Results for 'Conor Gearty'

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  1. The Struggle for Civil Liberties: Political Freedom and the Rule of Law in Britain, 1914-1945.Keith Ewing & Conor Anthony Gearty - 2000 - Oxford University Press UK.
    'This is a powerful piece of advocacy. I'd pick Ewing and Gearty for my counsels any day.' -Bernard Porter, LRBThis book is an account of the struggle for civil liberties against the State in which groups such as the anti-war protestors, the Irish nationalists, the Communist party, trade unionists, and the unemployed workers' movement found themselves involved in the first half of the twentieth century. All had to fight for their civil liberties in the face of strong opposition from (...)
     
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  2.  7
    The Superpatriotic Fervour of the Moment.Conor Gearty - 2008 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 28 (1):183-200.
  3.  26
    The Meanings of Rights: The Philosophy and Social Theory of Human Rights.Costas Douzinas & Conor Gearty (eds.) - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    Questioning some of the repetitive and narrow theoretical writings on rights, a group of leading intellectuals examine human rights from philosophical, theological, historical, literary and political perspectives.
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  4. Objectivism and Perspectivism About the Epistemic Ought.McHugh Conor - 2017 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 4.
    What ought you believe? According to a traditional view, it depends on your evidence: you ought to believe (only) what your evidence supports. Recently, however, some have claimed that what you ought to believe depends not on your evidence but simply on what is true: you ought to believe (only) the truth. In this paper, we present and defend two arguments against this latter view. We also explore some of the parallels between this debate in epistemology, and the debate in (...)
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  5.  21
    How Do You Choose a Book for a Pre-Arrival Shared Reading Scheme in a University?Alison Baverstock, Jackie Steinitz, Laura Bryars, Kimberley Sheehan, Charlotte Butler, Allison Williams, Angelika Dalba, Dan Brixey, Adam Conor, Ciara Higgins & Elle Waddington - 2017 - Logos 28 (3):41-57.
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  6. Is Human Rights Speciesist?C. Gearty - 2009 - In Andrew Linzey (ed.), The Link Between Animal Abuse and Human Violence. Sussex Academic Press. pp. 175--183.
     
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  7.  18
    Conor Cruise O'Brien's Conservative Anti-Nationalism.Mark McNally - 2008 - European Journal of Political Theory 7 (3):308-330.
    From the early 1970s Conor Cruise O'Brien acquired a reputation in Ireland and internationally as one of the most vociferous critics of nationalism. While many see the origins of his critique in his reaction to the emergence of militant nationalism in Northern Ireland at this time, in this article I argue that the foundations of O'Brien's anti-nationalism had already been laid in the postwar European context. The article illustrates how O'Brien's historical and intellectual experience in the aftermath of the (...)
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  8.  12
    Thomas Boyer-Kassem, Conor Mayo-Wilson, and Michael Weisberg, Eds. Scientific Collaboration and Collective Knowledge: New Essays. [REVIEW]Remco Heesen - 2019 - Philosophy of Science 86 (1):192-198.
    Review of the volume "Scientific Collaboration and Collective Knowledge: New Essays", edited by Thomas Boyer-Kassem, Conor Mayo-Wilson, and Michael Weisberg.
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  9.  64
    Conor Cruise O'Brien.Brain Fallon - 2009 - The Chesterton Review 35 (1/2):206-212.
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  10.  7
    Iván Boronkai : Lexicon Latinitatis medii Aevi Hungaricae/A Magyar országi Küzépkori Latinság Szótára. Vol. II, Fasc. l/II Kötet, 1 Füzet caballa–cliciarius; Vol. II, Fasc. 2/II Kötet, 2 Füzet cliciarius–conor; Vol. III, Fasc. 2 /II Kötet, 3 Füzet conor–czwkarum. Pp. viii + 461. Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1991. Paper, $19, 300 Ft. per fascicle. [REVIEW]R. P. H. Green - 1992 - The Classical Review 42 (2):461-461.
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  11.  21
    Conor O’Brien, Bede’s Temple: An Image and Its Interpretation. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2015. Pp. Xx, 242; 3 Black-and-White Figures. $110. ISBN: 978-0-19-874708-6. [REVIEW]George Hardin Brown - 2017 - Speculum 92 (1):287-289.
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  12.  24
    The Medieval Castle in Ireland and Wales: Essays in Honour of Jeremy Knight. John R. Kenyon, Kieran O'Conor.Eric Klingelhöfer - 2005 - Speculum 80 (3):911-913.
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  13.  32
    The Great Melody: A Thematic Biography and Commented Anthology of Edmund Burke, by Conor Cruise O'Brien.John P. McCarthy - 1995 - The Chesterton Review 21 (1/2):139-147.
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  14.  1
    Conor Whately, Battles and Generals: Combat, Culture, and Didacticism in Procopius’ “Wars”. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2016. Pp. Xiii, 276. $149. ISBN: 978-90-04-31036-0. [REVIEW]Alexander Sarantis - 2019 - Speculum 94 (4):1243-1244.
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  15.  17
    Why the Ultra-Darwinists and the Creationists Both Get It Wrong by Conor Cunningham.Brendan Sweetman - 2015 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 15 (3):605-607.
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  16.  15
    The Social Structure of the First Crusade. . Conor Kostick.David Stewart Bachrach - 2009 - Speculum 84 (3):739-741.
  17.  35
    A Guide to the Phenomenology of Religion: Key Figures, Formative Influences and Subsequent Debates. By James L. Cox and Transcendence and Phenomenology. Edited by Peter M. Candler, Jr. And Conor Cunningham. [REVIEW]Vincent Lloyd - 2009 - Heythrop Journal 50 (3):558-559.
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  18.  27
    Iván Boronkai (ed.): Lexicon Latinitatis medii Aevi Hungaricae/A Magyar országi Küzépkori Latinság Szótára. Vol. II, Fasc. l/II Kötet, 1 Füzet caballa–cliciarius; Vol. II, Fasc. 2/II Kötet, 2 Füzet cliciarius–conor; Vol. III, Fasc. 2 (sic)/II Kötet, 3 Füzet conor–czwkarum. Pp. viii + 461. Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1991. Paper, $19, 300 Ft. per fascicle. [REVIEW]R. P. H. Green - 1992 - The Classical Review 42 (02):461-.
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  19.  7
    A Guide to the Phenomenology of Religion: Key Figures, Formative Influences and Subsequent Debates. By James L. Cox and Transcendence and Phenomenology. Edited by Peter M. Candler, Jr. And Conor Cunningham. [REVIEW]Vincent Lloyd - 2010 - Heythrop Journal 51 (3):516-518.
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  20.  1
    Conor Cunningham. Darwin's Pious Idea: Why the Ultra-Darwinists and Creationists Both Get It Wrong. Xx + 543 Pp., Illus., Index. Grand Rapids, Mich./Cambridge: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 2011. $34. [REVIEW]Frederick Gregory - 2012 - Isis 103 (2):429-431.
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  21. Conor Cruise O'Brien's "Albert Camus of Europe and Africa". [REVIEW]Richard Gambino - 1971 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 52 (1):146.
     
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  22. Review of Genealogy of Nihilism, by Conor Cunningham. [REVIEW]Malek K. Khazaee - 2005 - Essays in Philosophy 6 (1):273-280.
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  23. The Long Affair: Thomas Jefferson and the French Revolution, 1785-1800. By Conor Cruise O'Brien.J. T. Pekacz - 1998 - The European Legacy 3:147-147.
     
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  24.  63
    Genealogy of Nihilism: Philosophies of Nothing and the Difference of Theology.Conor Cunningham - 2002 - Routledge.
    Nihilism is the logic of nothing as something, which claims that Nothing Is. Its unmaking of things, and its forming of formless things, strain the fundamental terms of existence: what it is to be, to know, to be known. But nihilism, the antithesis of God, is also like theology. Where nihilism creates nothingness, condenses it to substance, God also makes nothingness creative. Negotiating the borders of spirit and substance, theology can ask the questions of nihilism that other disciplines do not (...)
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  25. Fittingness First.Conor McHugh & Jonathan Way - 2016 - Ethics 126 (3):575-606.
    According to the fitting-attitudes account of value, for X to be good is for it to be fitting to value X. But what is it for an attitude to be fitting? A popular recent view is that it is for there to be sufficient reason for the attitude. In this paper we argue that proponents of the fitting-attitudes account should reject this view and instead take fittingness as basic. In this way they avoid the notorious ‘wrong kind of reason’ problem, (...)
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  26. The Truth Norm of Belief.Conor Mchugh - 2012 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 93 (1):8-30.
    I argue that, if belief is subject to a norm of truth, then that norm is evaluative rather than prescriptive in character. No prescriptive norm of truth is both plausible as a norm that we are subject to, and also capable of explaining what the truth norm of belief is supposed to explain. Candidate prescriptive norms also have implausible consequences for the normative status of withholding belief. An evaluative norm fares better in all of these respects. I propose an evaluative (...)
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  27. What is Reasoning?Conor McHugh & Jonathan Way - 2018 - Mind 127 (505):167-196.
    Reasoning is a certain kind of attitude-revision. What kind? The aim of this paper is to introduce and defend a new answer to this question, based on the idea that reasoning is a goodness-fixing kind. Our central claim is that reasoning is a functional kind: it has a constitutive point or aim that fixes the standards for good reasoning. We claim, further, that this aim is to get fitting attitudes. We start by considering recent accounts of reasoning due to Ralph (...)
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  28. Exercising Doxastic Freedom.Conor McHugh - 2014 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88 (1):1-37.
    This paper defends the possibility of doxastic freedom, arguing that doxastic freedom should be modelled not on freedom of action but on freedom of intention. Freedom of action is exercised by agents like us, I argue, through voluntary control. This involves two conditions, intentions-reactivity and reasons-reactivity, that are not met in the case of doxastic states. Freedom of intention is central to our agency and to our moral responsibility, but is not exercised through voluntary control. I develop and defend an (...)
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  29. Fitting Belief.Conor McHugh - 2014 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 114 (2pt2):167-187.
    Beliefs can be correct or incorrect, and this standard of correctness is widely thought to be fundamental to epistemic normativity. But how should this standard be understood, and in what way is it so fundamental? I argue that we should resist understanding correctness for belief as either a prescriptive or an evaluative norm. Rather, we should understand it as an instance of the distinct normative category of fittingness for attitudes. This yields an attractive account of epistemic reasons.
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  30. What is Good Reasoning?Conor McHugh & Jonathan Way - 2018 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research:153-174.
    What makes the difference between good and bad reasoning? In this paper we defend a novel account of good reasoning—both theoretical and practical—according to which it preserves fittingness or correctness: good reasoning is reasoning which is such as to take you from fitting attitudes to further fitting attitudes, other things equal. This account, we argue, is preferable to two others that feature in the recent literature. The first, which has been made prominent by John Broome, holds that the standards of (...)
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  31.  90
    The Illusion of Exclusivity.Conor McHugh - 2015 - European Journal of Philosophy 23 (4):1117-1136.
    It is widely held that when you are deliberating about whether to believe some proposition p, only considerations relevant to the truth of p can be taken into account as reasons bearing on whether to believe p and motivate you accordingly. This thesis of exclusivity has significance for debates about the nature of belief, about control of belief, and about certain forms of evidentialism. In this paper I distinguish a strong and a weak version of exclusivity. I provide reason to (...)
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  32. Attitudinal Control.Conor McHugh - 2017 - Synthese 194 (8):2745-2762.
    Beliefs are held to norms in a way that seems to require control over what we believe. Yet we don’t control our beliefs at will, in the way we control our actions. I argue that this problem can be solved by recognising a different form of control, which we exercise when we revise our beliefs directly for reasons. We enjoy this form of attitudinal control not only over our beliefs, but also over other attitudes, including intentions—that is, over the will (...)
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  33. The Normativity of Belief.Conor McHugh & Daniel Whiting - 2014 - Analysis 74 (4):698-713.
    This is a survey of recent debates concerning the normativity of belief. We explain what the thesis that belief is normative involves, consider arguments for and against that thesis, and explore its bearing on debates in metaethics.
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  34. Against the Taking Condition.Conor McHugh & Jonathan Way - 2016 - Philosophical Issues 26 (1):314-331.
    According to Paul Boghossian and others, inference is subject to the taking condition: it necessarily involves the thinker taking his premises to support his conclusion, and drawing the conclusion because of that fact. Boghossian argues that this condition vindicates the idea that inference is an expression of agency, and that it has several other important implications too. However, we argue in this paper that the taking condition should be rejected. The condition gives rise to several serious prima facie problems and (...)
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  35. Epistemic Responsibility and Doxastic Agency.Conor McHugh - 2013 - Philosophical Issues 23 (1):132-157.
  36. Scoring Imprecise Credences: A Mildly Immodest Proposal.Conor Mayo-Wilson & Gregory Wheeler - 2016 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 92 (1):55-78.
    Jim Joyce argues for two amendments to probabilism. The first is the doctrine that credences are rational, or not, in virtue of their accuracy or “closeness to the truth” (1998). The second is a shift from a numerically precise model of belief to an imprecise model represented by a set of probability functions (2010). We argue that both amendments cannot be satisfied simultaneously. To do so, we employ a (slightly-generalized) impossibility theorem of Seidenfeld, Schervish, and Kadane (2012), who show that (...)
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  37. The Independence Thesis: When Individual and Social Epistemology Diverge.Conor Mayo-Wilson, Kevin J. S. Zollman & David Danks - 2011 - Philosophy of Science 78 (4):653-677.
    In the latter half of the twentieth century, philosophers of science have argued (implicitly and explicitly) that epistemically rational individuals might compose epistemically irrational groups and that, conversely, epistemically rational groups might be composed of epistemically irrational individuals. We call the conjunction of these two claims the Independence Thesis, as they together imply that methodological prescriptions for scientific communities and those for individual scientists might be logically independent of one another. We develop a formal model of scientific inquiry, define four (...)
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  38. Epistemic Deontology and Voluntariness.Conor McHugh - 2012 - Erkenntnis 77 (1):65-94.
    We tend to prescribe and appraise doxastic states in terms that are broadly deontic. According to a simple argument, such prescriptions and appraisals are improper, because they wrongly presuppose that our doxastic states are voluntary. One strategy for resisting this argument, recently endorsed by a number of philosophers, is to claim that our doxastic states are in fact voluntary (This strategy has been pursued by Steup 2008 ; Weatherson 2008 ). In this paper I argue that this strategy is neither (...)
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  39. Belief and Aims.Conor McHugh - 2012 - Philosophical Studies 160 (3):425-439.
    Does belief have an aim? According to the claim of exclusivity, non-truth-directed considerations cannot motivate belief within doxastic deliberation. This claim has been used to argue that, far from aiming at truth, belief is not aim-directed at all, because the regulation of belief fails to exhibit a kind of interaction among aims that is characteristic of ordinary aim-directed behaviour. The most prominent reply to this objection has been offered by Steglich-Petersen (Philos Stud 145:395–405, 2009), who claims that exclusivity is in (...)
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  40.  59
    Epistemic Decision Theory's Reckoning.Conor Mayo-Wilson & Gregory Wheeler - manuscript
    Epistemic decision theory (EDT) employs the mathematical tools of rational choice theory to justify epistemic norms, including probabilism, conditionalization, and the Principal Principle, among others. Practitioners of EDT endorse two theses: (1) epistemic value is distinct from subjective preference, and (2) belief and epistemic value can be numerically quantified. We argue the first thesis, which we call epistemic puritanism, undermines the second.
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  41. What Do We Aim At When We Believe?Conor Mchugh - 2011 - Dialectica 65 (3):369-392.
    It is often said that belief aims at truth. I argue that if belief has an aim then that aim is knowledge rather than merely truth. My main argument appeals to the impossibility of forming a belief on the basis of evidence that only weakly favours a proposition. This phenomenon, I argue, is a problem for the truth-aim hypothesis. By contrast, it can be given a simple and satisfying explanation on the knowledge-aim hypothesis. Furthermore, the knowledge-aim hypothesis suggests a very (...)
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  42.  56
    Defending Exclusivity.Sophie Archer - 2017 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 94 (2):326-341.
    ‘Exclusivity’ is the claim that when deliberating about whether to believe that p one can only be consciously motivated to reach one's conclusion by considerations one takes to pertain to the truth of p. The pragmatist tradition has long offered inspiration to those who doubt this claim. Recently, a neo-pragmatist movement, Keith Frankish (), and Conor McHugh ()) has given rise to a serious challenge to exclusivity. In this article, I defend exclusivity in the face of this challenge. First, (...)
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  43.  24
    Objectivism and Perspectivism About the Epistemic Ought.Conor McHugh & Jonathan Way - 2017 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 4.
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  44. Normativism and Doxastic Deliberation.Conor McHugh - 2013 - Analytic Philosophy 54 (4):447-465.
  45. Reasons or Fittingness First?Richard Rowland - 2017 - Ethics 128 (1):212-229.
    Conor McHugh and Jonathan Way argue that we should put fittingness rather than reasons first because we can provide an account of the evaluative in terms of the normative only if we put fittingness rather than reasons first. I argue that it is no more difficult to provide an account of the evaluative in terms of the normative if we put reasons rather than fittingness first.
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  46. Engel on Doxastic Correctness.Conor McHugh - 2017 - Synthese 194 (5):1451-1462.
    In this paper I discuss Pascal Engel’s recent work on doxastic correctness. I raise worries about two elements of his view—the role played in it by the distinction between i -correctness and e -correctness, and the construal of doxastic correctness as an ideal of reason. I propose an alternative approach.
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  47.  14
    A Dynamical Model of General Intelligence: The Positive Manifold of Intelligence by Mutualism.Han L. J. Van Der Maas, Conor V. Dolan, Raoul P. P. P. Grasman, Jelte M. Wicherts, Hilde M. Huizenga & Maartje E. J. Raijmakers - 2006 - Psychological Review 113 (4):842-861.
  48. Self-Knowledge and the KK Principle.Conor Mchugh - 2010 - Synthese 173 (3):231-257.
    I argue that a version of the so-called KK principle is true for principled epistemic reasons; and that this does not entail access internalism, as is commonly supposed, but is consistent with a broad spectrum of epistemological views. The version of the principle I defend states that, given certain normal conditions, knowing p entails being in a position to know that you know p. My argument for the principle proceeds from reflection on what it would take to know that you (...)
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  49. Judging as a Non-Voluntary Action.Conor McHugh - 2011 - Philosophical Studies 152 (2):245 - 269.
    Many philosophers categorise judgment as a type of action. On the face of it, this claim is at odds with the seeming fact that judging a certain proposition is not something you can do voluntarily. I argue that we can resolve this tension by recognising a category of non-voluntary action. An action can be non-voluntary without being involuntary. The notion of non-voluntary action is developed by appeal to the claim that judging has truth as a constitutive goal. This claim, when (...)
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  50. Russell on Logicism and Coherence.Conor Mayo-Wilson - 2011 - Russell: The Journal of Bertrand Russell Studies 31 (1):89-106.
    According to Quine, Charles Parsons, Mark Steiner, and others, Russell's logicist project is important because, if successful, it would show that mathematical theorems possess desirable epistemic properties often attributed to logical theorems, such as a prioricity, necessity, and certainty. Unfortunately, Russell never attributed such importance to logicism, and such a thesis contradicts Russell's explicitly stated views on the relationship between logic and mathematics. This raises the question: what did Russell understand to be the philosophical importance of logicism? Building on recent (...)
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