Results for 'Computational linguistics'

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  1.  5
    Archaeology Through Computational Linguistics: Inscription Statistics Predict Excavation Sites of Indus Valley Artifacts.Gabriel L. Recchia & Max M. Louwerse - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (8):2065-2080.
    Computational techniques comparing co-occurrences of city names in texts allow the relative longitudes and latitudes of cities to be estimated algorithmically. However, these techniques have not been applied to estimate the provenance of artifacts with unknown origins. Here, we estimate the geographic origin of artifacts from the Indus Valley Civilization, applying methods commonly used in cognitive science to the Indus script. We show that these methods can accurately predict the relative locations of archeological sites on the basis of artifacts (...)
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  2. Logical Aspects of Computational Linguistics Second International Conference, Lacl '97, Nancy, France, September 1997 : Selected Papers'. [REVIEW]Alain Lecomte & François Lamarche - 1999
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  3. Logical Aspects of Computational Linguistics Third International Conference, Lalc '98, Grenoble, France, December 14-16, 1998 : Selected Papers'. [REVIEW]Michael Moortgat - 2001
     
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  4.  44
    On the Importance of a Rich Embodiment in the Grounding of Concepts: Perspectives From Embodied Cognitive Science and Computational Linguistics.Serge Thill, Sebastian Padó & Tom Ziemke - 2014 - Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (3):545-558.
    The recent trend in cognitive robotics experiments on language learning, symbol grounding, and related issues necessarily entails a reduction of sensorimotor aspects from those provided by a human body to those that can be realized in machines, limiting robotic models of symbol grounding in this respect. Here, we argue that there is a need for modeling work in this domain to explicitly take into account the richer human embodiment even for concrete concepts that prima facie relate merely to simple actions, (...)
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  5.  21
    Current Approaches to Punctuation in Computational Linguistics.Bilge Say & Varol Akman - 1997 - Philosophical Explorations.
    Some recent studies in computational linguistics have aimed to take advantage of various cues presented by punctuation marks. This short survey is intended to summarise these research efforts and additionally, to outline a current perspective for the usage and functions of punctuation marks. We conclude by presenting an information-based framework for punctuation, influenced by treatments of several related phenomena in computational linguistics.
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  6.  2
    A Computational Linguistics Perspective on the Anticipatory Drive.G. Neumann - 2008 - Constructivist Foundations 4 (1):26-28.
    Open peer commentary on the target article “How and Why the Brain Lays the Foundations for a Conscious Self” by Martin V. Butz. Excerpt: In this commentary to Martin V. Butz’s target article I am especially concerned with his remarks about language (§33, §§71–79, §91) and modularity (§32, §41, §48, §81, §§94–98). In that context, I would like to bring into discussion my own work on computational models of self-monitoring (cf. Neumann 1998, 2004). In this work I explore the (...)
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  7.  4
    Review of "Collected Papers of Martin Kay: A Half-Century of Computational Linguistics". [REVIEW]Seán Ó Nualláin - 2015 - Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 11 (1):373-377.
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  8.  44
    Put My Galakmid Coin Into the Dispenser and Kick It: Computational Linguistics and Theorem Proving in a Computer Game. [REVIEW]Alexander Koller, Ralph Debusmann, Malte Gabsdil & Kristina Striegnitz - 2004 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 13 (2):187-206.
    We combine state-of-the-art techniques from computational linguisticsand theorem proving to build an engine for playing text adventures,computer games with which the player interacts purely through naturallanguage. The system employs a parser for dependency grammar and ageneration system based on TAG, and has components for resolving andgenerating referring expressions. Most of these modules make heavy useof inferences offered by a modern theorem prover for descriptionlogic. Our game engine solves some problems inherent in classical textadventures, and is an interesting test case (...)
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  9.  64
    Speech and Language Processing: An Introduction to Natural Language Processing, Computational Linguistics, and Speech Recognition.Daniel Jurafsky & James H. Martin - 2000 - Prentice-Hall.
    The first of its kind to thoroughly cover language technology at all levels and with all modern technologies this book takes an empirical approach to the ...
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  10.  55
    Group Theory and Computational Linguistics.Marc Dymetman - 1998 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 7 (4):461-497.
    There is currently much interest in bringing together the tradition of categorial grammar, and especially the Lambek calculus, with the recent paradigm of linear logic to which it has strong ties. One active research area is designing non-commutative versions of linear logic (Abrusci, 1995; Retoré, 1993) which can be sensitive to word order while retaining the hypothetical reasoning capabilities of standard (commutative) linear logic (Dalrymple et al., 1995). Some connections between the Lambek calculus and computations in groups have long been (...)
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  11.  25
    Linguistics, Computational Linguistics and Cognitive Science.Nick Chater & Christopher D. Manning - 2006 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (7):335-344.
  12.  5
    Logical Aspects of Computational Linguistics (LACL'01).Philippe de Groote, Glyn Morrill & Christian Retoré - 2001 - In P. Bouquet (ed.), Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
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  13.  4
    Alexander Koller, Ralph Debusmann, Malte Gabsdil, and Kristina Striegnitz/Put My Galakmid Coin Into the Dispenser and Kick It: Computational Linguistics and Theorem Proving in a Computer Game 187–206.Gerhard Jager & Structural Rules Residuation - 2004 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 13:537-539.
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  14. Computational Linguistics Meets Philosophy: A Latent Semantic Analy-Sis of Giordano Bruno's Texts.Simonetta Bassi, Felice Dell'orletta, Daniele Esposito & Alessandro Lenci - 2006 - Rinascimento 46:631-647.
     
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  15. Computational Linguistics Research-Corpus-Based Knowledge Acquisition-Web-Based Measurements of Intra-Collocational Cohesion in Oxford Collocations Dictionary.Igor A. Bolshakov & Sofia N. Galicia-Haro - 2006 - In O. Stock & M. Schaerf (eds.), Lecture Notes in Computer Science. Springer Verlag. pp. 3878--93.
     
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  16. Roland HAUSSER: Foundations of Computational Linguistics: Human-Computer Communication in Natural Language.Paul Gochet & Michel Kefer - forthcoming - Revue Internationale de Philosophie.
     
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  17. Hebrew Computational Linguistics: A Bulletin for Formal, Computational, Applied Linguistics, and Modern Hebrew.Alan S. Kaye & Ora Scharzwald - 1982 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 102 (1):195.
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  18.  34
    Proceedings of the 26th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (SUNY Buffalo).Janyce M. Wiebe & William J. Rapaport (eds.) - 1988 - Assoc for computational linguistics.
    Narrative passages told from a character's perspective convey the character's thoughts and perceptions. We present a discourse process that recognizes characters' thoughts and perceptions in third-person narrative. An effect of perspective on reference In narrative is addressed: references in passages told from the perspective of a character reflect the character's beliefs. An algorithm that uses the results of our discourse process to understand references with respect to an appropriate set of beliefs is presented.
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  19. A Computational Theory of Perspective and Reference in Narrative.Janyce M. Wiebe & William J. Rapaport - 1988 - In Proceedings of the 26th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics. Association for Computational Linguistics.
    Narrative passages told from a character's perspective convey the character's thoughts and perceptions. We present a discourse process that recognizes characters'.
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  20.  9
    Relational and Role-Governed Categories: Views From Psychology, Computational Modeling, and Linguistics.Micah B. Goldwater, Noah D. Goodman, Stephen Wechsler & Gregory L. Murphy - 2009 - In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society.
  21.  4
    Berwick and Weinberg on Linguistics and Computational Psychology.Edward P. Stabler - 1984 - Cognition 17 (2):155-179.
  22.  14
    Computational Semantics—Linguistics and Processing.John Nerbonne - 1996 - In Shalom Lappin (ed.), The Handbook of Contemporary Semantic Theory. Blackwell Reference. pp. 459--82.
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  23.  1
    Linguistics Must Be Computational Too.D. Terence Langendoen - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (3):470-471.
  24.  16
    Computational Lexical Semantics.Patrick Saint-Dizier & Evelyne Viegas (eds.) - 1995 - Cambridge University Press.
    Lexical semantics has become a major research area within computational linguistics, drawing from psycholinguistics, knowledge representation, computer algorithms and architecture. Research programmes whose goal is the definition of large lexicons are asking what the appropriate representation structure is for different facets of lexical information. Among these facets, semantic information is probably the most complex and the least explored.Computational Lexical Semantics is one of the first volumes to provide models for the creation of various kinds of computerised lexicons (...)
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  25. On Linguistics in Philosophy, and Philosophy in Linguistics.James Higginbotham - 2002 - Linguistics and Philosophy 25 (5-6):573-584.
    After reviewing some major features of theinteractions between Linguistics and Philosophyin recent years, I suggest that the depth and breadthof current inquiry into semanticshas brought this subject into contact both with questionsof the nature of linguistic competence and with modern andtraditional philosophical study of the nature ofour thoughts, and the problems of metaphysics.I see this development as promising for thefuture of both subjects.
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  26.  70
    Questions in Dialogue.Nicholas Asher & Alex Lascarides - 1998 - Linguistics and Philosophy 21 (3):237-309.
    In this paper we explore how compositional semantics, discourse structure, and the cognitive states of participants all contribute to pragmatic constraints on answers to questions in dialogue. We synthesise formal semantic theories on questions and answers with techniques for discourse interpretation familiar from computational linguistics, and show how this provides richer constraints on responses in dialogue than either component can achieve alone.
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  27.  26
    Twenty-Five Years of Linguistics and Philosophy.Francis Jeffry Pelletier & Richmond H. Thomason - 2002 - Linguistics and Philosophy 25 (5-6):507-529.
  28.  10
    Towards Computational Rhetoric.Floriana Grasso - 2002 - Informal Logic 22 (3).
    The notions of argument and argumentation have become increasingly ubiquitous in Artificial Intelligence research, with various application and interpretations. Less attention has been, however, specifically devoted to rhetorical argument The work presented in this paper aims at bridging this gap, by proposing a framework for characterising rhetorical argumentation, based on Perelman and Olbrechts-Tyteca's New Rhetoric. The paper provides an overview of the state of the art of computational work based on, or dealing with, rhetorical aspects of argumentation, before presenting (...)
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  29. Beyond Rigidity: The Unfinished Semantic Agenda of Naming and Necessity.Scott Soames - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    In this fascinating work, Scott Soames offers a new conception of the relationship between linguistic meaning and assertions made by utterances. He gives meanings of proper names and natural kind predicates and explains their use in attitude ascriptions. He also demonstrates the irrelevance of rigid designation in understanding why theoretical identities containing such predicates are necessary, if true.
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  30. Commonsense Metaphysics and Lexical Semantics.Jerry R. Hobbs, William Croft, Todd Davies, Douglas Edwards & Kenneth Laws - 1987 - Computational Linguistics 13 (3&4):241-250.
    In the TACITUS project for using commonsense knowledge in the understanding of texts about mechanical devices and their failures, we have been developing various commonsense theories that are needed to mediate between the way we talk about the behavior of such devices and causal models of their operation. Of central importance in this effort is the axiomatization of what might be called commonsense metaphysics. This includes a number of areas that figure in virtually every domain of discourse, such as granularity, (...)
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  31.  54
    Computational Analyses of Multilevel Discourse Comprehension.Arthur C. Graesser & Danielle S. McNamara - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):371-398.
    The proposed multilevel framework of discourse comprehension includes the surface code, the textbase, the situation model, the genre and rhetorical structure, and the pragmatic communication level. We describe these five levels when comprehension succeeds and also when there are communication misalignments and comprehension breakdowns. A computer tool has been developed, called Coh-Metrix, that scales discourse (oral or print) on dozens of measures associated with the first four discourse levels. The measurement of these levels with an automated tool helps researchers track (...)
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  32.  45
    The Language of Word Meaning.Pierrette Bouillon & Federica Busa (eds.) - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    This volume is a collection of original contributions from outstanding scholars in linguistics, philosophy and computational linguistics exploring the relation between word meaning and human linguistic creativity. The papers present different aspects surrounding the question of what is word meaning, a problem that has been the center of heated debate in all those disciplines that directly or indirectly are concerned with the study of language and of human cognition. The discussions are centered around the newly emerging view (...)
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  33.  10
    Reference and Computation: An Essay in Applied Philosophy of Language.Amichai Kronfeld - 1990 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book deals with a major problem in the study of language: the problem of reference. The ease with which we refer to things in conversation is deceptive. Upon closer scrutiny, it turns out that we hardly ever tell each other explicitly what object we mean, although we expect our interlocutor to discern it. Amichai Kronfeld provides an answer to two questions associated with this: how do we successfully refer, and how can a computer be programmed to achieve this? Beginning (...)
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  34.  21
    Artificial Speech and Its Authors.Philip J. Nickel - 2013 - Minds and Machines 23 (4):489-502.
    Some of the systems used in natural language generation (NLG), a branch of applied computational linguistics, have the capacity to create or assemble somewhat original messages adapted to new contexts. In this paper, taking Bernard Williams’ account of assertion by machines as a starting point, I argue that NLG systems meet the criteria for being speech actants to a substantial degree. They are capable of authoring original messages, and can even simulate illocutionary force and speaker meaning. Background intelligence (...)
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  35. Toward a Computational Theory of Pragmatics Discourse, Presupposition, and Implicature.Takao Gunji - 1982 - Indiana University Linguistics Club.
  36.  5
    Problems of Context and Knowledge.Jacques Jayez - 1989 - Argumentation 3 (3):303-319.
    In spite of alleged differences in purpose, descriptive and computational linguistics share many problems, due to the fact that any precise study on language needs some form of knowledge representation. This constraint is mostly apparent when interpretation of sentences takes into account elements of the so-called “context”. The parametrization of context, i.e. the explicit listing of features relevant to some intepretation task, is difficult because it requires flexible formal structures for understanding or simulating inferential behaviour, as well as (...)
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  37.  4
    Semantic Processing for Finite Domains.Martha Stone Palmer - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    A primary problem in the area of natural language processing has been semantic analysis. This book looks at the semantics of natural languages in context. It presents an approach to the computational processing of English text that combines current theories of knowledge representation and reasoning in Artificial Intelligence with the latest linguistic views of lexical semantics. The book will interest postgraduates and researchers in computational linguistics as well as industrial research groups specializing in natural language processing.
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  38.  2
    Learning General Phonological Rules From Distributional Information: A Computational Model.Shira Calamaro & Gaja Jarosz - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (3):647-666.
    Phonological rules create alternations in the phonetic realizations of related words. These rules must be learned by infants in order to identify the phonological inventory, the morphological structure, and the lexicon of a language. Recent work proposes a computational model for the learning of one kind of phonological alternation, allophony . This paper extends the model to account for learning of a broader set of phonological alternations and the formalization of these alternations as general rules. In Experiment 1, we (...)
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  39.  17
    Applying Pregroups to Italian Statements and Questions.Claudia Casadio - 2007 - Studia Logica 87 (2-3):253-268.
    We know from the literature in theoretical linguistics that interrogative constructions in Italian have particular syntactic properties, due to the liberal word order and the rich inflectional system. In this paper we show that the calculus of pregroups represents a flexible and efficient computational device for the analysis and derivation of Italian sentences and questions. In this context the distinction between direct vs. indirect statements and questions is explored.
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  40. Context Dependence, Disagreement, and Predicates of Personal Taste.Peter Lasersohn - 2005 - Linguistics and Philosophy 28 (6):643--686.
    This paper argues that truth values of sentences containing predicates of “personal taste” such as fun or tasty must be relativized to individuals. This relativization is of truth value only, and does not involve a relativization of semantic content: If you say roller coasters are fun, and I say they are not, I am negating the same content which you assert, and directly contradicting you. Nonetheless, both our utterances can be true (relative to their separate contexts). A formal semantic theory (...)
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  41. Common Ground.Robert Stalnaker - 2002 - Linguistics and Philosophy 25 (5-6):701-721.
  42. Unarticulated Constituents.François Recanati - 2002 - Linguistics and Philosophy 25 (3):299-345.
    In a recent paper (Linguistics and Philosophy 23, 4, June 2000), Jason Stanley argues that there are no `unarticulated constituents', contrary to what advocates of Truth-conditional pragmatics (TCP) have claimed. All truth-conditional effects of context can be traced to logical form, he says. In this paper I maintain that there are unarticulated constituents, and I defend TCP. Stanley's argument exploits the fact that the alleged unarticulated constituents can be `bound', that is, they can be made to vary with the (...)
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  43. Context and Logical Form.Jason Stanley - 2000 - Linguistics and Philosophy 23 (4):391--434.
    In this paper, I defend the thesis that alleffects of extra-linguistic context on thetruth-conditions of an assertion are traceable toelements in the actual syntactic structure of thesentence uttered. In the first section, I develop thethesis in detail, and discuss its implications for therelation between semantics and pragmatics. The nexttwo sections are devoted to apparent counterexamples.In the second section, I argue that there are noconvincing examples of true non-sentential assertions.In the third section, I argue that there are noconvincing examples of what (...)
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  44.  70
    Computational Complexity of Polyadic Lifts of Generalized Quantifiers in Natural Language.Jakub Szymanik - 2010 - Linguistics and Philosophy 33 (3):215-250.
    We study the computational complexity of polyadic quantifiers in natural language. This type of quantification is widely used in formal semantics to model the meaning of multi-quantifier sentences. First, we show that the standard constructions that turn simple determiners into complex quantifiers, namely Boolean operations, iteration, cumulation, and resumption, are tractable. Then, we provide an insight into branching operation yielding intractable natural language multi-quantifier expressions. Next, we focus on a linguistic case study. We use computational complexity results to (...)
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  45. Unarticulated Constituents Revisited.Luisa Martí - 2006 - Linguistics and Philosophy 29 (2):135 - 166.
    An important debate in the current literature is whether “all truth-conditional effects of extra-linguistic context can be traced to [a variable at; LM] logical form” (Stanley, ‘Context and Logical Form’, Linguistics and Philosophy, 23 (2000) 391). That is, according to Stanley, the only truth-conditional effects that extra-linguistic context has are localizable in (potentially silent) variable-denoting pronouns or pronoun-like items, which are represented in the syntax/at logical form (pure indexicals like I or today are put aside in this discussion). According (...)
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  46. Facts: Particulars or Information Units? [REVIEW]Angelika Kratzer - 2002 - Linguistics and Philosophy 25 (5-6):655-670.
    What are facts, situations, or events? When Situation Semantics was born in the eighties, I objected because I could not swallow the idea that situations might be chunks of information. For me, they had to be particulars like sticks or bricks. I could not imagine otherwise. The first manuscript of “An Investigation of the Lumps of Thought” that I submitted to Linguistics and Philosophy had a footnote where I distanced myself from all those who took possible situations to be (...)
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  47.  22
    Ways of Scope Taking.Anna Szabolcsi (ed.) - 1997 - Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    Ways of Scope Taking is concerned with syntactic, semantic and computational aspects of scope. Its starting point is the well-known but often neglected fact that different types of quantifiers interact differently with each other and other operators. The theoretical examination of significant bodies of data, both old and novel, leads to two central claims. (1) Scope is a by-product of a set of distinct Logical Form processes; each quantifier participates in those that suit its particular features. (2) Scope interaction (...)
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  48.  33
    A Modal Perspective on the Computational Complexity of Attribute Value Grammar.Patrick Blackburn & Edith Spaan - 1993 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 2 (2):129-169.
    Many of the formalisms used in Attribute Value grammar are notational variants of languages of propositional modal logic, and testing whether two Attribute Value Structures unify amounts to testing for modal satisfiability. In this paper we put this observation to work. We study the complexity of the satisfiability problem for nine modal languages which mirror different aspects of AVS description formalisms, including the ability to express re-entrancy, the ability to express generalisations, and the ability to express recursive constraints. Two main (...)
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  49. The Myth of Conventional Implicature.Kent Bach - 1999 - Linguistics and Philosophy 22 (4):327-366.
    Grice’s distinction between what is said and what is implicated has greatly clarified our understanding of the boundary between semantics and pragmatics. Although border disputes still arise and there are certain difficulties with the distinction itself (see the end of §1), it is generally understood that what is said falls on the semantic side and what is implicated on the pragmatic side. But this applies only to what is..
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  50.  35
    Scalar Implicatures in Complex Sentences.Uli Sauerland - 2004 - Linguistics and Philosophy 27 (3):367-391.
    This article develops a Gricean account for the computation of scalarimplicatures in cases where one scalar term is in the scope ofanother. It shows that a cross-product of two quantitative scalesyields the appropriate scale for many such cases. One exception iscases involving disjunction. For these, I propose an analysis that makesuse of a novel, partially ordered quantitative scale for disjunction andcapitalizes on the idea that implicatures may have different epistemic status.
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