30 found
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  1. A Broader Understanding of Moral Distress.Stephen M. Campbell, Connie M. Ulrich & Christine Grady - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (12):2-9.
    On the traditional view, moral distress arises only in cases where an individual believes she knows the morally right thing to do but fails to perform that action due to various constraints. We seek to motivate a broader understanding of moral distress. We begin by presenting six types of distress that fall outside the bounds of the traditional definition and explaining why they should be recognized as forms of moral distress. We then propose and defend a new and more expansive (...)
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  2.  70
    Covid‐19: Ethical Challenges for Nurses.Georgina Morley, Christine Grady, Joan McCarthy & Connie M. Ulrich - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (3):35-39.
    The Covid‐19 pandemic has highlighted many of the difficult ethical issues that health care professionals confront in caring for patients and families. The decisions such workers face on the front lines are fraught with uncertainty for all stakeholders. Our focus is on the implications for nurses, who are the largest global health care workforce but whose perspectives are not always fully considered. This essay discusses three overarching ethical issues that create a myriad of concerns and will likely affect nurses globally (...)
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  3.  64
    Does ethics education influence the moral action of practicing nurses and social workers?Christine Grady, Marion Danis, Karen L. Soeken, Patricia O'Donnell, Carol Taylor, Adrienne Farrar & Connie M. Ulrich - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (4):4 – 11.
    Purpose/methods: This study investigated the relationship between ethics education and training, and the use and usefulness of ethics resources, confidence in moral decisions, and moral action/activism through a survey of practicing nurses and social workers from four United States (US) census regions. Findings: The sample (n = 1215) was primarily Caucasian (83%), female (85%), well educated (57% with a master's degree). no ethics education at all was reported by 14% of study participants (8% of social workers had no ethics education, (...)
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  4.  99
    Moral Distress: A Growing Problem in the Health Professions?Connie M. Ulrich, Ann B. Hamric & Christine Grady - 2010 - Hastings Center Report 40 (1):20-22.
  5.  13
    Ethical Challenges Experienced by Clinical Ethicists during COVID-19.Connie M. Ulrich, Janet A. Deatrick, Jesse Wool, Liming Huang, Nancy Berlinger & Christine Grady - 2023 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 14 (1):1-14.
    Background The COVID-19 pandemic continues to disrupt every society as SARs-CoV-2 variants surge among the populations. Health care providers are exhausted, becoming ill themselves, and in some instances have died. Indeed, hospitals are struggling to find staff to care for critically ill patients most in need. Previous work has reported on the unending work-related conditions that hospital staff are laboring under and their subsequent mental and physical health strains. Health care providers need support, but it is not clear where that (...)
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  6.  11
    Parent moral distress in serious pediatric illness: A dimensional analysis.Kim Mooney-Doyle & Connie M. Ulrich - 2020 - Nursing Ethics 27 (3):821-837.
    Background: Moral distress is an important and well-studied phenomenon among nurses and other healthcare providers, yet the conceptualization of parental moral distress remains unclear. Objective: The objective of this dimensional analysis was to describe the nature of family moral distress in serious pediatric illness. Design and methods: A dimensional analysis of articles retrieved from a librarian-assisted systematic review of Scopus, CINAHL, and PsychInfo was conducted, focusing on how children, parents, other family members, and healthcare providers describe parental moral distress, both (...)
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  7.  14
    The Moral Distress of Patients and Families.Connie M. Ulrich - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):68-70.
    Volume 20, Issue 6, June 2020, Page 68-70.
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  8.  24
    What Nurse Bioethicists Bring to Bioethics: The Journey of a Nurse Bioethicist.Connie M. Ulrich - 2017 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 60 (1):33-46.
    Istarted my nursing career as a pediatric nurse working with children and their families at the Children's Hospital National Medical Center in Washington, DC. My first position was a staff nurse on a busy surgical floor called 4 Blue. To some degree, and as I reflect on that time, one is never truly prepared as a newly minted nurse or physician for the realities of becoming a clinician. So it was for me. I initially worked a rotational schedule of two (...)
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  9.  53
    Cancer clinical trial participants' assessment of risk and benefit.Connie M. Ulrich, Sarah J. Ratcliffe, Gwenyth R. Wallen, Qiuping Zhou, Kathleen Knafl & Christine Grady - 2016 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 7 (1):8-16.
  10.  25
    Everyday ethical challenges of nurse-physician collaboration.Motshedisi Sabone, Pelonomi Mazonde, Francesca Cainelli, Maseba Maitshoko, Renatha Joseph, Judith Shayo, Baraka Morris, Marjorie Muecke, Barbra Mann Wall, Linda Hoke, Lilian Peng, Kim Mooney-Doyle & Connie M. Ulrich - 2020 - Nursing Ethics 27 (1):206-220.
    Background:Collaboration between physicians and nurses is key to improving patient care. We know very little about collaboration and interdisciplinary practice in African healthcare settings.Research question/aim:The purpose of this study was to explore the ethical challenges of interdisciplinary collaboration in clinical practice and education in Botswana Participants and research context: This qualitative descriptive study was conducted with 39 participants (20 physicians and 19 nurses) who participated in semi-structured interviews at public hospitals purposely selected to represent the three levels of hospitals in (...)
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  11.  17
    Qualitative inquiry into adolescents’ experience of ethical challenges during enrollment and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Temeke Regional Referral Hospital, Tanzania.Connie M. Ulrich, Gasto Frumence, Gladys Reuben Mahiti & Renatha Sillo Joseph - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1):1-9.
    BackgroundAdolescents living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) experience challenges, including lack of involvement in their care as well nondisclosure of HIV status, which leads to poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Parents have authority over their children, but during adolescence there is an increasing desire for independence. The aim of the study was to explore adolescents’ experience of challenges identified by adolescents ages 10–19 years attending HIV care and treatment at Temeke Regional Referral Hospital in Tanzania. MethodsAn exploratory descriptive qualitative (...)
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  12. Hypothetical vignettes in empirical bioethics research.Connie M. Ulrich & Sarah J. Ratcliffe - 2007 - Advances in Bioethics 11:161-181.
     
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  13.  37
    Ethical frameworks for surrogates’ end-of-life planning experiences.Hyejin Kim, Janet A. Deatrick & Connie M. Ulrich - 2017 - Nursing Ethics 24 (1):46-69.
    Background:Despite the growing body of knowledge about surrogate decision making, we know very little about the use of ethical frameworks (including ethical theories, principles, and concepts) to understand surrogates’ day-to-day experiences in end-of-life care planning for incapacitated adults.Objectives and Methods:This qualitative systematic review was conducted to identify the types of ethical frameworks used to address surrogates’ experiences in end-of-life care planning for incapacitated adults as well as the most common themes or patterns found in surrogate decision-making research.Findings:Seven research papers explicitly (...)
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  14.  23
    Nurses at the Table.Connie M. Ulrich - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (S1):2-4.
    Few bioethicists are educated with a view into nursing. Thus, much of the conceptual and empirical research on ethical issues in nursing practice has been conducted by nurse ethicists themselves and, to a lesser degree, by individuals with a strong interest in nursing ethics. Although this work has internally shaped nursing practice, education, and policy, the broader field of bioethics has seldom examined and acknowledged the everyday ethical concerns of practicing nurses and their important contributions to bioethics discourse. In this (...)
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  15.  48
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “A Broader Understanding of Moral Distress”.Stephen M. Campbell, Connie M. Ulrich & Christine Grady - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (12):1-3.
  16.  24
    Informed Consent among Clinical Trial Participants with Different Cancer Diagnoses.Connie M. Ulrich, Sarah J. Ratcliffe, Camille J. Hochheimer, Qiuping Zhou, Liming Huang, Thomas Gordon, Kathleen Knafl, Therese Richmond, Marilyn M. Schapira, Victoria Miller, Jun J. Mao, Mary Naylor & Christine Grady - forthcoming - AJOB Empirical Bioethics.
    Importance Informed consent is essential to ethical, rigorous research and is important to recruitment and retention in cancer trials.Objective To examine cancer clinical trial (CCT) participants’ perceptions of informed consent processes and variations in perceptions by cancer type.Design and Setting and Participants Cross-sectional survey from mixed-methods study at National Cancer Institute–designated Northeast comprehensive cancer center. Open-ended and forced-choice items addressed: (1) enrollment and informed consent experiences and (2) decision-making processes, including risk-benefit assessment. Eligibility: CCT participant with gastro-intestinal or genitourinary, hematologic-lymphatic (...)
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  17.  48
    A Path Analytic Model of Ethical Conflict in Practice and Autonomy in a Sample of Nurse Practitioners.Connie M. Ulrich & Karen L. Soeken - 2005 - Nursing Ethics 12 (3):305-316.
    The purpose of this study was to test a causal model of ethical conflict in practice and autonomy in a sample of 254 nurse practitioners working in the primary care areas of family health, pediatrics, adult health and obstetrics/gynecology in the state of Maryland. A test of the model was conducted using a path analytic approach with LISREL 8.30 hypothesizing individual, organizational and societal/market factors influencing ethical conflict in practice and autonomy. Maximum likelihood estimation was used to estimate the parameters (...)
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  18.  27
    The value of nurse bioethicists.Connie M. Ulrich & Christine Grady - 2023 - Nursing Ethics 30 (5):701-709.
    Background The field of nursing has long been concerned with ethical issues. The history of the nursing profession has a rich legacy of attention to social justice and to societal questions regarding issues of fairness, access, equity, and equality. Some nurses have found that their clinical experiences spur an interest in ethical patient care, and many are now nurse bioethicists, having pursued additional training in bioethics and related fields (e.g., psychology, sociology). Purpose The authors describe how the clinical and research (...)
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  19.  23
    Communicating With Pediatric Families at End-of-Life Is Not a Fantasy.Connie M. Ulrich, Kim Mooney-Doyle & Christine Grady - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (1):14-16.
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  20.  31
    Respondent Burden in Clinical Research: When Are We Asking Too Much of Subjects?Connie M. Ulrich, Gwenyth R. Wallen, Autumn Feister & Christine Grady - 2005 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 27 (4):17.
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  21.  20
    Measuring Moral Distress and its Various Sources.Connie M. Ulrich & Christine Grady - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics 23 (4):63-65.
    Moral distress is indeed distressing for those who experience it and whose sense of integrity can be shaken by exposure to events or situations that test their core values and ethical belief system...
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  22.  6
    Ethical considerations in evaluating discharge readiness from the intensive care unit.Sang Bin You & Connie M. Ulrich - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics.
    Evaluating readiness for discharge from the intensive care unit (ICU) is a critical aspect of patient care. Whereas evidence-based criteria for ICU admission have been established, practical criteria for discharge from the ICU are lacking. Often discharge guidelines simply state that a patient no longer meets ICU admission criteria. Such discharge criteria can be interpreted differently by different healthcare providers, leaving a clinical void where misunderstandings of patients’ readiness can conflict with perceptions of what readiness means for patients, families, and (...)
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  23.  26
    Evaluating nurse understanding and participation in the informed consent process.Sydney A. Axson, Nicholas A. Giordano, Robin M. Hermann & Connie M. Ulrich - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (4):1050-1061.
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  24.  44
    Response to Peer Commentary on “Does Ethics Education Influence the Moral Action of Practicing Nurses and Social Workers?”.Christine Grady, Marion Danis, Karen L. Soeken, Patricia O'Donnell, Carol Taylor, Adrienne Farrar & Connie M. Ulrich - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (4):1-2.
  25.  29
    Expectations for Function and Independence by Childhood Brain Tumors Survivors and Their Mothers.Matthew S. Lucas, Lamia P. Barakat, Nora L. Jones, Connie M. Ulrich & Janet A. Deatrick - 2014 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 4 (3):233-251.
    Survivors of childhood brain tumors face many obstacles to living independently as adults. Causes for lack of independence are multifactorial and generally are investigated in terms of physical, cognitive, and psychosocial treatment–related sequelae. Little is known, however, about the role of expectation for survivors’ function. From a mixed–methods study including qualitative interviews and quantitative measures from 40 caregiver–survivor dyads, we compared the data within and across dyads, identifying four distinct narrative profiles: (A) convergent expectations about an optimistic future, (B) convergent (...)
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  26.  20
    COVID-19: Advancing Empirical Bioethics Research.Connie M. Ulrich, Emily E. Anderson & Jennifer K. Walter - 2020 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 11 (3):145-147.
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  27.  30
    End-of-Life Futility Conversations: When Language Matters.Connie M. Ulrich - 2018 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 60 (3):433-437.
    Caring for seriously ill patients and their families during times of extreme stress is a privilege, but it can also bring much sadness and ethical turmoil for everyone involved, particularly at end of life. Patients and their families and the nurses and physicians who care for them are uniquely bonded together as they discuss, discern, and deliberate on some of the most heart-wrenching life and death decisions any patient, parent, family member, or partner can make. Shifting from a curative mode (...)
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  28.  22
    Nurse Practitioners: What Does the Public Need to Know?Connie M. Ulrich - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):14-15.
  29.  31
    Emergency Nursing, Ebola, and Public Policy: The Contributions of Nursing to the Public Policy Conversation.Lisa Wolf, Connie M. Ulrich & Christine Grady - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (S1):35-38.
    Excellent patient care within the emergency department requires interdisciplinary training, teamwork, and communication to manage the chaos of the environment. Specifically, invasive procedures required to manage airway, breathing, and circulation via intubation, chest compressions, and establishing intravenous access can provide a direct benefit to save lives but also have the potential to harm both patients and health care clinicians alike; emergency health care clinicians can be exposed to significant amounts of blood and body fluids as well as other threats of (...)
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  30.  35
    Cancer Clinical Trial Patient-Participants’ Perceptions about Provider Communication and Dropout Intentions.Qiuping Zhou, Sarah J. Ratcliffe, Christine Grady, Tianhao Wang, Jun J. Mao & Connie M. Ulrich - 2019 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 10 (3):190-200.
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