Results for 'Competition'

1000+ found
Order:
See also
  1.  29
    Morality, Competition, and the Firm: The Market Failures Approach to Business Ethics.Joseph Heath (ed.) - 2014 - Oup Usa.
    In four new and nine previously published essays, Joseph Heath provides a compelling new framework for thinking about the moral obligations of economic actors. The "market failures" approach to business ethics that he develops provides the basis for a unified theory of business ethics, corporate law, economic regulation, and the welfare state.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   55 citations  
  2. Competition as Cooperation.C. Thi Nguyen - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (1):123-137.
    Games have a complex, and seemingly paradoxical structure: they are both competitive and cooperative, and the competitive element is required for the cooperative element to work out. They are mechanisms for transforming competition into cooperation. Several contemporary philosophers of sport have located the primary mechanism of conversion in the mental attitudes of the players. I argue that these views cannot capture the phenomenological complexity of game-play, nor the difficulty and moral complexity of achieving cooperation through game-play. In this paper, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  3.  38
    Competitive Learning: From Interactive Activation to Adaptive Resonance.Stephen Grossberg - 1987 - Cognitive Science 11 (1):23-63.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   238 citations  
  4.  35
    Competition, Redemption, and Hope.Scott Kretchmar - 2012 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 39 (1):101-116.
    Zero-sum aspects of sport have generated a number of ethical concerns and a similar number of defenses or apologetics. The trick has been to find a middle position that neither overly gentrifies sport nor inappropriately emphasizes the significance of winning and losing. One such position would have us focus on the process of trying to win over the fact of having one. It would also ameliorate any harms associated with defeat by pointing out that benefits like achievement, excellence, and moral (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  5.  30
    Virtual Competitions and the Gamer’s Dilemma.Karim Nader - 2020 - Ethics and Information Technology 22 (3):239-245.
    This paper expands Rami Ali’s dissolution of the gamer’s dilemma (Ethics Inf Technol 17:267-274, 2015). Morgan Luck’s gamer’s dilemma (Ethics Inf Technol 11(1):31-36, 2009) rests on our having diverging intuition when considering virtual murder and virtual child molestation in video games. Virtual murder is seemingly permissible, when virtual child molestation is not and there is no obvious morally relevant difference between the two. Ali argues that virtual murder and virtual child molestation are equally permissible/impermissible when considered under different modes of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  6. Competition Theory and Channeling Explanation.Christopher H. Eliot - 2011 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 3 (20130604):1-16.
    The complexity and heterogeneity of causes influencing ecology’s domain challenge its capacity to generate a general theory without exceptions, raising the question of whether ecology is capable, even in principle, of achieving the sort of theoretical success enjoyed by physics. Weber has argued that competition theory built around the Competitive Exclusion Principle (especially Tilman’s resource-competition model) offers an example of ecology identifying a law-like causal regularity. However, I suggest that as Weber presents it, the CEP is not yet (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  7. Reasons, Competition, and Latitude.Justin Snedegar - forthcoming - In Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaethics, Volume 16. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    The overall moral status of an option—whether it is required, permissible, forbidden, or something we really should do—is explained by competition between the contributory reasons bearing on that option and the alternatives. A familiar challenge for accounts of this competition is to explain the existence of latitude: there are usually multiple permissible options, rather than a single required option. One strategy is to appeal to distinctions between reasons that compete in different ways. Philosophers have introduced various kinds of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  8. Competition for Consciousness Among Visual Events: The Psychophysics of Reentrant Visual Processes.Vincent Di Lollo, James T. Enns & Ronald A. Rensink - 2000 - Journal Of Experimental Psychology-General 129 (4):481-507.
    Advances in neuroscience implicate reentrant signaling as the predominant form of communication between brain areas. This principle was used in a series of masking experiments that defy explanation by feed-forward theories. The masking occurs when a brief display of target plus mask is continued with the mask alone. Two masking processes were found: an early process affected by physical factors such as adapting luminance and a later process affected by attentional factors such as set size. This later process is called (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   67 citations  
  9.  4
    Capitalism: Competition, Conflict, Crises.Anwar Shaikh - 2016 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Orthodox economics operates within a hypothesized world of perfect competition in which perfect consumers and firms act to bring about supposedly optimal outcomes. The discrepancies between this model and the reality it claims to address are then attributed to particular imperfections in reality itself. Most heterodox economists seize on this fact and insist that the world is characterized by imperfect competition. But this only ties them to the notion of perfect competition, which remains as their point of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  10.  60
    Do Competitive Environments Lead to the Rise and Spread of Unethical Behavior? Parallels From Enron.Brian W. Kulik, Michael J. O’Fallon & Manjula S. Salimath - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (4):703 - 723.
    While top-down descriptors have received much attention in explaining corruption, we develop a grassroots model to describe structural factors that may influence the emergence and spread of an individual’s (un)ethical behavior within organizations. We begin with a discussion of the economics justification of the benefits of competition, a rationale used by firms to adopt structural aides such as the ‹stacking’ practice that was implemented at Enron. We discuss and develop an individual-level theory of planned behavior, then extend it to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  11.  52
    Mixed Competition and Mixed Messages.Pam R. Sailors - 2014 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 41 (1):65-77.
    A survey of the philosophy of sport literature reveals that arguments regarding the issue of sex segregation in athletics have been advanced from time to time, but there has been little sustained discussion, no consensus, and no change in existing practice. In this paper, an effort to advance the conversation, I begin with Jane English’s seminal 1978 article as a springboard and employ existing literature on the question of sex segregation in order to raise difficulties with English’s analysis and outline (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  12.  72
    The Perverse Effects of Competition on Scientists' Work and Relationships.Melissa S. Anderson, Emily A. Ronning, Raymond De Vries & Brian C. Martinson - 2007 - Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (4):437-461.
    Competition among scientists for funding, positions and prestige, among other things, is often seen as a salutary driving force in U.S. science. Its effects on scientists, their work and their relationships are seldom considered. Focus-group discussions with 51 mid- and early-career scientists, on which this study is based, reveal a dark side of competition in science. According to these scientists, competition contributes to strategic game-playing in science, a decline in free and open sharing of information and methods, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  13.  71
    Competition Theory, Evolution, and the Concept of an Ecological Niche.Thomas R. Alley - 1982 - Acta Biotheoretica 31 (3):165-179.
    This article examines some of the main tenets of competition theory in light of the theory of evolution and the concept of an ecological niche. The principle of competitive exclusion and the related assumption that communities exist at competitive equilibrium - fundamental parts of many competition theories and models - may be violated if non-equilibrium conditions exist in natural communities or are incorporated into competition models. Furthermore, these two basic tenets of competition theory are not compatible (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  14. Cue Competition Effects and Young Children's Causal and Counterfactual Inferences.Teresa McCormack, Stephen Andrew Butterfill, Christoph Hoerl & Patrick Burns - 2009 - Developmental Psychology 45 (6):1563-1575.
    The authors examined cue competition effects in young children using the blicket detector paradigm, in which objects are placed either singly or in pairs on a novel machine and children must judge which objects have the causal power to make the machine work. Cue competition effects were found in a 5- to 6-year-old group but not in a 4-year-old group. Equivalent levels of forward and backward blocking were found in the former group. Children's counterfactual judgments were subsequently examined (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  15.  10
    Do Competitive Environments Lead to the Rise and Spread of Unethical Behavior? Parallels From Enron.Brian W. Kulik, Michael J. O’Fallon & Manjula S. Salimath - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (4):703-723.
    While top-down descriptors have received much attention in explaining corruption, we develop a grassroots model to describe structural factors that may influence the emergence and spread of an individual's ethical behavior within organizations. We begin with a discussion of the economics justification of the benefits of competition, a rationale used by firms to adopt structural aides such as the 'stacking' practice that was implemented at Enron. We discuss and develop an individual-level theory of planned behavior, then extend it to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  16.  30
    Hypothesis Competition Beyond Mutual Exclusivity.Jonah N. Schupbach & David H. Glass - 2017 - Philosophy of Science 84 (5):810-824.
    Competition between scientific hypotheses is not always a matter of mutual exclusivity. Consistent hypotheses can compete to varying degrees either directly or indirectly via a body of evidence. We motivate and defend a particular account of hypothesis competition by showing how it captures these features. Computer simulations of Bayesian inference are used to highlight the limitations of adopting mutual exclusivity as a simplifying assumption to model scientific reasoning, particularly due to the exclusion of hypotheses that may be true. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  17.  9
    Resource Competition and Reproduction.Eckart Voland & R. I. M. Dunbar - 1995 - Human Nature 6 (1):33-49.
    A family reconstitution study of the Krummhörn population (Ostfriesland, Germany, 1720–1874) reveals that infant mortality and children’s probabilities of marrying or emigrating unmarried are affected by the number of living same-sexed sibs in farmers’ families but not in the families of landless laborers. We interpret these results in terms of a “local resource competition” model in which resource-holding families are obliged to manipulate the reproductive future of their offspring. In contrast, families that lack resources have no need to manipulate (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  18.  62
    The Competition Controversy in Community Ecology.Gregory Cooper - 1993 - Biology and Philosophy 8 (4):359-384.
    There is a long history of controversy in ecology over the role of competition in determining patterns of distribution and abundance, and over the significance of the mathematical modeling of competitive interactions. This paper examines the controversy. Three kinds of considerations have been involved at one time or another during the history of this debate. There has been dispute about the kinds of regularities ecologists can expect to find, about the significance of evolutionary considerations for ecological inquiry, and about (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  19. Competition and Connectionism.Brian MacWhinney - 1989 - In Brian MacWhinney & Elizabeth Bates (eds.), The Crosslinguistic Study of Sentence Processing. Cambridge University Press. pp. 442--457.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   77 citations  
  20.  50
    Competitive Processes in Cross‐Situational Word Learning.Daniel Yurovsky, Chen Yu & Linda B. Smith - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (5):891-921.
    Cross-situational word learning, like any statistical learning problem, involves tracking the regularities in the environment. However, the information that learners pick up from these regularities is dependent on their learning mechanism. This article investigates the role of one type of mechanism in statistical word learning: competition. Competitive mechanisms would allow learners to find the signal in noisy input and would help to explain the speed with which learners succeed in statistical learning tasks. Because cross-situational word learning provides information at (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  21. Peer Competition and Cooperation.Ivan Gonzalez-Cabrera - 2018 - In T. K. Shackelford & V. A. Weekes-Shackelford (eds.), Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Psychological Science. Basel:
    Peer competition and peer cooperation can be intuitively seen as opposing phenomena. However, depending on multiple factors, they might be complementary. In a population divided into groups, for instance, members of each group may cooperate with their peers in order to compete with neighboring groups. Alternatively, they may compete with their peers as a means of choosing the best cooperative partners and demonstrate that they are reliable cooperative partners. For instance, if subjects can choose with whom they wish to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  91
    Wage Competition and the Special-Obligations Challenge to More Open Borders.Arash Abizadeh, Manish Pandey & Sohrab Abizadeh - 2015 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 14 (3):255-269.
    According to the special-obligations challenge to the justice argument for more open borders, immigration restrictions to wealthier polities are justified because of special obligations owed to disadvantaged compatriots negatively impacted by the immigration of low-skilled foreign workers. We refute the special-obligations challenge by refuting its empirical premise and draw out the normative implications of the empirical evidence for border policies. We show that immigration to wealthier polities has negligible impact on domestic wages and that only previous cohorts of immigrants are (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  23.  93
    Digraph Competitions and Cooperative Games.René van Den Brink & Peter Borm - 2002 - Theory and Decision 53 (4):327-342.
    Digraph games are cooperative TU-games associated to domination structures which can be modeled by directed graphs. Examples come from sports competitions or from simple majority win digraphs corresponding to preference profiles in social choice theory. The Shapley value, core, marginal vectors and selectope vectors of digraph games are characterized in terms of so-called simple score vectors. A general characterization of the class of (almost positive) TU-games where each selectope vector is a marginal vector is provided in terms of game semi-circuits. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  24. The Competition Account of Achievement‐Value.Ian D. Dunkle - 2019 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 100 (4):1018-1046.
    A great achievement makes one’s life go better independently of its results, but what makes an achievement great? A simple answer is—its difficulty. I defend this view against recent, pressing objections by interpreting difficulty in terms of competitiveness. Difficulty is determined not by how hard the agent worked for the end but by how hard others would need to do in order to compete. Successfully reaching a goal is a valuable achievement because it is difficult, and it is difficult because (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25.  48
    Tax Competition and Global Background Justice.Peter Dietsch & Thomas Rixen - 2014 - Journal of Political Philosophy 22 (2):150-177.
  26.  51
    Competitive Bluffing: An Examination of a Common Practice and its Relationship with Performance.Rebecca M. Guidice, G. Stoney Alder & Steven E. Phelan - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (4):535-553.
    Bluffing, a common and consequential form of competitive behavior, has been comparably ignored in the management literature, even though misleading one's rivals is suggested to be an advantageous skill in a multifaceted and highly competitive environment. To address this deficiency and advance scholarship on competitive dynamics, our study investigates the moral reasoning behind competitive bluffing and, using a simulated market-entry game, examines the performance effects of bluffing. Findings suggest that decision makers' views on the ethicality of bluffing competitors differ from (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  27.  25
    Lexical Competition and the Acquisition of Novel Words.M. Gareth Gaskell & Nicolas Dumay - 2003 - Cognition 89 (2):105-132.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  28. Good Competition and Drug-Enhanced Performance.Robert L. Simon - 1984 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 11 (1):6-13.
  29.  6
    A Competitive Swarm Optimizer-Based Technoeconomic Optimization with Appliance Scheduling in Domestic PV-Battery Hybrid Systems.Bo Wang, Yanjing Li, Fei Yang & Xiaohua Xia - 2019 - Complexity 2019:1-15.
    A technoeconomic optimization problem for a domestic grid-connected PV-battery hybrid energy system is investigated. It incorporates the appliance time scheduling with appliance-specific power dispatch. The optimization is aimed at minimizing energy cost, maximizing renewable energy penetration, and increasing user satisfaction over a finite horizon. Nonlinear objective functions and constraints, as well as discrete and continuous decision variables, are involved. To solve the proposed mixed-integer nonlinear programming problem at a large scale, a competitive swarm optimizer-based numerical solver is designed and employed. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  30.  7
    Competitive and Coordinative Interactions Between Body Parts Produce Adaptive Developmental Outcomes.Richard Gawne, Kenneth Z. McKenna & Michael Levin - 2020 - Bioessays 42 (8):1900245.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31.  41
    Competitive Irrationality in Transitional Economies: Are Communist Managers Less Irrational?Lance E. Brouthers, Dana-Nicoleta Lascu & Steve Werner - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (3):397-408.
    Why do marketing managers in the transitional economies of Eastern Europe and China often engage in competitively irrational behavior, choosing pricing strategies that damage competitors’ profits, rather than choosing pricing strategies that improve their firm’s profits? We propose one possible reason, the moral vacuum created by the collapse of communist ideology. We hypothesize and find that managers who experienced formal communist moral ideological indoctrination are less likely to be competitively irrational than the post-communist managers who did not. Implications are discussed.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32.  22
    Global Competition and Corporate Responsibilities of Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises.Georges Enderle - 2004 - Business Ethics: A European Review 13 (1):50-63.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  33. Competitive Recovery–Stress and Mood States in Mexican Youth Athletes.Luis Felipe Reynoso-Sánchez, Germán Pérez-Verduzco, Miguel Ángel Celestino-Sánchez, Jeanette M. López-Walle, Jorge Zamarripa, Blanca Rocío Rangel-Colmenero, Hussein Muñoz-Helú & Germán Hernández-Cruz - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    BackgroundMonitoring recovery–stress balance in sport is becoming more relevant to prevent training maladaptation and reach the optimal performance for each athlete. The use of questionnaires that identify the athlete’s recovery–stress state have much acceptance in sports due to reliability and useful, furthermore for its low cost. Identifying possible differences between sport modalities and sex is important to determine specific needs and possible intervention ways to keep a recovery–stress balance. The aim was to analyze the differences in the recovery–stress state and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34.  23
    Unsustainable Growth, Hyper-Competition, and Worth in Life Science Research: Narrowing Evaluative Repertoires in Doctoral and Postdoctoral Scientists’ Work and Lives.Maximilian Fochler, Ulrike Felt & Ruth Müller - 2016 - Minerva 54 (2):175-200.
    There is a crisis of valuation practices in the current academic life sciences, triggered by unsustainable growth and “hyper-competition.” Quantitative metrics in evaluating researchers are seen as replacing deeper considerations of the quality and novelty of work, as well as substantive care for the societal implications of research. Junior researchers are frequently mentioned as those most strongly affected by these dynamics. However, their own perceptions of these issues are much less frequently considered. This paper aims at contributing to a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  35.  21
    Vicious Competitiveness and the Desire to Win.Eric Gilbertson - 2016 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 43 (3):409-423.
    This paper discusses the nature of competitiveness and argues that being competitive does not essentially involve a strong desire to win or to outperform others. The appeal of the ‘desire-to-win’ analysis of competitiveness can be explained away provided we distinguish between virtuous and vicious competitiveness. It is conceivable that a virtuously competitive athlete lack a strong desire to win or to outperform others. Moreover, there is empirical evidence that virtuous competitiveness and vicious competitiveness are distinct character traits. If being virtuously (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  36.  33
    Competition, Cooperation, and an Adversarial Model of Sport.Sinclair A. MacRae - 2018 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 45 (1):53-67.
    In this paper, I defend a general theory of competition and contrast it with a corresponding general theory of cooperation. I then use this analysis to critique mutualism. Building on the work of Arthur Applbaum and Joseph Heath I develop an alternative adversarial model of competitive sport, one that helps explain and is partly justified by shallow interpretivism, and argue that this model helps shows that the claim that mutualism provides us with the most defensible ethical ideal of sport (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  37.  13
    Competition and Cooperation Among Similar Representations: Toward a Unified Account of Facilitative and Inhibitory Effects of Lexical Neighbors.Qi Chen & Daniel Mirman - 2012 - Psychological Review 119 (2):417-430.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  38.  24
    Competitive Irrationality: The Influence of Moral Philosophy.Dennis B. Arnett & Shelby D. Hunt - 2002 - Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (3):279-304.
    Abstract: This study explores a phenomenon that has been shown to adversely affect managers’ decisions—competitive irrationality. Managers are irrationally competitive in their decisions when they focus on damaging the profits of competitors, rather than improving their own profit performance. Studies by Armstrong and Collopy (1996) and Griffith and Rust (1997) suggest that the phenomenon is common but not universal. We examine the question of why some individuals exhibit competitive irrationality when making decisions, while others do not by focusing on four (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  39. Knowledge Management Processes and Their Role in Achieving Competitive Advantage at Al-Quds Open University.Nader H. Abusharekh, Husam R. Ahmad, Samer M. Arqawi, Samy S. Abu Naser & Mazen J. Al Shobaki - 2019 - International Journal of Academic Accounting, Finance and Management Research (IJAAFMR) 3 (9):24-41.
    The study aimed to identify the knowledge management processes and their role in achieving competitive advantage at Al-Quds Open University. The study was based on the descriptive analytical method, and the study population consists of academic and administrative staff in each of the branches of Al-Quds Open University in (Tulkarm, Nablus and Jenin). The researchers selected a sample of the study population by the intentional non-probability method, the size of (70) employees. A questionnaire was prepared and supervised by a number (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  40. Competition Over Agents with Boundedly Rational Expectations.Ran Spiegler - unknown
    I study a market model in which profit-maximizing firms compete in multidimensional pricing strategies over a consumer, who is limited in his ability to grasp such complicated objects and therefore uses a sampling procedure to evaluate them. Firms respond to increased competition with an increased effort to obfuscate, rather than with more competitive pricing. As a result, consumer welfare is not enhanced and may even deteriorate. Specifically, when firms control both the price and the quality of each dimension, and (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  41.  23
    Competition, Value Creation and the Self-Understanding of Business.David Silver - 2016 - Business Ethics Journal Review 4 (10):59-65.
    In defense of his Market Failures Approach to business ethics Joseph Heath relies on an understanding of business as essentially oriented towards competition and profit maximization. In these remarks I defend an alternative understanding of business that is centered on the creation of valuable goods and services. It is preferable because it: creates less pressure to take advantage of vulnerable stakeholders, can readily recognize “beyond compliance” norms that do not relate to efficiency, provides a more meaningful framework for people (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  42.  2
    Competition and its Tendency to Corrupt Philosophy.Yvette Drissen - 2022 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 1 (9):5–27.
    Competition plays a substantial and structural role in philosophy today. It is therefore remarkable that it has received little systematic ethical scrutiny in the literature until now. This paper aims to contribute to establishing a discussion about competition in the discipline of philosophy by arguing (i) that philosophy is not inherently competitive and (ii) that competition tends to corrupt the practice of philosophy. Regarding (i), I argue that philosophy can best be understood as a cooperative endeavour. The (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  47
    Competitiveness of East Asian Science Cities: Discourse on Their Status as Global or Local Innovative Clusters. [REVIEW]Sang-Chul Park - 2012 - AI and Society 27 (4):451-464.
    In a knowledge-based economy of the globalizing economic order, the role of regions is very significant in order to create and to disperse knowledge. Particularly, geographical clusters of firms in a single sub-national region may contribute to transmitting certain kinds of knowledge between and among firms. In addition, markets prefer to favor specialized firms with a coherent body of knowledge when knowledge creation and the use of new knowledge become increasingly important for maintaining and improving a firm’s competitiveness. Therefore, regional (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  22
    Killing the Competition.Martin Daly & Margo Wilson - 1990 - Human Nature 1 (1):81-107.
    Sex- and age-specific rates of killing unrelated persons of one’s own sex were computed for Canada (1974–1983), England/Wales (1977–1986), Chicago (1965–1981), and Detroit (1972) from census information and data archives of all homicides known to police. Patterns in relation to sex and age were virtually identical among the four samples, although the rates varied enormously (from 3.7 per million citizens per annum in England/Wales to 216.3 in Detroit). Men’s marital status was related to the probability of committing a same-sex, nonrelative (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  45.  2
    Communication, Competition, and Secrecy: The Production and Dissemination of Research-Related Information in Genetics.Katherine W. McCain - 1991 - Science, Technology and Human Values 16 (4):491-516.
    The dissemination of experimental materials, instruments, and methods is central to the progress of research in genetics. In recent years, competition for research funding and intellectual property issues have increasingly presented barriers to the dissemination of this "research-related information. "Information gathered in interviews with experimental geneticists and analysis of acknowledgment patterns in published genetics research are used to construct a series of basic scenarios for the exchange of genetic materials and research methods. The discussion focuses on factors affecting individuals' (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  46.  46
    Reconciling Corporate Citizenship and Competitive Strategy: Insights From Economic Theory.Sylvia Maxfield - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):367-377.
    Neoclassical and Austrian/evolutionary economic paradigms have different implications for integrating corporate social responsibility (corporate citizenship) and competitive strategy. porter's "Five Forces" model implicitly rests on neoclassical theory of the firm and is not easily reconciled with corporate social responsibility. Resource-based models of competitive strategy do not explicitly embrace a particular economic paradigm, but to the extent their conceptualization rests on neoclassical assumptions such as imperfect factor markets and profits as rents, these models also imply a trade-off between competitive advantage and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  47.  22
    Tax Competition and Global Interdependence.Mathias Risse & Marco Meyer - 2019 - Journal of Political Philosophy 27 (4):480-498.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  48.  18
    Tax Competition and Global Interdependence.Mathias Risse & Marco Meyer - 2019 - Journal of Political Philosophy 27 (4):480-498.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  49.  30
    Homer, Competition, and Sport.Daniel A. Dombrowski - 2012 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 39 (1):33-51.
    In this article I argue both that an understanding of sport?s general character as competitive play can help us to read Homer more insightfully and that this reading can boomerang back to us to further illuminate the sport as competitive play thesis. My overall method is that of (Rawlsian) reflective equilibrium. The three sections of Homer that I examine are the Phaiacian games in Book 8 of the ?Odyssey?, the Patroclos games in Book 23 of the ?Iliad?, and the Penelope (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  50.  55
    Competitive Sport, Winning and Education.Peter J. Arnold - 1989 - Journal of Moral Education 18 (1):15-25.
    Competition in education, school sport in particular, remains a controversial issue. The author recognizes that competition is a contested concept and examines both the 'strong' and 'weak' critiques against the moral desirability of having competitive sport as a part of the compulsory curriculum. The questions of selfishness and of winning are discussed, before the role of the teacher is examined. The author concludes that competitive sport is not per se a form of mis-education. It can be rather, if (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000