving of multiple cognitive, bodily, social and material resources, anchored in specific cultural ecosystems. Such systems for joint remembering in social interactions are composed of processes unfolding over multiple but complementary timescales, which we distinguish for analytic purposes so as better to study their interanimation in practice: (i) faster, lower-level coordination processes of behavioral matching and interactional synchrony occurring at (...)
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  38.  25
    Discrimination and Collaboration in Science.Hannah Rubin & Cailin O’Connor - 2018 - Philosophy of Science 85 (3):380-402.
    We use game theoretic models to take an in-depth look at the dynamics of discrimination and academic collaboration. We find that in collaboration networks, small minority groups may be more likely to end up being discriminated against while collaborating. We also find that discrimination can lead members of different social groups to mostly collaborate with in-group members, decreasing the effective diversity of the social network. Drawing on previous work, we discuss how decreases in the diversity of scientific collaborations (...)
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  39.  51
    The Epistemic Costs and Benefits of Collaboration.Don Fallis - 2005 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 44 (S1):197-208.
    In “How to Collaborate,” Paul Thagard tries to explain why there is so much collaboration in science, and so little collaboration in philosophy, by giving an epistemic cost-benefit analysis. In this paper, I argue that an adequate explanation requires a more fully developed epistemic value theory than Thagard utilizes. In addition, I offer an alternative to Thagard’s explanation of the lack of collaboration in philosophy. He appeals to its lack of a tradition of collaboration and to (...)
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  40.  8
    And That I See a Darkness: The Stardom of Kirsten Dunst in Collaboration with Sofia Coppola in Three Images.Anna Backman Rogers - 2019 - Film-Philosophy 23 (2):114-136.
    Sofia Coppola and Kirsten Dunst share a long-standing collaboration that has lasted from Dunst's adolescence onwards and into mature womanhood. As a former child star, Dunst has grown up in front o...
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  41.  29
    The Ethics of Interprofessional Collaboration.J. Engel & D. Prentice - 2013 - Nursing Ethics 20 (4):0969733012468466.
    Interprofessional collaboration has become accepted as an important component in today’s health care and has been guided by concerns with patient safety, quality health-care outcomes, and economics. It is widely accepted that interprofessional collaboration improves patient outcomes through enhanced communication among health-care providers and increased accessibility to services. Although there is a paucity of research that provides confirmatory evidence, interprofessional competencies continue to be incorporated into the curricula of health-care students. This article examines the ethics of interprofessional (...) and ethical issues that arise from the mainstream adoption of interprofessional competencies and the potential for moral distress in nursing. (shrink)
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  42.  11
    Model Coupling in Resource Economics: Conditions for Effective Interdisciplinary Collaboration.MacLeod Miles & Michiru Nagatsu - 2016 - Philosophy of Science 83 (3):412-433.
    In this article we argue for the importance of studying interdisciplinary collaborations by focusing on the role that good choice and design of model-building frameworks and strategies can play overcoming the inherent difficulties of collaborative research. We provide an empirical study of particular collaborations between economists and ecologists in resource economics. We discuss various features of how models are put together for interdisciplinary collaboration in these cases and show how the use of a coupled-model framework in this case to (...)
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  43.  7
    Does Cross-Sector Collaboration Lead to Higher Nonprofit Capacity?Michelle Shumate, Jiawei Sophia Fu & Katherine R. Cooper - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (2):385-399.
    Cross-sector social partnership case-based theory and research have long argued that nonprofits that engage in more integrative and enduring cross-sector partnerships should increase their organizational capacity. By increasing their capacity, nonprofits increase their ability to contribute to systemic change. The current research investigates this claim in a large-scale empirical research study. In particular, this study examines whether nonprofits that have a greater number of integrated cross-sector partnerships have greater capacities for financial management, strategic planning, external communication, board leadership, mission orientation, (...)
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  44.  3
    Maintenance of Cross-Sector Partnerships: The Role of Frames in Sustained Collaboration.Elizabeth J. Klitsie, Shahzad Ansari & Henk W. Volberda - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (2):401-423.
    We examine the framing mechanisms used to maintain a cross-sector partnership that was created to address a complex long-term social issue. We study the first 8 years of existence of an XSP that aims to create a market for recycled phosphorus, a nutrient that is critical to crop growth but whose natural reserves have dwindled significantly. Drawing on 27 interviews and over 3000 internal documents, we study the evolution of different frames used by diverse actors in an XSP. We demonstrate (...)
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  45.  59
    Interdisciplinary Collaboration in Philosophy.Andrew Higgins & Alexis Dyschkant - 2014 - Metaphilosophy 45 (3):372-398.
    Many philosophers would, in theory, agree that the methods and tools of philosophy ought to be supplemented by those of other academic disciplines. In practice, however, the sociological data suggest that most philosophers fail to engage or collaborate with other academics, and this article argues that this is problematic for philosophy as a discipline. In relation to the value of interdisciplinary collaboration, the article highlights how experimental philosophers can benefit the field, but only insofar as they draw from the (...)
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  46.  38
    Encouraging Research Collaboration Through Ethical and Fair Authorship: A Model Policy.Jason J. Washburn - 2008 - Ethics and Behavior 18 (1):44 – 58.
    Realizing a comprehensive approach to evidence-based practice in psychology requires the collaboration of academic researchers and practicing clinicians. Increased collaboration is likely to contribute to the growing trend of multi-investigator projects, multiple-authored publications, and the subsequent conflicts regarding authorship credit and order. Recommendations and guidance on determining authorship credit and order are available in the literature; however, few concrete tools are available to assist in determining authorship credit and order. A model policy on authorship is presented. The model (...)
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  47.  2
    Logic of Secrets in Collaboration Networks.Sara More & Pavel Naumov - 2011 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 162 (12):959-969.
    The article proposes Logic of Secrets in Collaboration Networks, a formal logical system for reasoning about a set of secrets established over a fixed configuration of communication channels. The system’s key feature, a multi-channel relation called independence, is a generalization of a two-channel relation known in the literature as nondeducibility. The main result is the completeness of the proposed system with respect to a semantics of secrets.
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  48.  28
    What Makes a Catholic Hospital “Catholic” in an Age of Religious-Secular Collaboration? The Case of the Saint Marys Hospital and the Mayo Clinic.Keith M. Swetz, Mary E. Crowley & T. Dean Maines - 2013 - HEC Forum 25 (2):95-107.
    Mayo Clinic is recognized as a worldwide leader in innovative, high-quality health care. However, the Catholic mission and ideals from which this organization was formed are not widely recognized or known. From partnership with the Sisters of St. Francis in 1883, through restructuring of the Sponsorship Agreement in 1986 and current advancements, this Catholic mission remains vital today at Saint Marys Hospital. This manuscript explores the evolution and growth of sponsorship at Mayo Clinic, defined as “a collaboration between the (...)
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  49.  10
    A National Collaboration Process: Finnish Engineering Education for the Benefit of People and Environment.A. Takala & K. Korhonen-Yrjänheikki - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (4):1557-1569.
    The key stakeholders of the Finnish engineering education collaborated during 2006–09 to reform the system of education, to face the challenges of the changing business environment and to create a national strategy for the Finnish engineering education. The work process was carried out using participatory work methods. Impacts of sustainable development (SD) on engineering education were analysed in one of the subprojects. In addition to participatory workshops, the core part of the work on SD consisted of a research with more (...)
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  50. Collaboration in Scientific Practice—-A Social Epistemology of Research Groups.Susann Wagenknecht - 2014 - Dissertation, Aarhus University
    This monograph investigates the collaborative creation of scientific knowledge in research groups. To do so, I combine philosophical analysis with a first-hand comparative case study of two research groups in experimental science. Qualitative data are gained through observation and interviews, and I combine empirical insights with existing approaches to knowledge creation in philosophy of science and social epistemology. -/- On the basis of my empirically-grounded analysis I make several conceptual contributions. I study scientific collaboration as the interaction of scientists (...)
     
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