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  1.  7
    Mindfulness as a Pathway to Classroom Focus and Self-Love.Connie Titone, Jennifer Zymet & Vivianne Alves de Sa - 2016 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 26 (1):3-36.
    This mixed-method design aimed to determine how practicing mindfulness in a high school classroom influences students’ academic focus and affective experience. Thirty-nine tenth-grade students participated in an eight-week intervention, in which they practiced mindfulness activities led by their certified English and yoga teacher once per week. Students completed a pre- and posttest Likert-scale survey to measure mindfulness using Greco, Baer, and Smith’s Child and Adolescent Mindfulness Measure (CAMM) as well as three, open-ended post-test reflection questions. The survey data were analyzed (...)
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  2.  10
    Pulling Back the Curtain: Relearning the History of the Philosophy of Education 1.Connie Titone - 2007 - Educational Studies 41 (2):128-147.
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  3.  8
    Trees of My Louisiana.Connie Titone - 2006 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 16 (1):36-45.
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  4.  37
    Virtue, reason, and the false public voice: Catharine macaulay's philosophy of moral education.Connie Titone - 2009 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (1):91-108.
    Catharine Macaulay, an 18th century English historian, published her educational philosophy in Letters on Education with Observations on Religious and Metaphysical Subjects in 1790. The ultimate goal of her educational process, to ‘bring the human mind to such a height of perfection as shall induce the practice of the best morals’, is examined in this paper. Her ideas about the interactions among benevolence, sympathy, reason and the public voice with regard to the education of the moral, virtuous person are considered. (...)
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  5.  12
    Virtue, Reason, and the False Public Voice: Catharine Macaulay's Philosophy of Moral Education.Connie Titone - 2009 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (1):91-108.
    Catharine Macaulay, an 18th century English historian, published her educational philosophy in Letters on Education with Observations on Religious and Metaphysical Subjects in 1790. The ultimate goal of her educational process, to ‘bring the human mind to such a height of perfection as shall induce the practice of the best morals’, (, p. 173) is examined in this paper. Her ideas about the interactions among benevolence, sympathy, reason and the public voice with regard to the education of the moral, virtuous (...)
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  6.  12
    Waking from Dysconsciousness: Assessing Racism in Three University Classrooms.Connie Titone, Edward Fierros, Krista Malott, Matthew Simpson & Gregory LaLuna - 2014 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 24 (2):3-26.
    This research provides suggestions for identifying and addressing university students’ perceptions of systemic inequities related to racism and racial privilege.Suggestions are derived from findings of a confirmatory study conducted by the authors in three university classrooms. The project was motivated by theauthors’ on-going commitment to the struggle to eradicate racism and all of its deleterious effects, predicated on the early work of Dr. Joyce King and her conceptof dysconscious racism. The university students’ levels of dysconsciousness regarding systemic inequities related to (...)
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    Student Responses to the Women's Reclamation Work in the Philosophy of Education.Teresa Genevieve Wojcik & Connie Titone - 2013 - Educational Studies: A Jrnl of the American Educ. Studies Assoc 49 (1):32-44.
    Reclamation work denotes the process of uncovering the lost contributions of women to the philosophy of education, analyzing their works, making them accessible to a larger audience, and (re)introducing them to the historical record and canon. Since the 1970s, scholars have been engaged in the reclamation work, thus making available to students, professors, and researchers a rich and varied perspective for tracing the evolution of educational thought. This article shares the responses of undergraduate and graduate students to discussing the reclamation (...)
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