Results for 'Consciousness History'

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  1.  34
    A History of the Mind: Evolution and the Birth of Consciousness.N. Humphrey - 1992 - Simon & Schuster.
    This book is a tour-de-force on how human consciousness may have evolved. From the "phantom pain" experienced by people who have lost their limbs to the uncanny faculty of "blindsight," Humphrey argues that raw sensations are central to all conscious states and that consciousness must have evolved, just like all other mental faculties, over time from our ancestorsodily responses to pain and pleasure. '.
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  2. Consciousness: A Natural History.Maxine Sheets-Johnstone - 1998 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 5 (3):260-94.
    The basic question cognitivists and most analytic philosophers of mind ask is how consciousness arises in matter. This article outlines basic reasons for thinking the question spurious. It does so by examining 1) definitions of life, 2) unjustified and unjustifiable uses of diacritical markings to distinguish real cognition from metaphoric cognition, 3) evidence showing that corporeal consciousness is a biological imperative, 4) corporeal matters of fact deriving from the evolution of proprioception. Three implications of the examination are briefly (...)
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  3. Experience and Structure: Philosophical History and the Problem of Consciousness.Paul M. Livingston - 2002 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (3):15-33.
    Investigation and analysis of the history of the concepts employed in contemporary philosophy of mind could significantly change the contemporary debate about the explainability of consciousness. Philosophical investigation of the history of the concept of qualia and the concept of scientific explanation most often presupposed in contemporary discussions of consciousness reveals the origin of both concepts in some of the most interesting philosophical debates of the twentieth century. In particular, a historical investigation of the inheritance of (...)
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  4.  27
    Consciousness: What It is, How to Study It, What to Learn From its History.Guven Guzeldere - 1995 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 2 (1):30-51.
    This article is a version of the first half of an introduction to an anthology on consciousness. It is aimed at tracing the study of consciousness in psychology roughly since psychology pulled itself apart from philosophy as an independent discipline in the late nineteenth century. The second half, which will appear as a sequel to the present article, will cover the various philosophical problems involving consciousness, and trace the consciousness debate to date. The two articles are (...)
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  5.  28
    A Secret History of Consciousness.Gary Lachman - 2003 - Lindisfarne Books.
    Part one: the search for cosmic consciousness -- R.M. Bucke and the future of humanity -- William James and the anesthetic revelation -- Henri Bergson and the Elan Vital -- The superman -- A.R. Orage and the new age -- Ouspensky's fourth dimension -- Part two: esoteric evolution -- The bishop and the bulldog -- Enter the madame -- Dr. Steiner, I presume? -- From Goethean science to the wisdom of the human being -- Cosmic evolution -- Hypnagogia -- (...)
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  6.  28
    Metaphor, History, Consciousness: From Locke to Dennett.D. Lynn Holt - 1999 - Philosophical Forum 30 (3):187-200.
  7. Where Does Mind End?: A Radical History of Consciousness and the Awakened Self.Marc J. Seifer - 2011 - Park Street Press.
     
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  8. This New Science of Ours: A More or Less Systematic History of Consciousness and Transcendence Part I.David L. Tresan - 2004 - Journal of Analytical Psychology 49 (2):193-216.
     
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  9.  50
    How a Neural Correlate Can Function as an Explanation of Consciousness: Evidence From the History of Science Regarding the Likely Explanatory Value of the NCC Approach.Ilya B. Farber - 2005 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (4-5):77-95.
    A frequent criticism of the neuroscientific approach to consciousness is that its theories describe only 'correlates' or 'analogues' of consciousness, and so fail to address the nature of consciousness itself. Despite its apparent logical simplicity, this criticism in fact relies on some substantive assumptions about the nature and evolution of scientific explanations. In particular, it is usually assumed that, in expressing correlations, neural correlate of consciousness (NCC) theories must fail to capture the causal structure relating brain (...)
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  10.  52
    Consciousness: From Perception to Reflection in the History of Philosophy (Review). [REVIEW]Stephan Blatti - 2009 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):pp. 463-464.
    This is a review of Sara Heinämaa, Vili Lähteenmäki, Pauliina Remes (ed.), Consciousness: From Perception to Reflection in the History of Philosophy (Dordrecht: Springer 2007).
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  11.  1
    Husserl, History, and Consciousness.Eva-Maria Engelen - 2010 - In David Hyder & Hans-Jörg Rheinberger (eds.), Science and the Life-World. Stanford University Press.
    The “Crisis” itself is an attempt of enlightenment by examining origins. Husserl knows three philosophical origins of evidence and justification: (1) consciousness; (2) the life-world; (3) european philosophy and the history of the sciences. There is a tension of historicity and ahistoricity in all of these origins. I will show in how far all three origins are under this tension. Because even concerning the notion of absolute consciousness one can show, that it is linked to historicity. The (...)
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  12. Philosophical History and the Problem of Consciousness.Paul M. Livingston - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    The problem of explaining consciousness remains a problem about the meaning of language: the ordinary language of consciousness in which we define and express our sensations, thoughts, dreams and memories. This book argues that the problem arises from a quest that has taken shape over the twentieth century, and that the analysis of history provides new resources for understanding and resolving it. Paul Livingston traces the development of the characteristic practices of analytic philosophy to problems about the (...)
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  13.  72
    A History of Consciousness : From Kant and Hegel to Derrida and Foucault.D. C. Hoy - 1991 - History of the Human Sciences 4 (2):261-281.
    Would a history of the human sciences seem strange if it featured a chapter on the history of consciousness? An argument for including such a chapter could point out that consciousness is often thought to be essential to what it is to be human. Yet the discipline that makes this.
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  14.  11
    Theatre, Opera and Consciousness: History and Current Debate.Heinz-Uwe Haus - 2015 - The European Legacy 21 (1):96-98.
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  15.  21
    Experience and Structure: Philosophical History and the Problem of Consciousness.Paul Livingston - 2002 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (3):15-33.
    Investigation and analysis of the history of the concepts employed in contemporary philosophy of mind could significantly change the contemporary debate about the explainability of consciousness. Philosophical investigation of the history of the concept of qualia and the concept of scientific explanation most often presupposed in contemporary discussions of consciousness reveals the origin of both concepts in some of the most interesting philosophical debates of the twentieth century. In particular, a historical investigation of the inheritance of (...)
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  16. A Short History of the Philosophy of Consciousness in the Twentieth Century.Tim Crane - forthcoming - In Amy Kind (ed.), Philosophy of Mind in the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries: The History of the Philosophy of Mind, Volume 6. Routledge.
    In this paper, it is argued that the late twentieth century conception of consciousness in analytic philosophy emerged from the idea of consciousness as givenness, via the behaviourist idea of “raw feels”. In the post-behaviourist period in philosophy, this resulted in the division of states of mind into essentially unconscious propositional attitudes plus the phenomenal residue of qualia: intrinsic, ineffable and inefficacious sensory states. It is striking how little in the important questions about consciousness depends on this (...)
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  17.  89
    History of Exposure to Self-Focusing Stimuli As a Developmental Antecedent of Self-Consciousness.Alain Morin - 1997 - Psychological Reports 80:1252-1254.
    Szmimary.—The present report investigated the question of how individual differences in self-consciousness devdop. Rimé and LeBon proposed that high self-consciousness follows a history of frequent exposure to selffocusing stimuli, i.e., mirrors, audiences, audio and video devices, and cameras. To explore this hypothesis private and public self-consciousness and past exposure to self-focusing stimuli were assessed in 438 subjects. Analysis indicated that history of frequent exposure to self-focusing stimuli is significantly but weakly related to high private self- (...) in men and to high public self-consciousness in women. This supports previous observations suggesting that the routes to the development of selfconsciousness seem to differ for the two sexes. (shrink)
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  18.  90
    History of Exposure to Audiences as a Developmental Antecedent of Public Self-Consciousness.Alain Morin & Lisa Graig - 2000 - Current Research in Social Psychology 5 (3):33-46.
    Little is know about factors that influence the development of public self-consciousness. One potential factor is exposure to audiences: being repeatedly aware of one's object status could create a high disposition to focus on public self-aspects. To explore this hypothesis public self-consciousness was assessed in two groups of subjects: 62 professors and actors (high exposure to audiences) and 39 people without audience experience. Analysis show that significant differences exist for public self-consciousness in men only. Also, history (...)
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  19.  32
    Epochal Consciousness and the Philosophy of History.Alan M. Olson - 2000 - The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 2000:159-171.
    Does the philosophy of history have a future? In 1949 Karl Jaspers, echoing Hegel, still identified history as the “great question” in philosophy; but in 1966 Karl Löwith observed that the philosophy of history had been reduced to little more than “epochal consciousness.” During the 1970s analytical philosophers endorsed the critical-speculative distinction of C. D. Broad and the question of universal history was effectively bracketed. Post-structuralists and feminists during the 70s and 80s endorsed the observation (...)
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  20. The "Basis and Foundation of All Knowledge Whatsoever": Toward a History of the Concept of Consciousness in Early Modern Philosophy.James G. Buickerood - 1988 - Dissertation, Rutgers the State University of New Jersey - New Brunswick
    The long-accepted interpretation of the history of modern philosophy is that, beginning with Descartes, philosophers explicitly took the data of consciousness as their epistemic foundation. Descartes supposedly held that the mind always thinks and that consciousness is an necessary to thought. Unsatisfied with this doctrine, Leibniz and Locke modified this view of the conscious nature of thought. The former introduced the concept of unconscious thought with petites perceptions, the latter argued that while thought is conscious, the mind (...)
     
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  21. Consciousness: A Natural History.Maxine Sheets-Johnstone - 2007 - Synthesis Philosophica 22 (2):283-299.
    This article shows how the proper question to answer concerning consciousness is not ‘how consciousness arises in matter’, but how consciousness is part and parcel of the evolution of animate forms. The article traces out just such an evolution by consideration of real life forms including bacteria and invertebrates. It vindicates the evolutionary thesis that external proprioceptive organs, as evidenced in their own right, were modified and internalized over time into kinesthetic organs, sustaining, in effect, a directly (...)
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  22. A Brief History of Time-Consciousness: Historical Precursors to James and Husserl.Holly Andersen & Rick Grush - 2009 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (2):277-307.
    William James’ Principles of Psychology, in which he made famous the ‘specious present’ doctrine of temporal experience, and Edmund Husserl’s Zur Phänomenologie des inneren Zeitbewusstseins, were giant strides in the philosophical investigation of the temporality of experience. However, an important set of precursors to these works has not been adequately investigated. In this article, we undertake this investigation. Beginning with Reid’s essay ‘Memory’ in Essays on the Intellectual Powers of Man, we trace out a line of development of ideas about (...)
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  23.  29
    An Analytic-Hermeneutic History of Consciousness.Benj Hellie - forthcoming - In Kelly Michael Becker & Iain Thompson (eds.), Cambridge Companion to History of Philosophy 1945-2015. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
    The hermeneutic tradition divides /physical/ discourse, which takes an 'exterior' point of view in /describing/ its subject-matter, from /mental/ discourse, which takes an 'interior' point of view in /expressing/ its subject-matter: a 'metapsychological dualist' or 'metadualist' approach. The analytic tradition, in its attachment to truth-logic and consequently the 'unity of science', is 'metamonist', and thinks all discourse takes the 'exterior' viewpoint: the 'bump in the rug' moves to the disunification of mind into the functional and (big-'C') Consciousness. Assuming the (...)
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  24.  18
    The Origins and History of Consciousness.Erich Neumann - 1954 - [Princeton, N.J.]Princeton University Press.
    The first of Erich Neumann's works to be translated into English, this eloquent book draws on a full range of world mythology to show that individual consciousness undergoes the same archetypal stages of development as has human consciousness as a whole. Neumann, one of Jung's most creative students and a renowned practitioner of analytical psychology in his own right, shows how the stages begin and end with the symbol of the Uroboros, or tail-eating serpent. The intermediate stages are (...)
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  25.  10
    The Polymorphism of Human Consciousness and the Prospects for a Lonerganian History of Philosophy.Mark D. Morelli - 1995 - International Philosophical Quarterly 35 (4):379-402.
    Lonergan's account of human consciousness as polymorphic self-presence differs significantly from both the variety of contemporary reductionistic accounts and phenomenological treatments still influenced strongly by Cartesian suppositions and/or Kantian restrictions. It is argued that Lonergan's account grounds not only a critical meta-philosophy, but also provides a heuristic structure for a nuanced genetic account of philosophic differences. In this regard, Lonergan's account is claimed to be an adequate grounding for a thorough contemporary response to the Hegelian requirement that philosophers account (...)
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  26.  51
    Imagination, Eliminativism, and the Pre-History of Consciousness.Nigel J. T. Thomas - 1998 - Consciousness Research Abstracts 3.
    Classical and medieval writers had no term for consciousness in anything like the modern sense, and their philosophy seems not to have been troubled by the mind-body problem. Contemporary eliminativists find strong support in this fact for their claim that consciousness does not exist, or, at least, is not an appropriate scientific explanandum. They typically hold that contemporary conceptions of consciousness are artefacts of Descartes' (now outmoded) views about matter and his unrealistic craving for epistemological certainty. Essentially, (...)
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  27.  40
    Imagination, Eliminativism, and the Pre-History of Consciousness.Thomas Nigel - 1998 - Consciousness Research Abstracts 3.
    Classical and medieval writers had no term for consciousness in anything like the modern sense, and their philosophy seems not to have been troubled by the mind-body problem. Contemporary eliminativists find strong support in this fact for their claim that consciousness does not exist, or, at least, is not an appropriate scientific explanandum. They typically hold that contemporary conceptions of consciousness are artefacts of Descartes' (now outmoded) views about matter and his unrealistic craving for epistemological certainty. Essentially, (...)
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  28.  30
    Book Review: Georg Lukács, a Defence of 'History and Class Consciousness' (Tailism and the Dialectic), London, New York, Verso, 2000. 182 Pp. [REVIEW]Andrius Bielskis - 2004 - Studies in East European Thought 57 (1):81-84.
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  29.  4
    The Transcendence of History: Essays on the Evolution of Historical Consciousness. By Joseph L. Esposito.Richard Taft - 1987 - Modern Schoolman 64 (3):209-211.
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  30.  1
    Origins and History of Consciousness.Donnya Wheelwell - 1997 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 4 (5-6):5-6.
    According to most philosophy of mind and cognitive science literature, consciousness has nothing to do with society and little to do with language; it is centred in the individual, conceived as an autonomous rational agent, and it is often reduced to the physics of the brain. Such impoverished reductionist settings exclude nearly everything of any real interest, including most of what is discussed in this paper; in particular, phrases like ‘consciousness raising’, ‘global consciousness of the environment’, and (...)
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  31. The Transcendence of History Essays on the Evolution of Historical Consciousness.Joseph L. Esposito - 1984
     
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  32. The Philosophy of Order: Essays on History, Consciousness, and Politics.Peter-Joachim Opitz, Gregor Sebba & Eric Voegelin (eds.) - 1981 - Klett-Cotta.
     
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  33. Rhetoric and Human Consciousness: A History.Craig R. Smith - 2013 - Waveland Press.
     
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  34. The Language of History in the Renaissance Rhetoric and Historical Consciousness in Florentine Humanism.Nancy S. Struever - 1970
     
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  35.  22
    History and Class Consciousness: Studies in Marxist Dialectics.Georg Lukács - 1971 - MIT Press.
    A series of essays treating, among other topics, the definition of orthodox Marxism, the question of legality and illegality, Rosa Luxemburg as a Marxist, the changing function of Historic Marxism, class consciousness, and the ...
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  36.  78
    Femininity and Masculinity in City-Form: Philosophical Urbanism as a History of Consciousness.Abraham Akkerman - 2006 - Human Studies 29 (2):229-256.
    Mutual feedback between human-made environments and facets of thought throughout history has yielded two myths: the Garden and the Citadel. Both myths correspond to Jung’s feminine and masculine collective subconscious, as well as to Nietzsche’s premise of Apollonian and Dionysian impulses in art. Nietzsche’s premise suggests, furthermore, that the feminine myth of the Garden is time-bound whereas the masculine myth of the Citadel, or the Ideal City, constitutes a spatial deportment. Throughout history the two myths have continually molded (...)
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  37.  77
    What the History of Vitalism Teaches Us About Consciousness and the "Hard Problem".Brian Jonathan Garrett - 2006 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 72 (3):576-588.
    Daniel Dennett has claimed that if Chalmers' argument for the irreducibility of consciousness were to succeed, an analogous argument would establish the truth of Vitalism. Chalmers denies that there is such an analogy. I argue that the analogy does have merit and that skepticism is called for.
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  38. A Brief History of the Philosophical Problem of Consciousness.William E. Seager - 2007 - In P. D. Zelazo, Morris Moscovitch & Evan Thompson (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness. Cambridge University Press. pp. 9--33.
  39. Consciousness Historicized: Philosophical History and the Nature of the Human Sciences.Petteri Pietikainen - 2003 - History of the Human Sciences 16 (2):151-158.
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  40. A Brief History of the Scientific Approach to the Study of Consciousness.Christopher D. Frith & Geraint Rees - 2007 - In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell.
     
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  41. The History of Intentionality: Theories of Consciousness From Brentano to Husserl.Ryan Hickerson - 2007 - Continuum.
    Franz Brentano's claim to fame is the reintroduction of intentionality to the modern philosophy of mind. Hickerson's book offers new interpretations of a central philosophical concept employed in the Brentano School, arguing against the now-standard misreading of Brentano as Immanentist. The History of Intentionality is a continuing history and will be valuable to present-day specialists and students in phenomenology and the philosophy of mind.
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  42. The Concept of Consciousness in the History of Neuropsychiatry.T. Hamanaka - 1997 - History of Psychiatry 8:361-373.
  43.  93
    Fragments of a History of the Theory of Self-Consciousness From Kant to Kierkegaard.Manfred Frank - 2004 - Critical Horizons 5 (1):53-136.
    In the development of modern philosophy self-consciousness was not generally or unanimously given important consideration. This was because philosophers such as Descartes, Kant and Fichte thought it served as the highest principle from which we can 'deduce' all propositions that rightly claimed validity. However, the Romantics thought that the consideration of self-consciousness was of the highest importance even when any claim to foundationalism was abandoned. In this respect, Hölderlin and his circle, as well as Novalis and Schleiermacher, thought (...)
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  44.  21
    The Philosophy of Order: Essays on History, Consciousness and Politics.Thomas Langan - 1983 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 21 (3):424-425.
  45.  17
    Descartes, Consciousness and Depersonalization: Viewing the History of Philosophy From a Strausian Perspective.Avner Cohen - 1984 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 9 (1):7-28.
    This paper develops particular Strausian-like themes on the formation and structure of the Cartesian problematic. Particularly, my interest is to link the Cartesian ‘invention’ of consciousness (or ‘the mental’) in the philosophy of mind with the issues of representation and ‘the problem of the external world’ in epistemology. The Cartesian novelty becomes clear by comparing Cartesian scepticism with Greek classical scepticism. I end with some speculative clinical (i.e., psychiatric) suggestions on possible roots of the Cartesian invention. Keywords: Consciousness, (...)
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  46.  2
    The Philosophy of Order. Essays on History, Consciousness and Politics.Eric Voegelin. Philosopher of History.John H. Hallowell, Peter J. Opitz, Gregor Sebba & Eugene Webb - 1982 - History and Theory 21 (3):425.
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  47.  9
    Dialectical Transformations : Teleology, History and Social Consciousness.István Mészáros - 2008 - In Bertell Ollman & Tony Smith (eds.), Science and Society. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 417 - 433.
    In Marxism, the material base of society is responsible for a number of structural restraints on the appearance, functioning, and evolution of the superstructure. At the same time, the superstructure, too, and especially ideology, exercises considerable influence on developments in the base, and in certain conditions can prove decisive in transforming the relations that constitute the base. While history is radically open ended and, therefore, nothing is absolutely certain, knowledge of such conditions is a necessary first step toward a (...)
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  48.  1
    Ruptures and Traumas in Central European Consciousness: Czech History as a Test Case.Jaroslav Krejci - 1989 - History of European Ideas 11 (1-6):365-376.
  49. Literature and History : Consumption or Consciousness?Inger Gilbert - 1994 - History of European Ideas 19 (4-6):883-888.
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  50. Time and Culture: A History of Time-Consciousness in Europe. [REVIEW]William M. Johnston - 1982 - Philosophy and History 15 (1):85-87.
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